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jerryking : waterfront_toronto   6

Port Lands: $1.2b of Trilateral Funding Unlocks Revitalization | Urban Toronto
June 28, 2017 3:50 pm | by Stefan Novakovic.

Three levels of government are committing $1.185 billion of new funding to remake what Waterfront Toronto describes as "one of North America's largest underused urban areas." The investment will fund the much-needed Port Lands Flood Protection Project (PLFPP), unlocking the ambitious reinvention of the 365 hectare (880 acre) Port Lands.

While the mostly vacant and partly de-industrialized Port Lands have long been fodder for blue-sky thinking—once touted as the site of a potential Olympic bid, and more recently Expo 2025—some 290 hectares (715 acres) of the area are currently at risk of flooding. Any visions of the future are contingent on the funding that was finally secured today. Joined by Mayor John Tory and Premier Kathleen Wynne, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau lead the way in announcing a Federal contribution of up to $384 million......Two new naturalized outlets for the Don River will be created, with the waterway—surrounded by the river beds' flood-protecting greenery—carving out the new Villiers Island, which is envisioned as a dense urban entry point to the Port Lands.

Alongside the naturalized river beds, 13 acres of wetlands will be introduced throughout the Port Lands, creating a resilient and sustainable urban environment. In total, 29 hectares of naturalized greens are are planned—including coastal wetlands—as well as 16 acres of parkland, and 14 acres of in-water aquatic habitat. The new waterways will also add 1,000 metres of naturalized river.
Waterfront_Toronto  revitalization  waterfronts  John_Tory  Justin_Trudeau  Kathleen_Wynne  Toronto  floods  Don_River  Port_Lands  wetlands  flood_protection  property_development 
june 2017 by jerryking
Hidden landmarks: Why Toronto is at the forefront of the landscape architecture movement - The Globe and Mail
May. 01 2015 | The Globe and Mail | ALEX BOZIKOVIC.

The history of Toronto's University Avenue: The landscape designer André Parmentier planted the avenue in 1829; it was reshaped in the 1920s in the Beaux-Arts style; and in the 1960s, the current landscape was designed by the British-born architect Howard Dunington-Grubb to cap the newly built subway. It includes perennials, statues and vent stacks.

What is clear to Mr. Birnbaum – a century and a half of design ideas – is invisible to most of us, part of the scenery. That is the plight of landscape architecture, and this is what Mr. Birnbaum’s group is hoping to change: to make familiar the idea of a “cultural landscape” as something to be seen, valued and protected by the general public. As he puts it, “We’re making visible the often-invisible hand of the landscape architect.”

What exactly is a “cultural landscape”? It can be a street or a waterfront, designed or inherited. But most often it means a designed outdoor space, the work of landscape architects who deal with urban and ecological lenses, as well as vegetation and the formal design of plazas, streets and other outdoor spaces...Waterfront Toronto: In remaking 800 hectares of the industrial waterfront, that agency has brought together some of the best landscape architects in the world to remake the topography and to set a high standard for the urban fabric it is building....Parks matter! Parks generate real-estate value and, more importantly, a sense of place. As Mr. Birnbaum points out, the waterfront parks “were built first, communicating what the quality of life will be along the waterfront. We think it sets an enviable standard, and that’s why we will be bringing people from all over the globe to see the landscapes and to discuss these issues.”
Toronto  landmarks  landscapes  architecture  design  parks  waterfronts  Waterfront_Toronto  history  public_spaces  quality_of_life 
may 2015 by jerryking
Waterfront Toronto’s ‘innovation centre’ plans unveiled - The Globe and Mail
ELIZABETH CHURCH - CITY HALL BUREAU CHIEF
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 06 2015,
Toronto  waterfronts  innovation  real_estate  Waterfront_Toronto 
february 2015 by jerryking
Canary District looks beyond the Pan Am Games - The Globe and Mail
SHELLEY WHITE

The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Jun. 25 2012

“We're going to create the most sustainable mixed-use development that the city has ever seen,” said Jason Lester, president of Dundee Kilmer Development Limited, the real estate developer leading the creation of the “Canary District” – named after the now-closed Canary Restaurant that operated from a 19th century Cherry Street building since the 1960s.

Their task is twofold. First, the Ontario government has given Dundee Kilmer the job of creating housing for 10,000 athletes and coaches for the 2015 Pan American Games. But the end goal goes far beyond a sporting event. The buildings will be converted and sold as condo and townhouse units, creating the foundation of a new downtown east side community that will knit together other communities such as St. Lawrence Market, Corktown and the Distillery District.
commercial_real_estate  Toronto  Canary_District  Waterfront_Toronto  19th_century  property_development  St._Lawrence_Market  Corktown  Distillery_District 
june 2012 by jerryking

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