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jerryking : vijay_govindarajan   7

The Decline of the Baronial C.E.O. - The New York Times
By NELSON D. SCHWARTZJUNE 17, 2017

General Electric is just the latest storied name in corporate America to show its leader the door. Ford’s chief executive, Mark Fields, had been in the job for less than three years when he was fired in late May. Two weeks earlier, Mario Longhi of U.S. Steel abruptly stepped down. With these departures, the American era of the baronial chief executive, sitting atop an industrial dominion with all the attendant privileges, is drawing to a close.....Jeffrey Immelt tried to change G.E., yet couldn’t react quickly enough to the forces affecting companies like his......[(Amazon + Whole Foods) shows how] the digital age has upended the competitive landscape, pitting companies in vastly different industries against one another.

These include the rising power of activist investors, who buy up stakes in companies and then demand changes. Activists are now hunting much bigger game, demanding double-digit annual earnings growth in a stagnant economy. Or else.....Boards, too, have changed, evolving from country-club-like collections of the same familiar faces into a much more diverse and demanding constituency.....for most of the Fortune 500, the unquestioned power and perks, the imperviousness to criticism from the likes of shareholders, and the outsize public profile that once automatically came with the corner office have gone the way of the typewriter and the Dictaphone.....[today] ...wading into bitterly partisan public debates offers little upside for corporate leaders, and risks damage to their company’s reputation.

As a result, while companies in many ways have more economic and political power than ever, “chief executives now shy away from weighing in on the policy level or broader societal issues,” Mr. Sharer said. “They’re more focused on running their companies.”......Mr. Immelt’s exit leaves a void at the intersection of business and public policy,.....“If you start fooling around in Washington with the Business Roundtable or writing op-eds, activist investors will ask what you’re doing,”....[GE] became a natural target for activist investors. One of those was Nelson Peltz, a onetime corporate raider who relied on Michael R. Milken’s junk bonds for financing back in the 1980s.
CEOs  GE  executive_management  shareholder_activism  digital_disruption  Jeffrey_Immelt  disruption  technological_change  decline  Vijay_Govindarajan  boards_&_directors_&_governance 
june 2017 by jerryking
Karma Capitalism
OCTOBER 30, 2006 | BusinessWeek | Pete Engardio.

The swami's whirlwind East Coast tour was just one small manifestation of a significant but sometimes quirky new trend: Big Business is embracing Indian philosophy. Suddenly, phrases from ancient Hindu texts such as the Bhagavad Gita are popping up in management tomes and on Web sites of consultants. Top business schools have introduced "self-mastery" classes that use Indian methods to help managers boost their leadership skills and find inner peace in lives dominated by work.

More important, Indian-born strategists also are helping transform corporations. Academics and consultants such as C. K. Prahalad, Ram Charan, and Vijay Govindrajan are among the world's hottest business gurus. About 10% of the professors at places such as Harvard Business School, Northwestern's Kellogg School of Business, and the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business are of Indian descent--a far higher percentage than other ethnic groups. "When senior executives come to Kellogg, Wharton, Harvard, or [Dartmouth's] Tuck, they are exposed to Indian values that are reflected in the way we think and articulate," says Dipak C. Jain, dean of the Kellogg School.
capitalism  China  C.K._Prahalad  emotional_mastery  India  Indian-Americans  inner_peace  philosophy  Ram_Charan  self-mastery  Vijay_Govindarajan 
april 2012 by jerryking
How to Be Like Apple - WSJ.com
AUG. 29, 2011 | WSJ | RACHEL EMMA SILVERMAN. Driving
Innovation: Mgmt. experts say there are specific ways firms can generate
and execute new ideas. Solicit input. Great ideas come from all levels
of the organization, not just the top. Provide workers time for
"unofficial activity," set time to work on creative ideas. Executing
ideas is often tougher than generating them. Companies need a clear
process to prioritize, resource & test ideas quickly and cheaply, so
that they can afford to experiment...Observation can help companies
understand not just what people say they want, but what they really
need. Clay Christensen says P&G's new-product success rate in recent
yrs. came from observing that people were concerned about how their
clothes smell (Febreze) & were always looking for simpler ways to
clean the floor (Swiffer.). P&G overhauled its new-biz strategy
after realizing that just 15% of its ideas, developed in more of an
ad-hoc approach, were meeting revenue & profit targets.
Apple  innovation  execution  Vijay_Govindarajan  P&G  business_development  Clayton_Christensen  new_products  kill_rates  success_rates  systematic_approaches  ad_hoc  new_businesses  slack_time  companywide  observations  experimentation  primary_field_research  large_companies  Fortune_500  brands  unarticulated_desires  Michael_McDerment  ideas  idea_generation  process-orientation 
august 2011 by jerryking
How to Innovate After a Recession -
Sept. 7, 2010 | BusinessWeek | By Vijay Govindarajan who
outlines a 3-pronged plan for making innovation flourish in a
post-recession environment. Why can't organizations execute innovation,
especially Fortune 500 companies which have such vast resources and
capabilities? (1) The true challenge: execution. Business organizations
are not built for innovation, but for efficiency. Organizations today
are only modestly more prepared for the challenges of innovation than
they were 50 yrs. ago. While most companies have plenty of creativity
and technology, they lack the managerial skills to convert ideas into
reality.(2) Building a special project team. To be successful in
execution, each innovation initiative needs a special kind of team and a
special kind of plan.(3) Conducting the innovation experiment (i)
Formalize the experiment. (ii) Break down the hypothesis.(iii) Seek
the truth.
innovation  recessions  economic_downturn  Vijay_Govindarajan  experimentation  execution  Fortune_500 
september 2010 by jerryking
Vijay Govindarajan Pins Future Growth on Reverse Innovation
October 6, 2009 | — World Business Forum — Presented by Shell |
Vijay GovindarajanTo tap opportunities in emerging markets, companies
must excel at “reverse innovation”: develop products in countries like
China and India and then distribute them globally. Why? The fundamental
driver of reverse innovation is the income gap that exists between
emerging markets and the developed countries....Established automakers
are missing the opportunity. They have chartered their innovation
efforts for rich countries — and then offered the same cars, perhaps
de-featured to reduce costs somewhat, in poor countries....Yet far more
is at risk than missed opportunities for growth. Increasingly, success
in the developing world is a prerequisite to continued vitality at home.
In the transformed economic landscape, reverse innovation is not
optional — it is oxygen.
reverse_innovation  gurus  Vijay_Govindarajan  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  product_development  China  India  missed_opportunities  de-featured  automotive_industry  emerging_markets  developed_countries  jugaad  developing_countries 
may 2010 by jerryking
Innovate, Yes--But Where?
03.13.06 | Forbes | by Rich Karlgaard. "Today’s bestseller
list on management bursts with innovation-themed titles. Two I’ve read
and recommend are Geoffrey Moore’s Dealing With Darwin: How Great
Companies Innovate at Every Phase of Their Evolution and Vijay
Govindarajan and Chris Trimble’s 10 Rules for Strategic Innovators: From
Idea to Execution." Startups, I think, hold the best cards when it
comes to two types of innovation: technology and price. But incumbents
also have ample areas in which they can innovate. Consider these
examples: Cost Innovation, Logistics Innovation, Design Innovation,
Line-Extension Innovation, Data-Analysis Innovation,
innovation  howto  Rich_Karlgaard  Geoffrey_Moore  data_mining  design  branding  logistics  Vijay_Govindarajan  books  start_ups  costs  taxonomy 
october 2009 by jerryking
Recession Strategies: Companies Need to Focus on Future as Well as Present - WSJ.com
JUNE 22, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | Executive Briefing:

In Dr. Govindarajan’s three-box framework, Box One involves managing the present—for example, improving the efficiency of today’s businesses. Box Two involves selectively forgetting the past. And Box Three? That’s about creating the future. Often, Dr. Govindarajan maintains, companies spend too much of their time managing Box One—the present—and think that’s strategy. Instead, he argues, companies need to spend more time and energy on thinking about Box Two and Box Three.

Preparing for the Recovery
Despite the recession, companies must do more than just play defense.
When thinking about innovation, companies need to go beyond cost cutting
and spend more time thinking about what (Vijay Govindarajan) terms as
"Box Two and Box Three—selectively forgetting the past and creating the
future".

----
BUSINESS INSIGHT:Can companies really plan today for the year 2025?

DR. GOVINDARAJAN: You cannot plan for the year 2025, but you can prepare for it. There’s a big difference in my mind between planning for the future and preparing for it. Preparing for the future simply involves asking what the broad trends are. If people in your organization can at least have a shared perspective on some of the big, nonlinear shifts that may happen, you can begin to think about actions that may be relevant if such shifts occur—if say, technology in your business changes in certain ways. You want to do your current plan in a way that prepares your organization for the future.

The future is full of surprises; you know that. What you want is to be able to prepare to respond and adapt and benefit from surprises. And that’s what happens when you explicitly think about 2025 in 2009.
breakthroughs  contingency_planning  cost-cutting  economic_downturn  far-sightedness  foresight  forward_looking  high-risk  innovation  large_payoffs  nonlinear  offensive_tactics  recessions  scenario-planning  strategy  surprises  Vijay_Govindarajan 
june 2009 by jerryking

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