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Joe Clark is regarded as a failure. He deserves better
January 3, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | MICHAEL HEALEY.

Joe Clark was Canada’s prime minister for nine months, 39 years ago (1979). He was 39 years old when he won the job. The portrait, by Patrick Douglass Cox, excellently captures the essence of Mr. Clark at that age: He’s forthright, sincere, slightly goofy and not entirely comfortable in his own skin. That unemphatic hand betraying whatever argument he’s making to the House of Commons.......He quit in 1993, then came back in 1998 to take over as leader of a severely diminished PC Party for the second time. He was bent on resisting a merger with the Alliance Party. He lost that principled fight, too. By 2004, even though his party no longer existed, he still referred to himself as a Progressive Conservative.

......The single unequivocal success he managed, in his nine months in power, was this: He brought 60,000 South Asian refugees, fleeing chaos in Vietnam and Cambodia, to the country. He did it in record time, and he had to invent the private-sponsorship model to do it. Sure, that was an initiative created by the previous (Liberal) government, but Mr. Clark didn’t care where a good idea came from........... He also managed something incredible – as minister responsible for constitutional affairs, he got two territorial leaders and 10 provincial premiers to agree to constitutional reform through the Charlottetown Accord. .....Sure, the Accord failed in a national referendum. But that had everything to do with Mr. Mulroney’s permeating unpopularity. Few people recognize the immensity of Mr. Clark’s feat because of how things turned out......These qualities: stubbornness, idealism, a willingness to subsume his ego to get things done, made him an effective statesman. Hence the strong poll numbers at the end of his career.
'70s  Brian_Mulroney  Canada  consensus  Joe_Clark  mass_migrations  Pierre_Trudeau  politicians  population_movements  Progressive_Conservatives  red_Tories  referenda  refugees  South_Asian  statesmen  Vietnam 
january 2019 by jerryking
The Feud That Sank Saigon
MARCH 3, 2017 | The New York Times | Sean Fear
VIETNAM '67
feuds  Vietnam  Vietnam_War  1967  history  politics  Saigon  disputes  rivalries 
march 2017 by jerryking
Movement politics: a guide to the new globalisation
NOVEMBER 24, 2016 by: Alan Beattie.

The Great Convergence: Information Technology and the New Globalization, by Richard Baldwin, Harvard University Press, RRP£22.95/$29.95, 344 pages.

....Just as South Korea has changed, so newly industrialising countries are less keen on setting up entire industries at home and instead try to insert themselves into global supply chains. Sometimes this means changing, not just exploiting, their comparative advantage. Baldwin cites Vietnam, which joined Honda’s supply network by starting to manufacture motorcycle parts using production and technical expertise imported from the parent company. Thus Vietnam’s existing advantage of low-cost labour joined with the management and technical know-how of Japan to create a new specialism......

This framework explains a lot about current tensions around globalisation. For one, the stricken manufacturing towns of the American Midwest, many of whose poorer inhabitants switched to voting for Donald Trump, have experienced first-hand what it feels like rapidly to become a redundant link in a global value chain.

Second, it shows why modern trade deals, such as the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership between the US and EU, are centred on rules protecting patents and copyrights, and allowing foreign corporations to sue governments if they feel their investments are being expropriated. Multinationals are less concerned with goods tariffs, which are now generally low and belong to an earlier era of trade governance, than they are with trying to protect the specialist knowledge on which their global supply chains depend.

It also foresees the future of globalisation once technology has relaxed the third constraint, the movement of people. The easier it becomes to manage processes from afar — improved videoconferencing, remote-controlled robots — the more virtual immigration can substitute for actual and the specialisation of global supply chains proceed even faster.
books  book_reviews  supply_chains  Vietnam  Honda  international_trade  comparative_advantage  patents  videoconferencing  TTP  MNCs  redundancies  globalization  Midwest  Rust_Belt  industrial_Midwest  value_chains  copyright  transatlantic 
november 2016 by jerryking
Recipe: Vietnamese grilled chicken - The Globe and Mail
LUCY WAVERMAN
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, May. 20 2014,
grilled  chicken  Vietnam  Vietnamese  recipes  Lucy_Waverman 
may 2014 by jerryking
In High Seas, China Moves Unilaterally - NYTimes.com
By JANE PERLEZ and KEITH BRADSHERMAY 9, 2014

Vietnam has proved to be a tougher adversary, sending out its own ships to meet the Chinese flotilla and, according to Chinese government reports, using them to ram Chinese ships as many as 171 times in four days.

A prominent Vietnamese political analyst, Nguyen Quang A, summarized the standoff this way: “Invasion is in their blood, and resistance is in our blood.”

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The timing of the move was perceived by some in the region as a test not only of the ability of Southeast Asian nations to stand up to their far more powerful northern neighbor, but also of President Obama’s resolve less than a month after he promised to support American allies in Asia as they deal with a stronger China.

China’s action was almost certainly a long-term plan — the deployment of a deep water drilling rig takes months of preparation.
adversaries  China  China_rising  CNOC  maritime  oil_industry  Vietnam  SOEs  South_China_Sea 
may 2014 by jerryking
General Giap
Oct 12th 2013 | The Economist |

Vo Nguyen Giap, who drove both the French and the Americans out of Vietnam, died on October 4th, 2013...victor at Dien Bien Phu in May 1954 (which pushed the French colonial power to the peace table in Geneva) and and mastermind behind January 1968's Tet-offensive (which eroded the U.S. population's belief in their administration's argument that the U.S. was winning the war"...Here were Bonaparte’s maxims again: audace, surprise. A dash, too, of Lawrence of Arabia, whose “Seven Pillars of Wisdom” General Giap was seldom without. And plenty of Mao Zedong, whose three-stage doctrine of warfare (guerrilla tactics, stalemate, offensive warfare) he had fully absorbed during his brief exile in China, for communist activity, in the early 1940s.
obituaries  Vietnam  Vietnam_War  Napoleon  soldiers  leaders  generalship  offensive_tactics  audacity  1968  militaries 
october 2013 by jerryking
Asia Ponders U.S. Role Amid Syria Strife - WSJ.com
September 10, 2013 | WSJ | By ANDREW BROWNE.
Analysis
Asia Ponders U.S. Role Amid Syria Strife
Doubts Rise in Asia Over U.S. Move to Rebalance Security Obligations Toward the Region
Hillary_Clinton  Asia_Pacific  maritime  security_&_intelligence  China  Japan  Vietnam  John_Kerry 
september 2013 by jerryking
James Webb: The South China Sea's Gathering Storm - WSJ.com
August 20, 2012 | WSJ | By JAMES WEBB
All of East Asia is waiting to see how the U.S. will respond to China's aggression.

As the region has grown more prosperous, the sovereignty issues have become more fierce. Over the past two years Japan and China have openly clashed in the Senkaku Islands, east of Taiwan and west of Okinawa, whose administration is internationally recognized to be under Japanese control. Russia and South Korea have reasserted sovereignty claims against Japan in northern waters. China and Vietnam both claim sovereignty over the Paracel Islands. China, Vietnam, the Philippines, Brunei and Malaysia all claim sovereignty over the Spratly Islands, the site of continuing confrontations between China and the Philippines........History teaches us that when unilateral acts of aggression go unanswered, the bad news never gets better with age. Nowhere is this cycle more apparent than in the alternating power shifts in East Asia. As historian Barbara Tuchman noted in her biography of U.S. Army Gen. Joseph Stillwell, it was China's plea for U.S. and League of Nations support that went unanswered following Japan's 1931 invasion of Manchuria, a neglect that "brewed the acid of appeasement that . . . opened the decade of descent to war" in Asia and beyond.
Barbara_Tuchman  China  Vietnam  Philippines  maritime  Asia_Pacific  sovereignty  conflicts  South_China_Sea 
january 2013 by jerryking
Making Every Shot Count
Summer 2009 | Ivey Intouch |

for Sabnam (Shaherose Charania)Expectations Valley Girl.
Ivey  alumni  magazines  Silicon_Valley  travel  Ghana  Vietnam  Cairo  Shanghai  web_video  Harry_Rosen  photography 
january 2013 by jerryking
Saigon, and on, and on
February 24, 2012 | globeadvisor.com | by Nancy Won.
Vietnam  Saigon  things_to_do  travel 
august 2012 by jerryking
'It Didn't Happen' - WSJ.com
July 26, 2007 | WSJ| By JAMES TARANTO.

"Well, look, if that's the criteria by which we are making decisions on the deployment of U.S. forces, then by that argument you would have 300,000 troops in the Congo right now -- where millions have been slaughtered as a consequence of ethnic strife -- which we haven't done," Mr. Obama told the AP. "We would be deploying unilaterally and occupying the Sudan, which we haven't done. Those of us who care about Darfur don't think it would be a good idea."

Mr. Obama is engaging in sophistry. By his logic, if America lacks the capacity to intervene everywhere there is ethnic killing, it has no obligation to intervene anywhere -- and perhaps an obligation to intervene nowhere. His reasoning elevates consistency into the cardinal virtue, making the perfect the enemy of the good.

Further, he elides the distinction between an act of omission (refraining from intervention in Congo and Darfur) and an act of commission (withdrawing from Iraq). The implication is that although the U.S. has had a military presence in Iraq since 1991, the fate of Iraqis is not America's problem.

Unlike his main rivals for the Democratic nomination, Mr. Obama has been consistent in opposing the liberation of Iraq.
Obama  Iraq  Vietnam  Laos  consistency  virtues  U.S.foreign_policy  national_interests  sophistry  values 
july 2012 by jerryking
Immigrant Businesses Gain an Edge - WSJ.com
March 20, 2007 | WSJ | By RAYMUND FLANDEZ.
Immigrants Gain Edge Doing Business Back Home
Knowledge of Culture, Personal Connections Help to Open Doors
immigrants  entrepreneur  Vietnam  Raymund_Flandez 
june 2012 by jerryking
Japan, Asean Talk Maritime Cooperation - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 30, 2011

Asian Bloc Agrees to Counter China Heft
By YOREE KOH
ASEAN  Japan  China  maritime  Southeast_Asia  Philippines  Vietnam  Indonesia  Thailand 
september 2011 by jerryking
Asia's New Arms Race - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 12, 2011 | | By AMOL SHARMA in New Delhi, JEREMY
PAGE in Beijing, JAMES HOOKWAY in Hanoi and RACHEL PANNETT in Canberra

As China grows wealthier and builds up its military, other nations in
the region are taking note—and amassing weapons of their own.
China  China_rising  India  Vietnam  Australia  maritime  arms_race 
february 2011 by jerryking
36 Hours in Hanoi - NYTimes.com
April 5, 2009 / New York Times / By NAOMI LINDT
Hanoi  Vietnam  travel  things_to_do 
november 2010 by jerryking
UNEASY ENGAGEMENT: China’s Export of Labor Faces Scorn
China, famous for its export of cheap goods, is increasingly
known for shipping out cheap labor. These global migrants often work in
factories or on Chinese-run construction and engineering projects,
though the range of jobs is astonishing: from planting flowers in the
Netherlands to doing secretarial tasks in Singapore to herding cows in
Mongolia — even delivering newspapers in the Middle East.

But a backlash against them has grown. Across Asia and Africa, episodes
of protest and violence against Chinese workers have flared. Vietnam and
India are among the nations that have moved to impose new labor rules
for foreign companies and restrict the number of Chinese workers allowed
to enter, straining relations with Beijing.
globalization  China  labour  business  Vietnam  Africa  migrants  backlash  Chinese 
december 2009 by jerryking
Switch to the low-income customer
14-Nov-2005 | Financial Times | By Jeremy Grant. "When AG
Lafley came in [in 2000] and said, 'We're going to serve the world's
consumers', that led us to say, 'We don't have the product strategy, the
cost structure, to be effective in serving lower income consumers'.
"What's happened in the last five years has been one of the most
dramatic transformations I've seen in my career. We now have all of our
functions focused on that," says Mr Daley. P&G, the world's largest
consumer goods company, devotes about 30 %of its $1.9bn in annual
research and development spending to low-income markets, a 50 % increase
from 5 yrs. ago. Consumer research: spend time in consumers' homes to
gain insights into daily habits; Cost innovation: use proprietary
technology to design low-income products; Innovation productivity: use
"matchmakers" such as InnoCentive; Manufacturing efficiency: cut mfg.
costs by developing a network of suppliers in China, Brazil, Vietnam and
India.
P&G  BRIC  market_research  consumer_research  primary_field_research  customer_insights  innovation  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  A.G._Lafley  InnoCentive  supply_chains  China  Brazil  Vietnam  India  observations  insights  cost-structure  jugaad  proprietary  behavioural  cost-cutting  match-making  CPG  low-income 
december 2009 by jerryking
In Vietnam, Symbols of Capitalism Falter - NYTimes.com
September 27, 2009 | New York Times | By SETH MYDANS. "As the
world economy contracts and markets disappear, crafts villages like this
have become an object lesson in the difficulties and the risks of
joining the global marketplace."
Vietnam  economic_downturn  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  globalization  risk-management 
september 2009 by jerryking

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