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jerryking : trader_joe's   6

Can America Learn to Love Misshapen Veggies? - Elizabeth Segran - The Atlantic
ELIZABETH SEGRAN | JUL 1 2014 |

Daily Table, a grocery store he is launching this fall in Roxbury, a low-income Boston suburb. Rauch plans to salvage food discarded by supermarkets and sell it at very low cost to consumers who would not otherwise have the means to adequately feed themselves. If this experiment works, he plans to open stores like it around the country.

The main challenge in this endeavor involves acquiring nearly expired produce and circumventing legal restrictions against selling it after its expiration date.
grocery  supermarkets  fresh_produce  entrepreneur  start_ups  Trader_Joe's  product_launches 
july 2014 by jerryking
Private Matters
October 2003 | Dairy Field | by Lynn Petrak
private_labels  Safeway  Kroger  Trader_Joe's  dairy 
august 2012 by jerryking
Innovation in Private-Label Branding
Spring 2005 | Design Management Review | by Charlie Conn, Director of Branding, Proteus, Boston.

Success in private-label branding boils down to a retailer’s ability to build a brand and control and manage it on a local level to create relationships with consumers....others see innovation coming from the
private-label brands. By creating unique brand experiences for consumers, such retailers as Starbucks, Whole Foods Market, and Trader Joe’s have created truly innovative brands that encourage repeat purchases. From a private-labeling perspective, Starbucks is innovative because it provides exclusive,exclusive, private-label products that are in line with the lifestyle experience it has created. Starbucks reached the pinnacle of success in this area when
one of its exclusive private-label music CDs, “Ray Charles: Genius Loves Company,” won Album of the Year at the 2005 Grammy Awards,
after being nominated in 10 categories. This and other exclusive products contribute to the emotional benefits experienced by Starbucks’ customers, and as a result they contribute to the
bottom line. Private-label branding has been most prevalent
in supermarkets and drug chains. According to the Private Label Manufacturers Association, supermarkets rang in $42.9 billion in sales of store brands in 2003, representing 16.3 percent of overall sales.2 Drug chains reached an all-time high of $3.8 billion in store brand revenues that same year.3 In both sectors, growth of private label brands exceeded the growth of manufacturer brands....

“I’m not sanguine about the major supermarkets,” says Richard J. George, professor of food marketing at the Haub School of Business, Saint Joseph’s University, Philadelphia. “To be successful, supermarkets need to look to customers to determine the set of needs that can be uniquely satisfied. Brands are more than products on the shelf (national brand or private label.) Retailers are brands and need to focus on what the customer wants and how the retailer can positively differentiate the brand. It’s all about customers, not products. Retailers need to think like a brand and act like a retailer.”...A brand is more than just a name and logo. It’s a set of associations that lives in the consumer’s mind—the sum total of everything the brand represents for that consumer. To fully understand what a brand stands for—private-label or otherwise—retailers need to ask themselves:
• How appropriate is the brand?
• What makes it unique?
• Who are the target consumers?
• What functional, rational, and emotional
benefits does it offer consumers?
• How adaptable is it?
• Is it protectable?
Based on understanding these brand attributes, retailers can put some definitions around their positioning statements.
innovation  private_labels  branding  design  retailers  Starbucks  Whole_Foods  supermarkets  Trader_Joe's  brands  strategic_thinking  positioning 
august 2012 by jerryking
The Growing Cachet of the Store Brand - New York Times
By ELIZABETH OLSON
Published: November 27, 2005

Store brands now account for 16.1 percent of total supermarket purchases, worth $40.5 billion annually, up from 14.9 percent, worth $31.2 billion, in 1995, according to Information Resources of Chicago, which collects supermarket scanning data.

But Mr. Sharoff of the private-label association says the market shares of store brands could be twice that 16 percent figure because big-box retailers like Costco and Wal-Mart and specialty stores like Trader Joe's and Whole Foods did not report sales totals for their own labels. Some chains are offering more than one in-house brand. Safeway, for example, has created a signature brand of beef, Rancher's Reserve, and has been heavily promoting the brand to compete with higher-priced national brands.
private_labels  supermarkets  Whole_Foods  Trader_Joe's  big-box  retailers 
july 2012 by jerryking

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