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Compliance with the Produce Traceability Initiative
August 13, 2013 | Food Safety Magazine |By David Freed.

The Product Traceability Initiative (PTI) was created by the Produce Marketing Association, Canadian Produce Marketing Association and the United Fresh Produce Association, in conjunction with the produce industry (suppliers, retailers, wholesalers, foodservice). The initiative envisions supply chain-wide adoption of electronic traceability for every case of fresh produce shipped for consumers.

Standard identification allows members of the produce supply chain to easily scan, obtain and register the data encoded in the bar code. In case of a recall, the source and span of affected produce can be quickly identified to reduce human risk. Products unaffected by recalls can be easily separated toreduce business risk.

Barcode print quality is fundamental to accurate identification. If a barcode doesn’t scan, packagers and retail customers must manually type in the human readable numbers. This process is time-consuming and prone to input errors. Retailers may reject cases that do not have clear bar codes and some may reject full pallets, leading to costly rework and possibly lost merchandise.
traceability  fresh_produce  compliance  food_safety  Waudware 
july 2014 by jerryking
Cost of Non-Compliance for DOT Regulations
Tweak towards Cost of non-Compliance for food traceability regulations
presentations  Waudware 
july 2014 by jerryking
The Value of Project Management
Define the ROI. “Every project plan should begin with an explanation of the business value that project brings
to your organization,” says Mr. Kasabian. That measure can be
used to decide first whether the project should move forward and
later as a metric to determine whether the project brought strategic value to the business.

Manage what’s measured. The way to get the most value out of a project management methodology is through metrics, says Mr. Brodnik. “Focus on measures and processes tied to
business goals, collect the data and make it available to everyone,” he says. “When people know what’s being watched, they put more time and focus on it.”
project_management  McKinsey  WaudWare  measurements 
april 2014 by jerryking
Master these 10 processes to sharpen your project management skills - TechRepublic
we're going to focus on 10 basic areas:

Define the project
Plan the work
Manage the workplan
Manage issues
Manage scope
Manage risks
Manage communication
Manage documentation
Manage quality
Manage metrics
communicating_risks  detail_oriented  project_management  WaudWare 
april 2014 by jerryking
Basecamp ID
WaudWare Incorporated
You've just linked up another account to your Basecamp ID.

This Basecamp account (WaudWare Incorporated) is now linked to your Basecamp ID. nn

Your Basecamp ID username is:
...
passwords  Waudware  project_management  Basecamp 
march 2014 by jerryking
Great Hackers
(Charles Waud & WaudWare. Can Waudware develop on a different platform, enabling 3rd parties to develop for it? Would that make PICs more commercially appealing?)

There's no controversy about which idea is most controversial: the suggestion that variation in wealth might not be as big a problem as we think.

I didn't say in the book that variation in wealth was in itself a good thing. I said in some situations it might be a sign of good things. [JCK: that is,....it might be a "signal"] A throbbing headache is not a good thing, but it can be a sign of a good thing-- for example, that you're recovering consciousness after being hit on the head.

Variation in wealth can be a sign of variation in productivity. (In a society of one, they're identical.) And that is almost certainly a good thing: if your society has no variation in productivity, it's probably not because everyone is Thomas Edison. It's probably because you have no Thomas Edisons.

In a low-tech society you don't see much variation in productivity....In programming, as in many fields, the hard part isn't solving problems, but deciding what problems to solve. Imagination is hard to measure, but in practice it dominates the kind of productivity that's measured in lines of code.

Productivity varies in any field, but there are few in which it varies so much (as software development)..This is an area where managers can make a difference. Like a parent saying to a child, I bet you can't clean up your whole room in ten minutes, a good manager can sometimes redefine a problem as a more interesting one.
coding  discernment  hackers  imagination  income_distribution  income_inequality  Paul_Graham  productivity  productivity_payoffs  programming  signals  software_developers  software_development  Thomas_Edison  variations  WaudWare  worthwhile_problems 
february 2014 by jerryking
Top tips for porting an application to a computing infrastructure
22 May 2013| Software Sustainability Institute | By Mike Jackson
tips  software  porting  Waudware 
february 2014 by jerryking
How Big Data Is Changing Food Consumption
March 7, 2013 | | SmartData Collective

big data food consumptionby Ana Andreescu from GoodData
massive_data_sets  mobile_applications  policy  food  Waudware  OPMA  fresh_produce 
december 2013 by jerryking
Leafy Greens Cause the Most Illnesses—Mushrooms, the Least
January 30, 2013 | Business Week |By Venessa Wong.

The average American eats only 4 pounds of mushrooms each year, compared to 30 lbs. of lettuce.

Also, greens such as lettuce and spinach cause illness more frequently because they are consumed more often, not because they are grown or harvested in a riskier way than other vegetables...In fact, the problem with leafy greens has less to do with farming than with handling. Many were tainted with norovirus, which causes stomach flu, and “were most often contaminated during preparation or service by a sick food handler,” the report found. Infected persons are contagious “from the moment they begin feeling sick until at least three days after they recover” and can spread the virus through vomit and stool, according to the CDC.
illness  fresh_produce  product_recalls  Waudware  salads  CDC  food_safety  mushrooms  traceability  viruses 
april 2013 by jerryking
HOW TO SELL FRESH PRODUCE TO SUPERMARKET CHAINS
March 1999 | | Bobby G. Beamer, Adjunct Professor, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Virginia Tech.

The most common approach to penetrating the fresh produce market has been to identify market windows created by seasonal production variations in major production areas. To attract buyers, local producers have attempted to fill market windows left open by established marketing channels. This production
approach to marketing fails to consider the needs of their customers: the retail supermarkets and their buyers.
However, by adopting a marketing approach , growers can establish better long-term relationships with their customers and capture more benefits than merely competing with other producing regions on price. Marketing efforts must begin before production as growers learn about buyers` needs and
requirements, including grade, quality, packaging, and delivery, in addition to learning which individual produce items are needed. The marketing approach, then, requires that growers produce what they can sell rather than trying to sell what they have produced. With the emphasis on variety in the produce section, Virginia growers may find more production opportunities in the specialty item category than by attempting to meet the shortages created by seasonal production
variations.

the average produce department in 1994 occupied 12 percent of the total store space but generated almost 17 percent of the average profits for the store. Previous research (Runyan, et al .) identified the following problems that can hinder the development of a good relationship between buyers and producers:
∑ lack of consistent quality,
∑ uneven sizing and grading,
∑ product too mature,
∑ lack of advance notice of product availability,
∑ inadequate removal of field heat, and
∑ lack of organization among local growers.

CONCLUSIONS
This study confirms the conditions for market entry described by Ryan, et al .: consistent grading for quality, even sizing, proper product maturity; removal of field heat; anticipated arrivals; and grower organizations. Merchandisers stressed the importance of good relationships, stating that new producers would have a hard time penetrating the market because of the loyalty factor established between growers and buyers. Part of this relationship is that ì. . . even at a cheaper price, itís going to be hard to pry us away from [our usual suppliers] because they provide consistent size, color, packing, and delivery. If we call them up and say that weíre short and need another truck load, theyíll have it here for us this
afternoon.îThe existence of these relationships emphasizes the need for the producer to get to know the market.
Rather than trying to compete with existing relationships, producers need to identify commodities having inconsistent supplies or poorly established supply relationships.

During interviews, produce merchandisers consistently expressed doubts about the willingness of small-scale, local produce growers to adopt practices conducive to the establishment of relationships . Although small-scale producers lack the economies of size that enable large-scale producers to invest in equipment and facilities, new institutions, such as the shipping-point markets, may provide small firms with the support needed to establish market relationships. However, such marketing support may be coming at the wrong end of the production process. Traditionally, fruit and vegetable growers, like many people involved in agricultural production, view their role primarily as commodity producers. The primary emphasis is placed on producing a good product, while marketing is viewed as strictly a post-harvest activity. One merchandiser related the story of a new producer who grew several acres of Daikon, a large, hot Japanese radish. The producer was disappointed to discover that after harvesting the crop no one was interested in purchasing it. Such a problem could have been avoided if the grower had invested some time, prior to production, in market research. Unfortunately, many producers still follow this approach in the production and marketing of fresh fruits and vegetables
fresh_produce  supermarkets  grocery  howto  market_windows  statistics  profitability  barriers_to_entry  farming  agriculture  Virginia  decision_trees  WaudWare  OPMA 
april 2013 by jerryking
Surprise business result? Explore whether it is a hidden opportunity
June 18, 2007 | G&M pg. B8 | George Stalk Jr.

What does it take to capitalize on anomalies systematically?

For starters, you need to have metrics and information systems that are sufficiently refined to identify anomalies in the first place. Knowing the average margins and market share isn’t enough; look at the entire range of outcomes—across customers, geographies, products, and the like. This allows you to surface out-of-the-ordinary results for closer inspection.

The next step is to separate wheat from chaff: those anomalies that signal a potential business opportunity from those that are merely one-time events. The key is to examine the pattern of unusual performance over time. The customer who consistently buys high volumes or the market that outperforms the average year after year are, by definition, not random. Is there an underlying cause that can be identified and then replicated elsewhere?

Finally, you need to understand the precise mechanisms that animate the anomalies you identify. Why is the unusual pattern of performance happening? What specific features of the product or the local environment or the customer experience are bringing it about? Don’t accept the usual first-order explanations. It’s not enough to know that a particular customer has been loyal for years; find out precisely why.

It’s up to senior management to create the forum for asking why and to persist until the question is answered with genuine insight.
metrics  George_Stalk_Jr.  BCG  anomalies  growth  opportunities  customer_insights  surprises  systematic_approaches  quizzes  ratios  pattern_recognition  insights  questions  first-order  second-order  OPMA  Waudware  curiosity  new_businesses  one-time_events  signals  noise  overlooked_opportunities  latent  hidden  averages  information_systems  assessments_&_evaluations  randomness  5_W’s 
january 2013 by jerryking
UNPRECEDENTED VOLATILITY A HALLMARK OF AGRICULTURE’S NEW AGE
* Have a plan for the future – perhaps a surprise to some, but many farmers don’t have a plan in place that paints a vision for where they want to take their operation over the next 2, 5 and 10 years.
• Have credit in place before it is actually required – it is human nature to leave things to the last minute.
• Implement a sound hedging strategy – in addition to the system of crop insurance in place in this country, there are many ways that Canadian farmers can take actions to manage their risk. Diversifying into new businesses is one example.
• Well-managed risk can pay off – at the same time, taking on some risk that is prudent and ts the risk pro le of the farming operation can pay off handsomely for farmers. In such a volatile and fast paced environment, there are bound to be some buying and selling opportunities that open up. Knowing when to take advantage of them can separate successful farms with those that muddle along.
• Know your costs – many producers have a good sense of how their top line is performing. But it is just as impor-tant to have a good understanding of the cost side of the equation.
• Maintain adequate liquidity and reasonable leverage – in order to mitigate the risks associated with increasing asset prices, it would be prudent for farmers to ensure that they have sufficient liquidity and manageable leverage if they are expanding.
• Use reasonable interest rate assumptions in assessing investment opportunities – even though borrowing costs are unusually low, farmers must be mindful of the fact that this low-rate environment won’t last forever.
agriculture  uncertainty  volatility  farming  liquidity  leverage  hedging  futures_contracts  diversification  new_businesses  risks  risk-management  risk-taking  OPMA  WaudWare  interest_rates  vision  long-term  never_forever  business_planning  credit  costs  anticipating  risk-mitigation  low-interest  cost-consciousness 
may 2012 by jerryking
Keys to a successful marketing campaign
Sept. 12, 2011 |G&M|Harvey Schachter.

Consider this article for Virgina of Fayeclack Communications

Marketing guidelines:1. Be noticeable: Engage consumers.Get them to think about your brand. 2. Be insight-based: Impactful campaigns must resonate with
some insight - a compelling, original observation about consumers or the
product category, based on research or chatting with consumers. 3. Be
memorable : Your ad must be remembered, e.g. Apple's 1984 ad jabbing at
IBM. 4. Be branded: It's important consumers remember the brand, and
that the ad supports & reinforces it. 5. Be "campaignable": A
single ad is not a campaign, but if effective should lead to one. 6. Be
differentiated: It's not enough to be remembered & to send a msg.
about being good - est. why your brand is better than its competition.7.
Be motivating to get people to actually do something.8 Be ethical:
Advertising is viewed with suspicion, so be above board. 9. Be
financially sustainable10. Be integrated: Able to deliver your msg. in a
complementary way through the various media.
marketing  ksfs  branding  Harvey_Schachter  campaigns  cross-platform  advertising  Waudware  insights  engagement  Apple  IBM 
september 2011 by jerryking
After 50 years, Journal enters weekend fray
Monday, September 12, 2005 G&M article by SHAWN MCCARTHY.
Adopt to understand how to offer analysis and context. "The key to
success for The Wall Street Journal or any business publication is to
provide context and analysis, to explore trends in the financial world,
and to profile decision makers,""Our whole goal is to be a lighthouse as
opposed to a street light; to show people where things are going and
not where they are."
analysis  WSJ  Trends  newspapers  HeyMath  mathematics  contextual  Waudware  thought_leadership 
february 2009 by jerryking

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