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jerryking : tibco   8

Making Waves
May 31, 2004 | Barron's Online | Sandra Ward
RFID  Wal-Mart  tools  productivity  Tibco 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Man Who Knows Everything: Vivek Ranadive Profile - Vivek Ranadive TopCom Software
January 19, 2012 | Esquire | by Ryan D'Agostino. Vivek Ranadivé wants to harness the ocean of data in this world. And save civilization.

In the lexicon of computer hardware, a bus is connected to the motherboard — the foundation of any computing system. Ranadivé brought that idea to software: If all the physical components of a computer have a single hub, why not all the information floating through the software? Instead of a traditional hardware bus, an information bus. That's what the Tib in Tibco stands for: "the information bus." The company plucks seemingly disparate bits of data, often in real time — as opposed to "batch processing" at the end of the day, month, quarter — and makes them work with a singular purpose.....Ranadivé's goal is to make sense of the pile of data created by information overload. Tibco's mantra: the right information to the right people at the right time in the right context.
Vivek_Ranadivé  Tibco  massive_data_sets  data  real-time  Silicon_Valley  event-driven  WEF  Davos  Reliance  location_based_services  mantras  LBMA  the_right_people 
may 2012 by jerryking
Annals of Innovation: How David Beats Goliath: Reporting & Essays: The New Yorker
May 11, 2009 |The New Yorker | by Malcolm Gladwell. How
underdogs create opportunities by first understanding their strengths,
weaknesses, and the rules of the game, and then changing the rules....To Gladwell, the story illustrated how traditions become blind spots. “Playing insurgent basketball did not guarantee victory. It was simply the best chance an underdog had of beating Goliath,” he wrote. “And yet somehow that lesson has escaped the basketball establishment.” The anecdote became the opening passage of the book David and Goliath, another fixture on bestseller lists....A few years ago, Ranadivé wrote a paper arguing that even the Federal Reserve ought to make its decisions in real time—not once every month or two. “Everything in the world is now real time,” he said. “So when a certain type of shoe isn’t selling at your corner shop, it’s not six months before the guy in China finds out. It’s almost instantaneous, thanks to my software. The world runs in real time, but government runs in batch. Every few months, it adjusts. Its mission is to keep the temperature comfortable in the economy, and, if you were to do things the government’s way in your house, then every few months you’d turn the heater either on or off, overheating or underheating your house.” Ranadivé argued that we ought to put the economic data that the Fed uses into a big stream, and write a computer program that sifts through those data, the moment they are collected, and make immediate, incremental adjustments to interest rates and the money supply. “It can all be automated,” he said. “Look, we’ve had only one soft landing since the Second World War. Basically, we’ve got it wrong every single time.”
anecdotal  basketball  batch_processing  blind_spots  books  coaching  creating_opportunities  decision_making  economic_data  innovation  interest_rates  Malcolm_Gladwell  massive_data_sets  money_supply  overlooked_opportunities  rainmaking  real-time  rules_of_the_game  strategy  strengths  Tibco  underdogs  U.S._Federal_Reserve  Vivek_Ranadivé  weaknesses 
may 2009 by jerryking

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