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jerryking : tiff   5

Opinion | The Dominance of the White Male Critic
July 5, 2019 | The New York Times |By Elizabeth Méndez Berry and Chi-hui Yang. Ms. Méndez Berry and Mr. Yang started a program to amplify the work of critics of color.
aesthetics  art  artists  art_reviews  blind_spots  criticism  culture  cultural_criticism  cultural_interpretation  curation  engaged_citizenry  opinions  opinion_makers  TIFF  white-saviors  white_men 
july 2019 by jerryking
Moonlight bravely aims to create a fuller picture of black masculinity - The Globe and Mail
ANDRAY DOMISE
Special to The Globe and Mail Last updated: Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016

Moonlight is an undeniably beautiful coming-of-age story told in three parts, adapted from playwright Tarell McCraney’s In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue. To say it tells the story of a young man growing up is true, and to say this film is a cinematic achievement is also true, but both are understatements. In film, literature and especially the evening news, black masculinity is rarely explored as more than a pathology – gnarled and twisted by crime, poverty and broken families. Through striking visuals and muted, simmering performances from the cast, Jenkins diffracts a broad range of black stereotypes and masterfully reunites them with their missing layers of humanity.
films  TIFF  movies  African-Americans  masculinity  Andray_Domise  Moonlight  coming-of-age  '80s  multidimensional  Miami  stereotypes  think_threes 
october 2016 by jerryking
An insider's guide to Toronto with Cameron Bailey
SEPTEMBER 27, 2014 | BlogTO | Posted by Alexander Huls.

TIFF's Artistic Director, Cameron Bailey, has a life many a film buff would envy. As a chief orchestrator of the Toronto International Film Festival, Bailey lives and breathes film, and has become one of the festival's most public faces in the process. He has helped makes Toronto one of the epicenters of the film world.

The film professional started out on his path as many do: as a film critic. After realizing his passion for cinema in University, Bailey began reviewing films for outlets like CTV's Canada AM, CBC Radio One, and Now Magazine. At the same time, he also set out on his path as a programmer, contributing his passions to Cinematheque Ontario, the NFB, and, of course, TIFF.

Bailey started programming for TIFF in 1990, and since then - with a lot of hard work - has ascended to greater and greater prominence in the organization. In 2007, he became Festival Co-Director, and as of 2013, he now holds the position of being one of the festival's chief orchestrators as Festival Artistic Director.
African_Canadians  Cameron_Bailey  cultural_criticism  epicenters  films  movies  restaurants  things_to_do  TIFF  Toronto 
september 2014 by jerryking
When it comes to the arts, here’s what Toronto needs in a mayor - The Globe and Mail
KATE TAYLOR
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jun. 30 2014

In their statement, they say they want a Toronto that is ambitious, creative, accessible, forward-thinking, responsive, collaborative and imaginative.

They say the city needs a mayor who has a strategic vision, consensus-building leadership skills and a passion for Toronto; who embodies inclusiveness in all interactions; and who balances the budget.

They also identify five things Toronto needs in order to thrive: a creative and innovative economy, healthy and productive citizens, a vibrant cultural sector, affordable and accessible transportation, and beautiful and connected neighbourhoods and green spaces.
cultural_institutions  art  museums  Toronto  elections  mayoral  ROM  AGO  TIFF  neighbourhoods  parks  public_spaces  forward-thinking  green_spaces 
july 2014 by jerryking
Ink Entertainment CEO Charles Khabouth’s 7 tips for success - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 26 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by COURTNEY SHEA.

To come to my party, be in my corner

At the beginning of September my phone starts ringing non-stop. People who I haven’t heard from in months will call because they want to get into a TIFF party at one of my venues. I have my go-to excuses. I’ll say that the company throwing the event has hired private security or that it’s my venue, but it’s not my event. The truth is I can get anybody I want into any event – that’s part of the contract, but I just don’t want to be used. That said, if I have a great client who supports us throughout the year, I am happy to be able to get them into an event. It’s important to recognize the people who keep your business going.
CEOs  entertainment  entertainment_industry  Charles_Khabouth  restauranteurs  meetings  tips  ksfs  entrepreneur  Toronto  TIFF  serving_others  serial_entrepreneur 
august 2013 by jerryking

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