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jerryking : usaf   15

Expeditionary Leaders, CINCs, and Chairmen Shaping Air Force Officers for Leadership Roles in the Twenty-First Century
Winter 2000| Aerospace Power Journal | DR. JAMES M. SMITH.

Editorial Abstract: In this article, APJ is honored to play a part in announcing to the Air Force the Developing Aerospace Leaders project. The twenty-first-century international environment suggests that our aerospace leaders may need to be more skilled in strategic thinking than their predecessors. How should the Air Force change the currently stovepiped career-and-assignment structure to develop strategy-savvy officers with experience broad enough to lead in an uncertain future? Rising to the challenge of producing such strategist-leaders, the Air Force chief of staff initiated the Developing Aerospace Leaders project in October 1999. Dr. Smith, a member of that team, outlines some of the challenges and proposes one possible solution requiring a substantially changed system of professional military education with specially selected “strategist grooming” assignments for its graduates.
USAF  strategic_thinking  leadership_development  21st._century  military_academies 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Drone Zone - NYTimes.com
By MARK MAZZETTI
Published: July 6, 2012

The Pentagon is increasing its fleet of drones by 30 % and military leaders estimate that, within a year or so, the number of Air Force pilots flying unmanned planes could be higher than the number who actually leave the ground, much about how and where the U.S. government operates drones remains a secret. Even the pilots we interviewed wore black tape over their nametags. The Air Force, citing concerns for the pilots’ safety, forbids them to reveal their last names.

It is widely known that the United States has three different drone programs. The first is the publicly acknowledged program run by the Pentagon that has been operating in Iraq and Afghanistan. The other two are classified programs run separately by the C.I.A. and the military’s Joint Special Operations Command, which maintain separate lists of people targeted for killing.

Over the years, details have trickled out about lethal drone operations in Pakistan, Somalia and Yemen and elsewhere. But the drone war has been even more extensive. According to three current and former intelligence officials I spoke to, in 2006, a barrage of Hellfire missiles from a Predator hit a suspected militant camp in the jungles of the Philippines, in an attempt to kill the Indonesian terrorist Umar Patek. The strike, which was reported at the time as a “Philippine military operation,” missed Patek but killed others at the camp.

The increased use of drones in warfare has led the Air Force to re-engineer its training program for drone pilots. Trainees are now sent to Holloman just months after they join the military, instead of first undergoing traditional pilot training as they did in the past. The Air Force can now produce certified Predator and Reaper pilots in less than two years.

But the accelerated training has created its own problems.
USAF  drones  targeted_assassinations  training_programs 
july 2012 by jerryking
Pentagon Digs In on Cyberwar Front - WSJ.com
July 6, 2012 |WSJ | By JULIAN E. BARNES.

Pentagon Digs In on Cyberwar Front
Elite School Run by Air Force Trains Officers to Hunt Down Hackers and Launch Electronic Attacks
cyber_warfare  Pentagon  USAF  cyber_security  offensive_tactics 
july 2012 by jerryking
Hunting the Taliban in Las Vegas - Magazine - The Atlantic
September 2006
Print | Close
Hunting the Taliban in Las Vegas

In trailers just minutes away from the slot machines, Air Force pilots control Predators over Iraq and Afghanistan. A case study in the marvels—and limits—of modern military technology
By Robert D. Kaplan
drones  Las_Vegas  Robert_Kaplan  USAF  pilots 
october 2011 by jerryking
Understanding China Through the Ancient Game of Wei Qi, or Go - WSJ.com
JUNE 11, 2011 WSJ By KEITH JOHNSON What Kind of Game Is
China Playing? Forget chess. To understand geopolitics in Taiwan or the
Indian Ocean, U.S. strategists are learning from Go.

The object of Go is to place stones on the open board, balancing the need to expand with the need to build protected clusters.

Go features multiple battles over a wide front, rather than a single decisive encounter. It emphasizes long-term planning over quick tactical advantage, and games can take hours. In Chinese, its name, wei qi (roughly pronounced "way-chee"), means the "encirclement game."
China  strategy  games  Go  chess  geopolitics  U.S._military  leadership_development  USAF  multiple_targets 
june 2011 by jerryking
Noah Shachtman: The Air Force Needs a Serious Upgrade - WSJ.com
JULY 15, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By NOAH SHACHTMAN. Here
are five steps to ensure that the U.S. remains the dominant force in the
sky.
USAF  tips 
july 2010 by jerryking
LeMay and the Tragedy of War - WSJ.com
MAY 15, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by WARREN KOZAK
warfare  USAF  civil_liberties  priorities  greater_good  WWII 
may 2009 by jerryking
Got a competitor on your radar? Make decisions like a fighter pilot
11-19-2007 Globe & Mail article by George Stalk,

Col. John Boyd concluded that difference between fighter pilots with the
most kills and all the others was that the leading scorers exercised
faster OODA loops (the pattern of Observation, Orientation, Decision and
Acting). The OODA loop, Col. Boyd postulated, is faster for a winner
than for a laggard (or loser). Col. Boyd's supporting data and
conclusion convinced the USAF to redesign not only its training of
pilots but the very nature of the equipment they used to insure that,
over all, its pilots had faster OODA loops than their opponents.
George_Stalk_Jr.  competitive_advantage  strategy  pilots  OODA  time-based  competition  USAF  decision_making 
february 2009 by jerryking

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