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jerryking : walter_bagehot   9

Bagehot by James Grant — an engaging biography of a purveyor of punditry
August 2, 2019 | Financial Times | by John Plender

Bagehot: The Life and Times of the Greatest Victorian, by James Grant, WW Norton, RRP£19.99/$28.95, 368 pages
19th_century  biographies  books  book_reviews  economics  financial_crises  financial_history  journalists  magazines  paradoxes  politicaleconomy  pundits  Victorian  Walter_Bagehot 
august 2019 by jerryking
On the money: a history of the Bank of England
SEPTEMBER 1, 2017 by: John Plender, the FT columnist and author of ‘Capitalism: Money, Morals and Markets’ (Biteback)

Till Time’s Last Sand: A History of the Bank of England 1694-2013, by David Kynaston, Bloomsbury £35, 896 pages
An enduring theme is the friction that existed from the outset between the Bank and its main client, the government. The Bank’s original charter was granted so that it could provide finance for the Nine Years’ War against France. On each renewal, the terms were the subject of much haggling and in the interim the Bank was constantly pressed to advance more money than it felt prudent. ....Another constant theme is forgery and fraud, with some of the Bank’s most senior employees being caught with their fingers in the till. In marked contrast to today’s post-crisis financial world, punishment was harsh. Many miscreants were hanged at Tyburn while the lucky ones were condemned to transportation.

As the 19th century progresses, Kynaston’s story turns increasingly on the issue that preoccupied great Victorian writers on monetary policy such as Henry Thornton and Walter Bagehot: how to reconcile adherence to the gold standard with financial stability. Numerous financial crises, including those surrounding the rescue of Barings and the collapse of Overend Gurney and the City of Glasgow Bank, are retold here with panache.
Bank_of_England  history  central_banks  book_reviews  books  monetary_policy  slavery  Walter_Bagehot  financial_history  19th_century  Victorian  financial_crises 
september 2017 by jerryking
Yale to Build Tool Offering Real-Time Lessons on Financial Crises -
May 9, 2017 | WSJ | By Gabriel T. Rubin.

Yale University will launch an online platform to provide real-time support to policy makers dealing with financial crises, with the help of a $10 million gift from business leaders and philanthropists Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Peter G. Peterson Foundation.

The gift represents a major expansion of the Yale Program on Financial Stability, a degree-granting program in the university’s school of management that aims to train early- and midcareer financial regulators from around the globe.

The new resources will support a small staff of researchers, led by Professor Andrew Metrick, as they build a database of “lessons from hundreds of interventions from past crises,” the university said. The effort is the first of its kind, according to Yale, and reflects a need for more research on “wartime” situations, rather than the preventive sort of regulatory research done by central banks around the world. Central banks often avoid extensive crisis preparations out of reluctance to promote moral hazard, leaving policy makers to reinvent the wheel each time a new crisis arises.....Mr. Geithner, who serves as the chairman of the Program on Financial Stability, said that he and other policy makers would have been able to act faster and with greater confidence during the financial crisis with access to the tools that Mr. Metrick’s team will build.

“There were probably four or five periods when the crisis was escalating, the panic was spreading, sitting on the phone for 20 hours a day trying to figure out how to do things,” Mr. Geithner recalled. “And we hadn’t had to do some of those things since the Great Depression. That took us a lot of time, and that can be costly.”

The open online platform will include descriptions of specific interventions—for example, the use of a “bad bank” to hold distressed assets—and will detail what did and didn’t work well in each case.
Yale  Colleges_&_Universities  crisis  regulators  Walter_Bagehot  central_banks  real-time  databases  lessons_learned  policy_tools  Peter_Peterson  reinventing_the_wheel  policymakers  confidence  economic_downturn  decision_making  speed  the_Great_Depression  crisis_management  crisis_response  Tim_Geithner  moral_hazards  financial_crises 
may 2017 by jerryking
Great Thoughts, and Woolly Ones - WSJ.com
Nov. 7, 2002 | WSJ | By Mark Miller.

The 19th-century essayist Walter Bagehot took a contrarian's view of high culture. "The essence of civilization," he wrote, "is dullness." Indeed, civilization is "only an elaborate invention . . . for abolishing the fierce passions, the unchastened enjoyments . . . the excitements of a barbarous age, and to substitute for them indoor pleasures, placid feelings, and rational amusements."

As an advertisement for the pleasures of the mind, Bagehot's judgment may not be likely to win many converts, but it suggests why we still need that somewhat outdated life form known as the critic. Mere reviewers can keep the arts (and book) pages supplied with copy. But they can have little effect on the quality of our minds or our culture, as a trip to any neighborhood multiplex will make clear. We rely on the true critic to cultivate our intelligence, refine our tastes and show us the way to higher pleasures.
art_reviews  constructive_criticism  criticism  review  Walter_Bagehot  curation 
december 2013 by jerryking
The Unwisdom of Crowds
12/22/2008 | The Weekly Standard Vol. 014, Issue 14 | by
Christopher Caldwell. Financial panics still require what Walter
Bagehot prescribed--that practical men violate their own principles.
Common sense is often not much use in a financial panic. This was the
great discovery of Walter Bagehot, the prolific 19th-century essayist
and journalist, who was editor of the Economist from 1860 to 1877. (His
name rhymes with gadget.) in the so-called Anglo-Saxon world, Bagehot's
book still provides the bedrock of policy thinking during financial
emergencies, including our present one.
bailouts  banking  banks  capitalism  economics  economy  finance  financial_crises  financial_history  financial_journalism  panics  policymaking  politicaleconomy  prolificacy  Walter_Bagehot 
october 2009 by jerryking
Central Banks Are Creatures of Financial Crises
JANUARY 27, 2009 WSJ op-ed by JUSTIN LAHART provides an
overview of three centuries of central-banking history. Central banks
have been built on financial crises, with each major tremor expanding
their role. And today's economic convulsions foreshadow more changes to
come at the Fed.
backward_looking  central_banks  crisis  economics  economists  financial  financial_history  foreshadowing  institutions  U.S._Federal_Reserve  Walter_Bagehot  financial_crises 
january 2009 by jerryking

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