recentpopularlog in

jerryking : wef_davos   5

The networker: Martin Sorrell of WPP - FT.com
March 13, 2015| FT | Andrew Hill.

After 30 years, WPP now embraces some of the best-known names in marketing, advertising and public relations, including Ogilvy & Mather, J Walter Thompson and Burson-Marsteller.
In the process, Sorrell has become one of the best-connected executives in the world....Sorrell performs a similar role at WPP, using a combination of visionary pronouncements and obsessive micromanagement of clients, finances and employees. ....later this year a new chairman, Roberto Quarta, will take over. Quarta, a tough Italian-American with a background in private equity, is expected to be less submissive to WPP’s chief executive than previous chairmen. The question of how long Sorrell ­continues in his role, who could succeed him, and what will happen to the WPP empire if he goes, will be the most important issue on Quarta’s desk....“[If] I have been behaving as an owner, rather than as a ‘highly paid manager’ . . . mea culpa. I thought that was the object of the exercise,” he wrote.
Martin_Sorrell  WPP  advertising  advertising_agencies  succession  deal-making  WEF_Davos  legacies  JWT  Ogilvy_&_Mather  owners  Burson-Marsteller 
march 2015 by jerryking
The changing face of employment - FT.com
January 30, 2015 12:41 pm
The changing face of employment
Gillian Tett

One widely cited statistic at the World Economic Forum was a projection that automation would end up replacing some 45 per cent of jobs in the US in the next 20 years. And the consensus was that it would be the middle tier of jobs that would disappear. The future of employment — at least according to Davos — is a world bifurcated between low-skilled, low-paid service jobs (say, dog walkers and cleaners) and highly skilled elite roles (computer programmers, designers and all the other jobs that Davos luminaries do). Everything else is potentially vulnerable....What is still critically unclear is how all this investment in infrastructure and training is going to be paid for. Philanthropy? Taxes? It is also unclear how mass access to the internet will recreate those disappearing mid-tier jobs. Given that, it is perhaps no surprise that when I asked a group of Davos grandees for a show of hands on whether income inequality would get worse in the coming years, almost everybody in the room voted “yes” — without hesitation. That is deeply sobering.
Gillian_Tett  WEF_Davos  highly_skilled  innovation  unemployment  mobile_phones  Erik_Brynjolfsson  automation  Andrew_McAfee  middle_class  job_destruction  job_displacement  downward_mobility  hollowing_out  MIT 
january 2015 by jerryking
Laurence Fink’s Optimistic Outlook - WSJ
Jan. 30, 2015 | WSJ | Op-ed

BlackRock manages $4.65 trillion worth of assets (as of the last quarter)—the investments of individuals, governments, pension funds and other global institutions. His firm advised the Federal Reserve and the Treasury Department during the 2008 financial crisis, and since then, he has spent more time advising the public sector, sharing his views and predictions with the Obama administration and world leaders...BlackRock has more than 12,000 employees and more than 135 investment teams. They manage the portfolios of more than 7,700 clients, from sovereign-wealth funds to college endowments to corporations.....China is starting to provide more public-supported pensions and health care, but “it’s a fraction of what it should be,” Mr. Fink says. He is encouraged by China’s proposed fiscal reforms, such as steps to shift the country’s debt burden toward the central government, away from local authorities, improving efficiency.....Fink believes that many people haven’t paid enough attention to the displacement caused by technology. “Think of all the people who used to be in agriculture, and now it’s all mechanized,” he says. To offset this shift, Mr. Fink thinks that governments should invest in infrastructure to provide jobs and create capital. He also thinks that successful countries will train workers to be able to do skilled jobs, such as writing computer code or building machines.
Laurence_Fink  BlackRock  WEF_Davos  op-ed  optimism  job_destruction  job_displacement 
january 2015 by jerryking
Schumpeter: The network effect
Jan 17th 2015 | The Economist| Anonymous.

How does one make the most of a networking opportunity, whether it is in a charming village in the Swiss Alps or in the conference hall of a soulless hotel next to a motorway? The first principle for would-be networkers is to abandon all shame. Be flagrant in your pursuit of the powerful and the soon-to-be-powerful, and when you have their attention, praise them to the skies...But shamelessness needs to be balanced with subtlety. Pretend to disagree with your interlocutor before coming around to his point of view; that gives him a sense of mastery. Discover similar interests or experiences. Go out of your way to ask for help. Lending a helping hand allows a powerful person to exercise his power while also burnishing his self-esteem....The second principle is that you must have something to say. Success comes from having a well-stocked mind, not just a well-thumbed Rolodex....Go to the main sessions and ask sensible questions. Reward the self-styled “thought leaders” in each session by adding them to your Twitter “follow” list....The third principle is that you need to work hard at networking. Swot up in advance on the most important people who will be at an event. If you manage to meet them, follow up with an e-mail and a suggestion to meet again...successful networkers must be calculating, ruthless and shameless, they do better when they somehow make it all seem spontaneous, accidental even (Sprezzaturra)...One of the best guidebooks on this subject, by Keith Ferrazzi, is called “Never Eat Alone”.
howto  Communicating_&_Connecting  networking  shamelessness  Davos  conferences  preparation  WEF_Davos  WEF  books  Keith_Ferrazzi  asking_for_help  first_principle  disagreements  soulless 
january 2015 by jerryking
Larry Summers Says "Tiger Mom" Amy Chua May Be Wrong - Davos Live - WSJ
January 27, 2011 By Jon Hilsenrath

His own children would be shocked to hear it, Mr. Summers said, but maybe Ms. Chua is wrong.

“In a world where things that require discipline and steadiness can be done increasingly by computers, is the traditional educational emphasis on discipline, accuracy and successful performance and regularity really what we want?” he asked. Creativity, he said, might be an even more valuable asset that educators and parents should emphasize. At Harvard, he quipped, the A students tend to become professors and the C students become wealthy donors.

“It is not entirely clear that your veneration of traditional academic achievement is exactly well placed,” he said to Ms. Chua. “Which two freshmen at Harvard have arguably been most transformative of the world in the last 25 years?” he asked. “You can make a reasonable case for Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg, neither of whom graduated.” Demanding tiger moms, he said, might not be very supportive of their kids dropping out of school.
Amy_Chua  billgates  WEF_Davos  education  Harvard  Larry_Summers  Mark_Zuckerberg  parenting  Tiger_Moms  commoditization_of_information  creativity  academic_achievement 
january 2011 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read