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Cashew foie gras? Big Food jumps on ‘plant-based’ bandwagon
MAY 18, 2019 | Financial Times | by Leila Abboud in Paris and Emiko Terazono in London

* Boom in meat and dairy substitutes sets up ‘battle for the centre of the plate’
* Nestlé recently launched the Garden Gourmet's Incredible burger in Europe and plans to launch it in the US in the autumn in conjunction with McDonald’s.
* Burger King has partnered with a “foodtech” start-up to put meat-free burgers on their menu.
* Pret A Manger is considering a surge in its roll-out of vegetarian outlets as it looks into buying UK sandwich rival Eat.

A change is afoot that is set to sweep through the global food industry as once-niche dietary movements (i.e. vegetarians, then the vegans, followed by a bewildering array of food tribes from veggievores, flexitarians and meat reducers to pescatarians and lacto-vegetarians ) join the mainstream.

At the other end of the supply chain, Big Food is getting in on the act as the emergence of plant-based substitutes opens the door for meat market disruption. Potentially a huge opportunity if the imitation meat matches adoption levels of milk product alternatives such as soy yoghurt and almond milk, which account for 13% of the American dairy market. It is a $35bn opportunity in the US alone, according to newly listed producer Beyond Meat, given the country’s $270bn market for animal-based food. 

Packaged food producers, burdened with anaemic growth in segments from drinks to sweets, have jumped on the plant-based bandwagon. Market leaders including Danone, Nestlé and Unilever are investing heavily in acquisitions and internal product development.

Laggards are dipping their toes. Kraft-Heinz, for example, is investing in start-ups via its corporate venture capital arm and making vegan variants of some of its products. Even traditional meat producers, such as US-based Tyson Foods and Canada’s Maple Leaf Foods, are diversifying into plant-based offerings to remain relevant with consumers.......“Plant-based is not a threat,” said Wayne England, who leads Nestlé’s food strategy. “On the contrary, it’s a great opportunity for us. Many of our existing brands can play much more in this space than they do today, so we’re accelerating that shift, and there is also space for new brands.” .....a plethora of alternative protein products are hitting supermarket shelves... appealing to consumers for different reasons....(1) reducing meat consumption for health reasons... (2) others concerned about animal welfare...(3) concern over agriculture’s contribution to climate change......As Big Food rushes in, it faces stiff competition from a new breed of start-ups that have raced ahead to launch plant-based meats they claim look, taste and feel like the real thing. Flush with venture capital funding, they have turned to technology, analysing the molecular structure of foods and seeking to reverse-engineer versions using plant proteins......Not only are the disrupters innovating on the product side, they are rapidly creating new brands using digital marketing and partnerships with restaurants. Big food companies, which can struggle to create new brands, often rely on acquisitions to bring new ones onboard.....Aside from the quality of the new protein substitutes, how they are marketed will determine whether they become truly mass-market or remain limited to the margins of motivated vegetarians and vegans. The positioning of the product in stores influences sales, with new brands such as Beyond Meat pushing to be placed in the meat section rather than separate chilled cabinets alongside the vegetarian and vegan options.....Elio Leoni Sceti, whose investment company recently backed NotCo, a Chile-based start-up that uses machine learning to create vegetarian replicas of meat and dairy, believes new brands have an edge on the marketing side because they are not held back by old habits. 

“The new consumer looks at the consequences of consumption and believes that health and beauty come from within,” said one industry veteran who used to run Birds Eye owner Iglo. “They’re less convinced by the functional-based arguments that food companies are used to making, like less sugar or fewer calories. This is not the way that consumers used to make decisions so the old guard are flummoxed.”...Dan Curtin, who heads Greenleaf, the Maple Leaf Food's plant-based business, played down the idea that alternative meats will eat into meat sales, saying the substitutes were “additive”. “We don’t see this as a replacement. People want options,” he said. 

 
animal-based  Beyond_Meat  Big_Food  brands  Burger_King  CPG  Danone  diets  digital_strategies  food_tech  hamburgers  Impossible_Foods  Kraft_Heinz  laggards  Maple_Leaf_Foods  McDonald's  meat  Nestlé  new_products  plant-based  rollouts  shifting_tastes  start_ups  tribes  Unilever  vegetarian  vc  venture_capital 
may 2019 by jerryking
The Missing Piece in Big Food’s Innovation Puzzle
April 1, 2019 | WSJ | by By Carol Ryan.

.......In truth, they are becoming reliant on others to do the heavy lifting. Specialist food ingredient companies like Tate & Lyle and Kerry Group work with global brands behind the scenes to come up with new ideas. These businesses can spend two to three times more on innovation as a percentage of turnover than their biggest clients.

One part of their expertise is overhauling recipes. Ingredients companies can do everything from adding trendy probiotics to taking out excess sugar or gluten. Nestlé got a hand from Tate & Lyle to remove more sugar from its Nesquik range of flavored drinks, while Denmark’s Chr. Hansen helped Kraft Heinz switch from artificial to natural colors in the U.S. giant’s Macaroni & Cheese......Another service food suppliers offer is coming up with successful innovations to help revive sales. Nestlé’s ruby chocolate KitKat, which has become very popular in Asia, was actually created by U.S. cocoa producer Barry Callebaut, for example.

=============================================
See also, "For innovation success, do not follow the money"
07-Nov-2005 | Financial Times | By Michael Schrage "There is
no correlation between the percentage of net revenue spent on R&D
and the innovative capabilities of an organisation – none,"...Just ask
General Motors. No company in the world has spent more on R&D over
the past 25 years. Yet, somehow, GM's market share has
declined....R&D productivity – not R&D investment – is the real
challenge for global innovation. Innovation is not what innovators
innovate, it is what customers actually adopt. Productivity here is not
measured in patents granted but in new customers won and existing
customers profitably retained..
customer_profitability  Big_Food  brands  flavours  food  foodservice  health_foods  healthy_lifestyles  ingredients  ingredient_diversity  innovation  investors  Kraft_Heinz  large_companies  Mondelez  Nestlé  new_ideas  R&D  shifting_tastes  start_ups  Unilever 
april 2019 by jerryking
P&G Buys Walker & Co. to Expand Offerings to African-Americans - WSJ
By Aisha Al-Muslim
Dec. 12, 2018

Procter & Gamble Co. PG +0.19% has acquired Walker & Co. Brands as the consumer-products giant looks to serve more African-Americans with health and beauty products.

Palo Alto, Calif.-based Walker sells grooming products for men under the brand Bevel and hair-care products for women under the Form Beauty brand.

Walker will operate as a separate and wholly owned subsidiary of P&G, continuing to be led by its founder and Chief Executive Tristan Walker, ......Last year, Anglo-Dutch consumer products firm Unilever PLC acquired Sundial Brands, a New York-based hair-care and skin-care products company predominantly targeting African-Americans, for an undisclosed sum. Sundial’s brands include SheaMoisture, Nubian Heritage, Madam C.J. Walker and nyakio.
African-Americans  Bevel  black-owned  brands  exits  hair  P&G  personal_care_products  personal_grooming  Tristan_Walker  Unilever  founders 
december 2018 by jerryking
An unusual family approach to investing
May 30, 2018 | FT | John Gapper.

JAB’s acquisition of Pret A Manger resembles private equity but with a long-term twist.

Warren Buffett’s definition of Berkshire Hathaway’s ideal investment holding period as forever. ....Luxembourg-based JAB, owned by four heirs to a German chemical fortune, takes a family approach to investing. It is unusual in that this holding company seeks to retain its portfolio companies for at least a decade. These include Panera Bread, Krispy Kreme and Keurig Green Mountain coffee, which it merged with Dr Pepper Snapple in an $18.7bn deal in January 2018. This week JAB acquired the UK sandwich chain Pret A Manger for £1.5bn, continuing its buying spree of cafés and coffee, mounting a challenge to public companies such as Nestlé.

**These companies are acquired not to be traded but to be invested in and expanded.**

JAB is an innovative combination of ownership and investment in a world that needs challengers to stock market ownership and private equity. It is family controlled, but run by veteran professional executives. When it invests in companies such as Pret A Manger, it deploys not only the Reimann family’s wealth but that of other entrepreneurs and family investors.......Some of the equity for its recent deals, including Panera and Dr Pepper, came from funds raised by Byron Trott, the former Goldman Sachs investment banker best known for being trusted by the banker-averse Mr Buffett. Mr Trott’s BDT banking boutique specialises in advising founders and heirs to corporate fortunes, including the Waltons of Walmart, and the Mars and Pritzker families.

This is investment, but not as most of us know it. By definition, the world’s companies are mostly controlled by founders and their families — only a minority become big enough to be floated on stock markets and need to disclose much of their workings to outsiders. Family fortunes also tend to remain as private as possible: there is little incentive to advertise how much wealth one has inherited......As [families'] fortunes grow in size and sophistication, more of the cash is invested in other companies rather than in shares and bonds. That is where JAB and Mr Trott come in.

Entrepreneurs and their families tend to be fascinated by their own enterprises and bored by managing their wealth. But they want to preserve it, and they often like the idea of investing it in companies similar to their own — industrial and consumer groups that need more capital to expand. It is not only more interesting but a form of self-affirmation for the successful....Being acquired by JAB is appealing. The group turns up, says it will not take part in an auction but offers a good price (it bought Pret for more than its former owner Bridgepoint could get by floating it). It often keeps the existing executives, telling them they have to plough their own money into the company, and invests in long-term growth provided the business is efficiently run.

This is more congenial than heading a public company and contending with a huge variety of shareholders, including short-term and activist investors. It is also less risky than being bought by 3G Capital, the cost-cutting private equity group with which Mr Buffett teamed up to acquire Kraft Heinz. While 3G is expert at eliminating expenses it is less so at encouraging growth.
coffee  dynasties  high_net_worth  holding_periods  investing  investors  JAB  long-term  Nestlé  Pritzker  private_equity  privately_held_companies  Unilever  unusual  Warren_Buffett  family  cafés  Pret_A_Manger  3G_Capital  discretion  entrepreneur  boring  family_business  heirs 
may 2018 by jerryking
Technology has upended the world’s advertising giants - Mad men adrift
March 31st, 2018 | The Economist |

The world’s advertising giants are struggling to adapt to a landscape suddenly dominated by the duopoly of Google and Facebook. Some of their biggest clients, such as Procter & Gamble (P&G) and Unilever, are also being disrupted, in their case by smaller online brands and by Amazon. They are cutting spending on advertising services, and also building more capabilities in-house. Consultancies with digital expertise such as Deloitte and Accenture are competing with agencies, arguing that they know how to connect with consumers better, and more cheaply, using data, machine learning and app design.......This month Marc Pritchard, chief brand officer of P&G, criticised their (i.e. the ad giants) model as a “Mad Men” operation that is “archaic” and overly complex in an era when campaigns and ads need to be designed and refined quickly across lots of platforms.

Technological forces are buffeting this model.

(1) The first big challenge is disintermediation. Despite the growing backlash against the tech giants, Google and Facebook make it easy for firms big and small to advertise on their platforms and across the internet via their powerful ad networks.
(2) The second headache is the rise of ad-free content for consumers, especially on Netflix, and the corresponding disruption of ad-supported television, which has declining viewership globally.
(3) Third, Amazon’s e-commerce might, and the growing clout of internet-era direct-to-consumer upstarts, have weakened the distribution muscle and pricing power of the advertising giants’ biggest clients.....cost discipline among clients is driven partly by the influence of thrifty private-equity investors like 3G, the Brazilian owner of AB InBev, the world’s largest brewer......Sir Martin argues that the budgetary pressures that have forced his clients to cut back on advertising are a cyclical problem, not like the structural challenges posed by technological disruption.

In private, however, a senior executive at a rival ad-holding firm rejects much of this optimism. Technological disruption and disintermediation, he says, will only deepen. The efficiency of targeted digital ads means companies can spend less for the same outcome in branding. ....The advertising firms are responding by hiring away talent, acquiring businesses (in 2015 Publicis bought Sapient, a digital consultancy, for $3.7bn) and gradually changing how they make money. Their plans mostly boil down to two things: investing in digital services and consolidating their collections of businesses so that they can provide a range of services to one client more cheaply under one account.
advertising  economics  marketing  advertising_agencies  Martin_Sorrell  digital_strategies  WPP  Google  Facebook  Amazon  competitive_landscape  P&G  Unilever  disruption  Deloitte  Accenture  Publicis  Omnicom  via:sparkey  ad-tech  programmatic  direct-to-consumer 
april 2018 by jerryking
Big brands lose pricing power in battle for consumers
Save to myFT
Anna Nicolaou in New York and Scheherazade Daneshkhu in London 2 HOURS AGO

The product manufacturers are being squeezed by the big retailers — notably, Amazon and Walmart, which together sell $600bn worth of goods a year. Walmart has long put pressure on suppliers to cut prices. Amazon’s rise has exacerbated the “deflationary impact”, Société Générale says, creating a “much tougher environment in the US”. After Amazon bought Whole Foods in June, the price war grew more intense in groceries, pushing prices to historic lows that punished producers. 

Brand loyalty has suffered in the process. Equipped with the tools to compare prices online instantly, and bombarded with more choices, shoppers are growing more likely to opt for cheaper and discounted products — particularly in categories such laundry detergent and shampoo. To keep their spots on store shelves, brands are having to accept lower prices......Former Amazon employees say the company’s algorithms scan prices across competitors in real time, automatically adjusting its own so it can offer the lowest price. While most big brands have wholesale agreements with Amazon, third-party sellers are prolific on the site, complicating price control further. A 34oz bottle of P&G’s Pantene Pro-V Shampoo & Conditioner was listed by 10 different sellers — nine of them third parties — on the shopping site.

Amazon’s dominance makes it difficult for brands to abandon the platform, or try to sell directly on their own websites. “You have 200m customers on Amazon. If you walk away, there’s 200m people who are going to just buy from your competitors,” says James Thomson, a former Amazon manager who consults brands. “You’re probably not going to win.”

“This is a pretty dire situation,” he adds. “If brands are worried about meeting quarterly targets, they can’t afford to lose Amazon sales.”

Still, “the retailers have nothing to gain by pushing [consumer products makers] into bankruptcy”,
......Consumer goods companies have responded to the pricing pressures by aggressively cutting costs, led by the “zero-based budgeting” model of 3G Capital,
large_companies  Fortune_500  brands  CPG  pricing  price_wars  shareholder_activism  Amazon  P&G  Nestlé  win_backs  price-cutting  Nelson_Peltz  shifting_tastes  Colgate-Palmolive  upstarts  Unilever  zero-based_budgeting  3G_Capital  e-commerce  Mondelez  Big_Food 
february 2018 by jerryking
A Day in the Life of Silicon Valley Power Player Kirsten Green
Oct. 3, 2017 | WSJ | By Francesca Mari.

HE DRIVER’S SEAT Kirsten Green, founder and general partner at early-stage venture capital firm Forerunner Ventures, Although Green formalized her venture capital firm Forerunner Ventures with its first institutional fund only five years ago, she has already built one of the most recognizable portfolios in the tech world. And with the sale of two of her early investments last year—Jet.com to Walmart for $3.3 billion and Dollar Shave Club to Unilever for $1 billion—she’s become one of the most prominent players in venture capital, an industry dominated by men......In 2008, she invested in a company started by two Stanford business grad students: Bonobos. She liked the founders, and they agreed to share their insights with her. “I couldn’t lose other people’s money, but I could invest in my own learning,” .......
Silicon_Valley  women  vc  retailers  Kirsten_Green  Warby_Parker  Bonobos  Dollar_Shave_Club  Unilever 
october 2017 by jerryking
Benevolent Bacon? Nestle And Unilever Gobble Up Niche Brands - WSJ
By Saabira Chaudhuri
Sept. 7, 2017

The global packaged-food industry is facing fierce competition from a burgeoning number of small, but high-growth food and beverage brands. These brands have struck a chord with consumers looking for locally produced or more healthy, natural choices.

Amid this shift, sales from traditional players have flagged, spurring consolidation, cost cutting and restructuring.

Unilever fended off an unsolicited takeover by Kraft Heinz Co. earlier this year. Activist investor Dan Loeb’s Third Point hedge fund in June disclosed a major stake in Nestlé, calling for changes in strategy to improve shareholder returns. In response, the two consumer-goods firms have focused on cost cutting and promises to boost dividends, while going on the hunt for nimbler food and beverage brands with the potential to accelerate growth.

‘We’re experiencing a consumer shift toward plant-based proteins.’
—Nestlé USA Chief Executive Paul Grimwood
Nestlé’s deal to buy Sweet Earth comes less than three months after it bought a stake in subscription-meals company Freshly, which sells healthy, prepared meals to consumers across the U.S.

Moss Landing, Calif.-based Sweet Earth bills itself as a natural, ethical, environmentally conscious company that substitutes plant proteins for animal ones in meals like curries, stir fries, breakfast wraps, burgers and pasta. Founded in 2011, Sweet Earth is available in more than 10,000 stores in the U.S. It is stocked at independent natural grocers, as well as bigger chains like Amazon.com Inc.’s Whole Foods, Target Corp. , Kroger Co. and Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

“We’re experiencing a consumer shift toward plant-based proteins,” said Paul Grimwood, chief executive of Nestlé’s U.S. arm. Plant-based food, as a sector, is growing at double-digit percentages rates, Nestlé said.
Big_Food  brands  CPG  emotional_connections  Unilever  niches  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  Nestlé  shifting_tastes  start_ups  large_companies  Fortune_500  plant-based  healthy_lifestyles  high-growth  gazelles 
september 2017 by jerryking
Hard sell for the ad men
| Financial Times |

Consumer goods groups are cutting costs amid slowing growth – the advertising industry is first to feel the pinch
CPG  cost-cutting  shareholder_activism  advertising  Big_Food  advertising_agencies  P&G  bots  marketing  budgets  Unilever  ABInBev  Mondelez  WPP  Interpublic  brands  Nestlé  slow_growth 
august 2017 by jerryking
Hyena capitalism receives a swift kick from the Unilever giraffe
25 February/26 February 2017 | FT| Robert Armstrong.

the rise in hyena capitalism — broadly, the emphasis on squeezing the maximum present return out of assets — is an effect of low economic growth. When the number of US workers was increasing and innovation was delivering faster productivity growth, there were lots of reasons to invest. Today it just makes more sense to focus on cost.....More generally, it may be that, since the financial crisis, spooked managements and, in the case of public companies, investors have become increasingly risk averse — more so than the state of the economy would justify. So money piles up on balance sheets, is paid as dividends, or goes to repurchase shares. Investment falls, despite the availability of cheap credit to fund new projects.
It also looks increasingly likely that the change in management incentive structures, in particular the increase in share-based incentives and shortening tenures for top executives, have made company leaders less inclined to invest. there is a risk that it could become self-reinforcing. Lack of investment affects not just future productivity, but also demand. At the extreme, if no one invests, no one earns and there is no growth. If companies are forgoing opportunities to invest, they are depriving the economy of customers with money to spend.
More insidiously, it could be that hyena capitalism undermines trust in the institutions and mores that makes corporate capitalism possible in the first place. If workers know they are regarded as dispensable cost centres, why should they commit to learning company-specific skills and procedures? Why not shirk instead? If the gains from corporate transformations go overwhelmingly to investors and financiers, why should voters support free market policies?
Capitalism needs both giraffes and hyenas. But in a time of modest growth, low productivity growth and rising inequality, one must keep an especially close eye on the hyenas.
CPG  Unilever  3G_Capital  private_equity  public_companies  consumer_goods  Kraft_Heinz  inefficiencies  capitalism  sweating_the_assets  undermining_of_trust  deprivations 
march 2017 by jerryking
The ‘Warren Buffett of Brazil’ Behind the Offer for Unilever
FEB. 17, 2017 | The New York Times | by LIZ MOYER.
Profile of Jorge Paulo Lemann.

Mr. Lemann, 77, a Harvard-educated former Brazilian tennis champion, ranks 19th on the Forbes list of world billionaires, with a fortune estimated at $29 billion. He and his partners at 3G have developed over the years what many call a playbook for extracting costs from companies by eliminating frivolities like corporate-owned aircraft and expensive office space, revamping management and slashing jobs.

They instill strict austerity that forces managers to justify expenses beyond basic operating needs. Their model makes expansion overseas crucial for increasing returns.

They have also focused on major consumer brands rather than on diversifying......Mr. Lemann and Mr. Buffett share a similar investment philosophy: patience. Instead of selling his portfolio after he has cut and remodeled companies, Mr. Lemann has used Anheuser-Busch InBev and now Kraft Heinz as base camps for further global expansion.
3G_Capital  private_equity  Brazilian  patience  Unilever  Kraft_Heinz  Harvard  moguls  high_net_worth  cost-cutting  Warren_Buffett  playbooks 
february 2017 by jerryking
The Risks of Mission-Driven Companies–Part 1 - Risk & Compliance - WSJ
October 9, 2014 | WSJ | Gregory J. Millman is a senior columnist with Risk & Compliance Journal He is the author of The Vandals’ Crown: How Rebel Currency Traders Overthrew the World’s Central Banks, and several other books.
AMERICAN HALAL, BEN & JERRY'S, COCA COLA CO., GREENMONT CAPITAL PARTNERS, MARY'S GONE CRACKERS, MISSION-DRIVEN, ODWALLA, UNILEVER PLC

The fact that the founder and the investors in Mary’s Gone Crackers disagree about such fundamental issues as how to grow, the role of capital, and the motivations of investors exemplifies the risk and governance challenges that mission-driven companies can pose.

Acquirers also face risk when buying such businesses. “It’s extraordinarily difficult for a large company to take over a company with a specific brand consciousness that has to be operated on an arms- length basis from a marketing standpoint. Very few companies can manage to do that,” said Lewis Paine, senior vice president for consulting at marketing research firm GfK.

At ice cream maker Ben & Jerry’s, acquired by Unilever PLC in 2000, “there have been a lot of bumps on the road,” said the unit’s chief executive, Jostein Solomon. An unusual sales contract, which we will discuss in more detail in the next article in this series, has helped keep the mission identity of the ice cream maker on track despite those bumps. Even so, said Brad Edmondson, author of the book Ice Cream Social: The Struggle for the Soul of Ben & Jerry’s, “It took Unilever a long time to really understand what it had agreed to, and there was a period of eight or nine years when Ben & Jerry’s and Unilever did not have a good working relationship.”

Adnan Durrani, founder of American Halal, said in a recent interview with Risk & Compliance Journal: “In a socially responsible business, the connection to the consumer is tied in with the brand value; one reason consumer packaged goods companies pay higher multiples for such businesses is that they want to grab those consumers. But once they do, they lose sight of the fact that there is authentic trust and transparency when the management team is close to that community.”

Business as usual may kill the goose that laid the golden egg.
books  Unilever  brands  privately_held_companies  Odwalla  mission_statements  Coca-Cola  motivations  values  large_companies  mission-driven  cultural_clash 
october 2014 by jerryking
Salad Dressings Are Getting Squeezed - WSJ.com
August 12, 2013 | WSJ |By ANNIE GASPARRO.

Pinnacle Foods said the portfolio it is buying—salad dressing flavors under the Western and Wish-Bone brands—have combined annual sales of about $190 million. It said the brands have "attractive margins" and strong cash flow. Pinnacle said it is looking at efficiencies on the production line that will allow it to boost profit margins, as well as a tax benefit of about $125 million it expects from the acquisition.

Pinnacle said it specializes in "reinvigorating iconic brands." It also owns Aunt Jemima syrup and Duncan Hines baked goods—as well as older brands found in the shrinking center aisles of grocery stores that are putting more focus on fresh items such as produce and meats.
salads  salad_dressings  private_labels  Kraft  Unilever  brands 
august 2013 by jerryking
Nabbing grocery shoppers where it counts most – at the store shelf
Jun. 11 2012 | - The Globe and Mail | MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER.
consumer-products giant Unilever Canada Inc. will soon move almost all its marketing spending for its Knorr products – about $5-million annually – to in-store initiatives such as displays, signs, samplings and chef appearances while ditching television, radio, digital and other media ads.
grab shoppers’ attention at the store aisle where most – 76 per cent – of today’s purchasing decisions are being made, compared with 70 per cent in 1995.
grocery  Marina_Strauss  Unilever  CPG  Kraft  in-store 
june 2012 by jerryking
"Ploughing with the former foe."
Lucas, Louise. "Ploughing with the former foe." Financial Times 10 May 2012: 14. Infotrac Newsstand. Web. 13 May 2012.
Document URL
http://go.galegroup.com.ezproxy.torontopubliclibrary.ca/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA289150219&v=2.1&u=tplmain_z&it=r&p=STND&sw=w
NGOs  SABMiller  Unilever  palm_oil  Nestlé  agriculture 
may 2012 by jerryking
Streetwise strategy for an urban future
March 28 2011 | FT.com | By Andrew Hill. The McKinsey Global
Institute, the consultancy’s research arm, has projected how hundreds of
cities may fuel the global economy in 2025. Its “Urban World” report
suggests a bigger contribution to growth, the lodestone of corporate
strategy, will come from places below the top rank than from megacities
like Shanghai, New York and Delhi. What’s more, 230 of those places –
“middleweight” cities, poised to expand – don’t even appear in today’s
top 600.

The report sends an urgent invitation to companies to rethink their
country- and continent-specific approach to strategy and look more
closely at urban centres and clusters. Farewell, Emea and Brics. Hello,
Huambo, Medan and Viña del Mar.
McKinsey  urban  Richard_Florida  demographic_changes  North_Star  cities  China  unilever  Yum_Brands  clusters  megacities  growth  global_economy 
march 2011 by jerryking
Discounts offered by cellphone exceed marketer's expectations
Jun 25, 2009 | The Globe and Mail. pg. B.8 | Terrence
Belford. Samplesaint Inc. of Chicago may have turned the
money-off-coupon industry on its ear. Samplesaint, a two-year-old
venture that creates digital media for mobile phones, has come up with a
way to place discount coupons on cellphone screens.

Consumers register, provide an e-mail address and password and then
download coupons from the www.samplesaint.com site or through text
message addresses placed on supermarket shelves. On the way out, the
cashier scans the on-screen coupon at the checkout counter. No more
waiting for flyers to land on the doorstep, no clipping and saving.
ProQuest  Terrence_Belford  mobile_phones  coupons  Unilever 
april 2010 by jerryking
How to Turn Trash Into Treasure - WSJ.com
April 13, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | By ELLEN BYRON. Under
pressure to deliver growth, a number of consumer-products titans,
including Procter & Gamble Co., Unilever and Colgate-Palmolive Inc.,
have been selling well-known but underperforming brands to better focus
on those with more potential. Smaller firms trying to play Dr.
Frankenstein have bought such familiar castoff brands as Sure and Right
Guard deodorants, Comet cleaner, Aqua Net styling products, Pert Plus
shampoo and Rit dye.
orphan_brands  resuscitation  marketing  consumer_goods  culling  P&G  Unilever  Colgate_Palmolive  CPG  divestitures  brands  under-performing  personal_care_products 
may 2009 by jerryking

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