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jerryking : u.s._navy   36

Marines Will Retool, With an Eye to China
Gordon, Michael R.Wall Street Journal, Eastern edition; New York, N.Y. [New York, N.Y]23 Mar 2020: A.1.Publisher logo.

The Marine Corps is undertaking its most sweeping transformation in decades...
adversaries  Asia_Pacific  China  China_rising  maritime  PACOM  reinvention  rising_powers  South_China_Sea  threats  transformational  USMC  U.S._Navy  war  warfare 
5 days ago by jerryking
US navy secretary warns of ‘fragile’ supply chain
November 4, 2019 | Financial Times | by Peter Spiegel and Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson in New York.

Richard Spencer says America is at risk of relying on China and Russia for critical warship components.....many contractors are reliant on single suppliers for certain high-tech and high-precision parts, increasing the likelihood they would have to be procured from geostrategic rivals.......moreover, China (Beijing) was trying to “weaponize capital” through its Belt and Road Initiative whereby Beijing offers developing countries “loan to own” debt that they could not pay back in order to gain leverage over critical assets.....efforts to improve the domestic supply chain have been hampered by repeated government shutdowns and haphazard federal budgeting in recent years......undermining the ability to convince domestic suppliers that there will be a steady stream of business for them if they invest in building out their manufacturing capabilities......the Secretary of the U.S. Navy has recently launched a “trusted capital” programme whereby large private equity firms are invited to bid on failing or non-existent supply needs in areas from ship maintenance to weapons manufacturing.
adversaries  China  developing_countries  fragility  industrial_policies  maritime  military-industrial_complex  One_Belt_One_Road  precision  private_equity  rivalries  Russia  security_&_intelligence  supply_chains  U.S._Navy  SPOF 
november 2019 by jerryking
The U.S. Is Ceding the Pacific to China
March 3, 2019 | WSJ | By Mark Helprin.

While Washington’s focus is elsewhere, Beijing plays the long game—that means preparing for war.

The only effective leverage on China, and by extension North Korea—which otherwise will retain nuclear weapons whether overtly or covertly but certainly—is to alter the correlation of military forces in the Western Pacific, and indeed in the world, so that it no longer moves rapidly and inevitably in China’s favor, which is what China cares about, the essence of its policy, its central proposition. Though with some effort the U.S. is perfectly capable of embarking upon this strategy, it has not. It seems we lack the awareness, political will, intelligence, probity, discipline, leadership, and habit of mind to do so.
America_in_Decline?  Asia_Pacific  balance_of_power  China  China_rising  geopolitics  hard_power  long-term  long-range  maritime  Mark_Helprin  North_Korea  nuclear  PACOM  political_geography  political_will  rivalries  South_China_Sea  strategic_geography  submarines  trade_wars  U.S.  U.S._Navy  USMC  U.S.-China_relations  Xi_Jinping  zero-sum_games 
march 2019 by jerryking
The challenger - Technopolitics
Mar 15th 2018 | HONG KONG AND SAN FRANCISCO.

Technology is rarely, in and of itself, ideological. But technosystems have an ideological side—witness the struggles of open-source advocates against proprietary-software developers—and can be used to ideological ends. The global spread of a technosystem conceived in, and to an unknown extent controlled by, an undemocratic, authoritarian regime could have unprecedented historical significance.

China is not just in a better position to challenge America’s hegemony than it used to be. It is a good time to do so, too. It is not only the roll out of 5G. AI has started to move from the tech world to conventional businesses; quantum computing seems about to become useful. All this creates openings for newcomers, especially if backed by a state that takes a long view and doesn’t need a quick return......To focus on individual companies, though, is to miss the point. China’s leaders want to bind firms, customers and government agencies together with “robust governance”, in the words of Samm Sacks of the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), a think-tank in Washington, DC. They want to build a technosystem in which incentives to use other people’s technology are minimised. These are, as it happens, the same goals as those of the companies which run America’s large technology platforms, whether they are operating systems, social networks or computing clouds.

Gardening tools

A cardinal rule of managing such walled gardens is to control access. Developers of apps for Apple’s iPhone have to go through a lengthy application process with an uncertain outcome; for example, in an unexpected but welcome development, the firm now seems to reject apps using emojis. Similarly, foreign technology firms that want to sell their wares in China face at least six different security reviews, each of which can be used to delay or block market access. As with America’s worries about Huawei, this is not entirely unreasonable. The NSA has in the past exploited, or created, vulnerabilities in hardware sold by American companies. Local firms, for their part, are pushed to use “indigenous and controllable core cyber-security technology”, in the words of a report presented at last year’s National People’s Congress.

In the driving seat
Good platform managers also ensure that all parts of the system work for the greater good. In China this means doing the government’s bidding, something which seems increasingly expected of tech companies. About three dozen tech companies have instituted Communist Party committees in the past few years. There are rumours that the party is planning to take 1% stakes in some firms, including Tencent, not so much to add to the government’s control as to signal it—and to advertise that the company enjoys official blessing.

Many of China’s tech firms help develop military applications for technology, too, something called “civil-military fusion”. Most American hardware-makers do the same; its internet giants, not so much. “There’s a general concern in the tech community of somehow the military-industrial complex using their stuff to kill people incorrectly, if you will,” Eric Schmidt, the head of the Pentagon’s Defence Innovation Advisory Board said last November, when he was still Alphabet’s executive chairman. When it recently emerged that Google was helping the Pentagon with the AI for a drone project, some of its employees were outraged.

And then there is the walled gardens’ most prized bloom: data. China’s privacy regulations can look, on the face of it, as strict as Europe’s. But privacy is not a priority in practice. Control is.
China  U.S._Navy  ecosystems  Silicon_Valley  semiconductors  artificial_intelligence  quantum_computing  intellectual_property  military-industrial_complex  dual-use  walled_gardens  new_tech_Cold_War  self-sufficiency 
april 2018 by jerryking
Chronicle of a war foretold | The Economist
Jun 27th 2015

Ghost Fleet: A Novel of the Next World War.By P.W. Singer and August Cole.Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 404 pages; $28.
war  future  China  China_rising  PACOM  U.S._Navy  books  fiction  book_reviews  U.S.-China_relations 
november 2016 by jerryking
Portents of World Cyberwar - WSJ
By L. GORDON CROVITZ
July 12, 2015

A new novel, “Ghost Fleet,” warns Americans about advances in cyberwarfare that could leave the U.S. as unprepared as Britain was against the U-boats. The title refers to mothballed warships and planes the U.S. recommissions because their pre-Internet technologies haven’t been hacked. (Disclosure: The publisher is Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, on whose board I serve.)

Authors Peter Singer and August Cole are think-tank policy wonks inspired by Tom Clancy’s 1986 “Red Storm Rising.” Clancy’s descriptions of emerging technology, including still-secret stealth aircraft, were so accurate that he was accused of using classified material. The authors of “Ghost Fleet” call their genre “useful fiction.”
cyber_warfare  China  China_rising  fiction  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  U.S._Navy  books  security_&_intelligence  Asia_Pacific  Tom_Clancy  unprepared  stealth 
july 2015 by jerryking
The Secret History of SEAL Team 6: Quiet Killings and Blurred Lines - NYTimes.com
By MARK MAZZETTI, NICHOLAS KULISH, CHRISTOPHER DREW, SERGE F. KOVALESKI, SEAN D. NAYLOR and JOHN ISMAY
JUNE 6, 2015
security_&_intelligence  U.S._Navy  covert_operations  SEALS  U.S._Special_Forces 
june 2015 by jerryking
The key to winning a dogfight? Focus - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Dec. 14 2014,

Keep your focus: Stay abreast of your field, reading widely and probing for information. His team’s knowledge of how to handle the dire situation they faced, from outwitting the enemy after being hit, to the latest survival training when plunged into the water, kept them alive. “The better informed you are, the better you will be,” he said....to get better you have to debrief after your skirmishes....Do you consistently get the most important things done at work? Your day is jammed with many activities, some important and some minutia. You need to know: If you could only accomplish only one thing, what that would be. Events will arise during the day that require your attention, and you must deal with them. But he notes that we often find ourselves in reactive mode, which can sometimes be misguided. This question addresses the active mode, setting out a plan of what to accomplish for the day...How do you and your teammates prepare for each day’s biggest challenges at work? Top guns have lots of computer displays surrounding them in the cockpit. Because of that complexity, they need a simple plan and to spend time discussing the “what ifs,” so when plans need to be altered, they can manoeuvre effectively. “It’s the same with business people. If you’re surprised, you will have trouble,” he warned.
Vietnam_War  veterans  focus  lessons_learned  U.S._Navy  Harvey_Schachter  feedback  scenario-planning  anticipating  preparation  contingency_planning  debriefs  post-mortems  simplicity  off-plan  priorities  surprises  market_intelligence  beforemath 
december 2014 by jerryking
Mark Helprin: Benghazi's Portent and the Decline of U.S. Military Strength - WSJ.com
April 9, 2013 | WSJ | By MARK HELPRIN.

Benghazi's Portent and the Decline of U.S. Military Strength
Ten more Marines per ship won't matter if there aren't ships in the Mediterranean Sea to deploy from.
Mark_Helprin  Mediterranean  U.S._Navy  USMC 
april 2013 by jerryking
The Decline of U.S. Naval Power - WSJ.com
March 2, 2011 |WSJ|By MARK HELPRIN

The Decline of U.S. Naval Power
Sixty ships were commonly underway in America's seaward approaches in 1998, but today there are only 20. We are abdicating our role on the oceans.
U.S._Navy  maritime  America_in_Decline?  decline 
june 2012 by jerryking
Book Review: The Admirals - WSJ.com
May 25, 2012 | By ANDREW ROBERTS
The Hands on the Tiller
U.S._Navy  book_reviews  maritime  WWII 
june 2012 by jerryking
U.S. Plans Naval Shift to Asia - WSJ.com
June 1, 2012 | WSJ | By JULIAN E. BARNES.
U.S. Plans Naval Shift Toward Asia
Pacific to Host 60% of Navy by 2020, Defense Secretary Says, Rejecting View That Move Is Designed to Contain China
PACOM  U.S._Navy  Leon_Panetta  maritime  Asia_Pacific  SecDef  Pentagon 
june 2012 by jerryking
Beijing Launches GPS Rival - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 28, 2011

Beijing Launches Its Own GPS Rival

By JEREMY PAGE
China  China_rising  GPS  U.S._Navy  Taiwan 
december 2011 by jerryking
England, Jones and Clark: The Necessity of U.S. Naval Power - WSJ.com
JULY 11, 2011 | WSJ | By GORDON ENGLAND, JAMES L. JONES, AND VERN CLARK
maritime  U.S._Navy  U.S.foreign_policy 
july 2011 by jerryking
Leading in the Indian Ocean - WSJ.com
* MARCH 10, 2011 Thomas Mahnken and Andrew Shearer:.leading in
the Indian Ocean
Australia and the U.S. need to organize allies to maintain freedom of
navigation as regional rivalries heat up.

As Robert Kaplan recently highlighted in his book "Monsoon," economic
ties are burgeoning across and around the Indian Ocean
region....Beijing's challenge to freedom of navigation in the
Indo-Pacific means that the U.S. and Australia should be thinking about
bringing together their proliferating bilateral maritime security links
in a collective arrangement, one that could pool resources to mount
rapid responses to natural disasters and other contingencies and work
together to keep Asia's vital sea lanes open.
maritime  U.S._Navy  Australia  collective_intelligence  disasters  China_rising  rivalries  Robert_Kaplan  Indian_Ocean  Indo_Pacific  bilateral  rapid-response  natural_calamities 
march 2011 by jerryking
The U.S.S. Prius - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: December 18, 2010
Spearheaded by Ray Mabus, President Obama’s secretary of the Navy and
the former U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia, the Navy and Marines are
building a strategy for “out-greening” Al Qaeda, “out-greening” the
Taliban and “out-greening” the world’s petro-dictators. ...If the Navy
really uses its buying power when buying power, and setting building
efficiency standards, it alone could expand the green energy market in a
decisive way.

And, if Congress will simply refrain from forcing the Navy to use corn
ethanol or liquid coal — neither of which are clean or efficient, but
are located in many Congressional districts — we might really get a
green revolution in the military. That could save lives, money and the
planet, and might even help us win — or avoid — the next war. Go Navy!
buying_power  green  U.S._Navy  USMC  Tom_Friedman  petro-dictators  petro-politics 
december 2010 by jerryking
Why Is the U.S. Rehearsing for a Chinese Invasion of Japan?
Sep 23 2010 | The Atlantic | Max Fisher. China's increasingly
aggressive foreign policy and the volatility of its relationship with
Japan and its East Asia neighbors concerns the U.S. Someday in the
future, our influence abroad, and in East Asia especially, will wane.
The Obama admin. wants to guide East Asian politics in a direction
beneficial to long term U.S. interests which are 4-fold: establish a
mechanism for peaceful conflict resolution, so that war is less likely;
build precedent for the rule of international law, so that China can't
simply bully its neighbors; keep the U.S. involved in East Asian
politics so we aren't shut out; and prevent China from dominating the
South China Sea. The oil-rich sea lane has become a strategically
crucial link from East Asia to the Indian subcontinent, the Middle East,
Africa, and beyond & whoever controls it will control the ability
of navies--whether Chinese, U.S., Indian, or NATO--to project force
across the Eastern & Western hemispheres.
rehearsals  East_Asia  China  China_rising  Japan  U.S._Navy  maritime  contingency_planning  U.S.foreign_policy  rule_of_law  aggressive  conflict_resolution  South_China_Sea 
september 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Contributor - Lose a General, Win a War - NYTimes.com
June 23, 2010 | New York Times | By THOMAS E. RICKS. FOR
most of the U.S.'s history, the armed services have had a strong and
worthy tradition of firing generals who get out of line....If President
Obama is to be faulted, it is for leaving that group in position after
it became apparent last fall that the men could not work well together.

No policy can be successful if those sent to put it in place undermine
one another with snide comments to reporters and leaked memorandums like
the cable disparaging Mr. Karzai written by Ambassador Karl Eikenberry
last year. For this reason, the president should finish cleaning house
and fire Ambassador Eikenberry and the special envoy, Richard Holbrooke.
Obama  Stanley_McChrystal  U.S._military  U.S._Navy  WWII  leadership  firings  U.S._Army  civilian-military_relations  generalship  warfare  war 
june 2010 by jerryking
TheAtlantic.com :: Magazine :: How We Would Fight China
June 2005 | Atlantic | By Robert D. Kaplan. The Middle East is
just a blip. The American military contest with China in the Pacific
will define the 21st century. And China will be a more formidable
adversary than Russia ever was. How should the United States prepare to
respond to challenges in the Pacific? (1) Understand is that the
alliance system of the latter half of the twentieth century is dead.(2)
the functional substitute for a NATO of the Pacific is PACOM.(3)
Ironically, NATO, could be revived by the Cold War in the Pacific.
Bismarck brought peace and prosperity to Central Europe by recognizing
that when power relationships are correctly calibrated, wars tend to be
avoided..."Getting into a war with China is easy," says Michael Vickers,
the dilemma is, How do you end a war with China?"
adversaries  balance_of_power  Bismarck  calibration  China  China_rising  howto  PACOM  rising_powers  Robert_Kaplan  U.S._Navy 
march 2010 by jerryking
Letters to the Editor - Magazine - The Atlantic
Sept. 2005 | Atlantic | Assorted letters w.r.t Robert Kaplan's
cover story "How We Would Fight China" (June). "I believe that China's
intentions are much more defensive than offensive. But the U.S. mil.
must plan according to the capabilities of rising powers with which we
do not have alliances—because intentions and motives can shift
overnight. Although China's intentions may be good, PACOM would not be
doing its job for the taxpayers unless it planned for that to change."
"Of course, diplomacy will provide the ultimate solution in the Pacific,
but in order to avoid tragedy the military must think tragically.
Getting that right increases the credibility of our diplomacy. " "The fundamental driver of Chinese for. policy is not rapacious expansionism or Bismarckian realpolitik...China's for. policy is.. an extension of its domestic politics, specifically the ambition of the Communist Party to retain its pre-eminence despite the ongoing and wholesale transformation of Chinese society."
adversaries  Bismarck  capabilities  China  China_rising  expansionism  intentions  letters_to_the_editor  maritime  motives  PACOM  rapaciousness  rising_powers  realpolitik  Robert_Kaplan  South_China_Sea  thinking_tragically  U.S._Navy 
march 2010 by jerryking
China Flexes Its Muscles - WSJ.com
JANUARY 2, 2008 |Wall Street Journal | by GORDON G. CHANG.
Deng Xiaoping believed that the country should "bide time" and keep a
low profile in international affairs. Deng's successor, Jiang Zemin,
followed this general approach. Current President Hu Jintao has shifted
China in a new direction, restructuring the international system to be
more to Beijing's liking. The belief is that Beijing has embarked on a
path of high-profile force projection, possibly in areas "way beyond the
Taiwan Strait."
China  China_rising  U.S._Navy  Beijing  PLA  foreign_policy  international_system 
march 2010 by jerryking
Managing China's Rise
June 2005 | ATLANTIC MAGAZINE | By Benjamin Schwarz.
Contending effectively with China's ambitions requires a better
understanding of our own. (1) Acknowledge that the pace of China's
military modernization and the nature of its geopolitical alignments are
very much tied to the post—Cold War imbalance of power in Washington's
favor. (2) The U.S. should conduct whatever foreign policies it deems
appropriate—but it must recognize that actions it perceives as selfless,
others will most likely see in an entirely different light.
..Intervention by a dominant power accelerates the rise of other great
powers and ensures their wariness, if not their hostility, toward it.(3)
Rethink how Washington defines a "China threat."(4) examine the
strategic implications raised when regional and great powers emerge.
Far from discouraging the rise of China and other independent powers,
such as the European Union and Japan, Washington should recognize the
significant benefits that can result.
China  geopolitics  China_rising  U.S._Navy  U.S.-China_relations  PACOM  introspection  grand_strategy  strategic_thinking  U.S.foreign_policy  post-Cold_War  misinterpretations  Thucydides_Trap  selflessness  rising_powers  rivalries  confrontations  imbalances 
march 2010 by jerryking
For a Post in Europe, a Renaissance Admiral - NYTimes.com
June 29, 2009 | New York Times | By THOM SHANKER. Profile of new NATO commander, Adm. James G. Stavridis.
profile  NATO  U.S._Navy  security_&_intelligence  renaissance  leaders  spymasters 
june 2009 by jerryking
How to Beat the Somali Pirates | USNI Blog
April 8th USNI blog post on how to manage the Somalia pirate scourge.
piracy  Somalia  U.S._Navy  maritime 
april 2009 by jerryking

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