recentpopularlog in

jerryking : west_point   11

Opinion | Mike Pompeo: Last in His Class at West Point in Integrity
Nov. 18, 2019 | The New York Times | By Thomas L. Friedman

....Pompeo has just violated one of the cardinal rules of American military ethics and command: You look out for your soldiers, you don’t leave your wounded on the battlefield and you certainly don’t stand mute when you know a junior officer is being railroaded by a more senior commander, if not outright shot in her back.........Pompeo instead let his ambassador to Ukraine — who depended on him for protection — be stabbed in her back with a Twitter knife, wielded by the president, rather than tell Trump: “Sorry, Mr. President, if you fire her, I will resign. Because to do otherwise would be unjust and against my values and character — and because I would lose the loyalty of all my diplomats if I silently went along with such a travesty of justice against a distinguished 33-year veteran of the foreign service.”............“For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, but lose his soul?” — Mark 8:36......As two now retired, longtime State Department diplomats, Aaron David Miller and Richard Sokolsky, wrote on CNN.com on Saturday, “At the very least, Pompeo enabled the smear campaign to go unchallenged, acquiesced in the Giuliani back-channel effort with Ukraine and failed to say a word in defense of Bill Taylor, George Kent or Marie Yovanovitch. These are breathtaking acts of craven political cowardice and beneath the dignity of any secretary of state.”

Mike Pompeo: Last in his class at West Point on ethics in leadership.........Reporters and columnists need to ask Pompeo every chance they get: “What moral code are you operating by that would justify such behavior?’’.....it’s now clear that Pompeo had not taken an oath to defend and protect the Constitution. He took an oath to defend and protect Donald J. Trump and Pompeo’s own future political career — above all else — and that’s exactly what he’s been doing. Shame on him.
character_traits  conspiracies  cowardice  diplomacy  disinformation  Donald_Trump  ethics  integrity  leadership  Michael_Pompeo  moral_codes  political_expediency  principles  scriptures  Tom_Friedman  Ukraine  U.S._State_Department  U.S.foreign_policy  values  West_Point 
november 2019 by jerryking
The Economics of Surveillance - Digits - WSJ
Sep 28, 2012 | WSJ | By Jennifer Valentino-DeVries.

surveillance has crept into people’s lives gradually as computers have become more efficient and cheaper – and as data analysis has become more enticing. The price for businesses to store and use a gigabyte of information for a year dropped from $18.95 in 2005 to $1.68 in 2012, and it’s expected to drop to just 66 cents in 2015, says market research firm IDC....The average price of a cellphone has increased 17% over the past 10 years – but processing capability has increased by 13,000% in that same time, ABI says. This allows phones to do things such as shoot video, get email and locate the user on a map, but it also means the devices store a lot of information about people that can be collected and tracked.

“Nowadays cellphones are sensors,” said says Col. Lisa Shay, a professor of electrical engineering at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point who studies tracking technology. “You’re now carrying a personal sensor with you at all times.”
surveillance  massive_data_sets  privacy  data  sensors  digital_storage  economics  West_Point 
january 2014 by jerryking
The Broadwell Recognition | Daniel W. Drezner
indecorous

the David Petraeus/Paula Broadwell story is the ultimate pundit Rorschach Test. Whatever axe one had to grind against the foreign policy community prior to the story breaking, Petraeus and Broadwell merely sharpens it. It’s evidence about the sexism and double-standards at play in Washington! It shows the insularity and kiss-assedness of the foreign policy community!! It shows that COIN doesn’t work, or that Petraeus was a big phony!!

....a lesson that can be drawn from this for those young, impressionistic aspirants to positions of foreign policy influence......do not, under any circumstances, think of a Ph.D. as merely a box to be checked on the way to power and influence in Washington....... Petraeus both benefited from and propagated the desire to develop "officer-intellectuals" within the military........West Point’s social science department, where Petraeus had taught in the mid-1980s. The department, known as “Sosh,” was founded just after World War II by a visionary ex-cadet and Rhodes Scholar named George A. “Abe” Lincoln. Toward the end of the war, as the senior planning aide to Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Marshall, Lincoln realized that the Army needed to breed a new type of officer to help the nation meet its new global responsibilities in the postwar era. This new officer, he wrote to a colleague, should have “at least three heads—one political, one economic, and one military.” He took a demotion, from brigadier general to colonel, so he could return to West Point and create a curriculum “to improve the so-called Army mind” in just this way: a social science department, encouraging critical thinking, even occasionally dissent.

Lincoln also set up a program allowing cadets with high scores in Sosh classes to go study at a civilian graduate school, with West Point paying the tuition. In exchange, the cadets, after earning their doctorates, would come back and teach for at least three years. Once they fulfilled that obligation, Lincoln would use his still-considerable connections in Washington to get them choice assignments in the Pentagon, the State Department, the White House, a foreign embassy, or a prestigious command post......some scholar-officers rate as being among the best that the military has to offer, and offer a necessary bridge between the scholarly and martial worlds. On the other hand, some of them are there precisely because they see the Ph.D. as a ticket to be punched on the way to something greater. And these are the ones who will usually flail about miserably.......Here's the thing about sub-par doctoral students: 95% of them will not earn a Ph.D. — and most of the rest who do get it will only have done so by finding the most pliant dissertation committee alive. Ambition and intelligence can get someone through college and a professional degree. It can even get someone through Ph.D.-level coursework. What it can’t do is produce an above-the-bar dissertation......For people who have succeeded at pretty much everything in life to that point, a Ph.D. seems like just another barrier to transcend. It’s not. Unless you are able to simultaneously love and critically dissect your subject matter, unless you thrive in an environment where people are looking forward to picking apart your most cherished ideas, you won’t finish......As someone who has advised readers on the relative merits of getting a Ph.D., it’s worth pointing out — repeatedly — that getting a Ph.D. is not for everyone. If there isn’t an idea or a question that truly animates you, if you think of a Ph.D. as merely a ticket to be punched, then know the following: you are looking at a half-decade of misery with nothing to show for it in the end except a terminal masters degree.
academia  Colleges_&_Universities  David_Petraeus  fast_track  high-achieving  invitation-only  KSG  leadership  leadership_development  lessons_learned  overambitious  Paula_Broadwell  PhDs  scandals  scholars  scholar-officers  West_Point 
november 2012 by jerryking
Book Review: General Albert C. Wedemeyer - WSJ.com
September 9, 2012 | WSJ | By JONATHAN W. JORDAN.
The Man With a Plan
A warrior who helped lead the Allies to victory armed with charts, graphs and a meticulous attention to detail.

Albert Coady Wedemeyer (1897-1989) was from an upper-middle-class family in Omaha, Neb. Fascinated by European history and the grand strategy of empires as a youth, he was inexorably drawn to the life of a soldier and graduated from West Point in 1919. He foresaw another war with Germany and, in the late 1930s, attended the German army's prestigious general-staff school, the Kriegsakademie. There he learned the art of blitzkrieg alongside his future enemies. He watched Nazi brownshirts strut around Berlin, venting their hatred against Jews. He was in Vienna during the Anschluss, and he saw the Czechoslovakian crisis unfold from the German perspective.

Wedemeyer's report summarizing German tactics and organization brought him to the attention of George C. Marshall, who in 1939 became the Army's chief of staff. Marshall assigned Wedemeyer to the War Plans Division and tasked him with reducing America's mobilization requirements to a single document. In the summer of 1941, in response to a request from Roosevelt, Wedemeyer's team expanded this into a blueprint on how to defeat America's likely enemies in a future war.
1919  book_reviews  WWII  U.S._Army  logistics  generalship  warfare  war  blitzkrieg  military_academies  George_Marshall  mobilization  grand_strategy  '30s  blueprints  detail_oriented  West_Point 
september 2012 by jerryking
War Without End - WSJ.com
October 10, 2001| WSJ | this is an e-mail exchange that occurred Sept. 19 between a senior cadet at West Point and one of his professors, retired Gen. Barry McCaffrey.

Cadet: Could you describe what you think the United States should consider as an "endstate" on the matter of dealing with terrorists? Eradication, containment, or some other option? And what would the United States consider the literal and figurative center of gravity?

Gen. McCaffrey: Great issue to consider . . . we have too liberally borrowed from the language of science to deal with the imperfections of political and security analysis.

There will be no endstate . . . we will, if successful, manage this chronic threat to our survival, economy, and self-confidence by dramatically lowering the risk. We will build a series of defensive programs that will make a multiple order of magnitude increase in our day-to-day security. Second, we will form a coalition based on common danger. Much of the globe will join us to leverage foreign intelligence services and security forces to fight these FTO's forward in the battle area. Finally, we will at last take the gloves off and use integrated military power to find, fix, and destroy these organizations.
Barry_McCaffrey  military_academies  9/11  security_&_intelligence  terrorism  endgame  orders-of-magnitude  imperfections  West_Point 
july 2012 by jerryking
A Letter from the Postmaster - NYTimes.com
March 13, 2011, 6:00 pm
A Letter from the Postmaster
By JAMIE MALANOWSKI

Perhaps the cabinet member most distressed by the news of Sumter’s
vulnerability was the postmaster general, Montgomery Blair. An ardent
Union man and a West Point graduate, Blair was one of the attorneys who
represented Dred Scott. ...The action of the President in 1833 inspired
respect whilst in 1860 the rebels were encouraged by the contempt they
felt for the incumbent of the Presidency. But it was not alone upon Mr.
Buchanan’s weakness the rebels relied for success. They for the most
part believe that the Northern men are deficient in the courage
necessary to maintain the Government. … No men or people have so many
difficulties as those whose firmness is doubted.”
Civil_War  Abraham_Lincoln  history  cabinets  West_Point 
march 2011 by jerryking
Teaching for America - NYTimes.com
November 20, 2010 | new York TImes | By THOMAS L.
FRIEDMAN....Tony Wagner, the Harvard-based education expert and author
of “The Global Achievement Gap,” explains it this way. There are three
basic skills that students need if they want to thrive in a knowledge
economy: the ability to do critical thinking and problem-solving; the
ability to communicate effectively; and the ability to
collaborate......Wagner thinks we should create a West Point for
teachers:..if we want better teachers we also need better parents —
parents who turn off the TV and video games, make sure homework is
completed, encourage reading and elevate learning as the most important
life skill. The more we demand from teachers the more we have to demand
from students and parents. .
Teach_for_America  achievement_gaps  teachers  education  critical_thinking  collaboration  Communicating_&_Connecting  Tom_Friedman  students  ksfs  books  West_Point 
november 2010 by jerryking
William McGurn: A Salute to West Point - WSJ.com
JANUARY 4, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By WILLIAM MCGURN.
Whether character can be taught is an age-old question; usually we refer
to its being built. West Point does not pretend its cadets are immune
from the normal temptations of our culture. After all, they come from
the same towns and high schools other universities draw from. The
difference is that at West Point, words such as duty, honor and country
are spoken without irony—and a scandal is a scandal because behavior is
still measured against standards.
character_traits  education  inspiration  militaries  military_academies  personal_values  traditions  West_Point 
january 2010 by jerryking
That '70s Show: Detroit - WSJ.com
July 8, 2008 | Wall Street Journal | By PAUL INGRASSIA.
Detroit executives might drop by their favorite bookstore before their
summer vacation and pick up a book published last year by Col. Thomas A.
Koldtiz, head of the department of behavioral sciences at West Point.
It's titled "In Extremis Leadership: Leading as if Your Life Depended on
It." There are bound to be some applicable lessons.
automotive_industry  leadership  book_reviews  military_academies  books  life_and_death  West_Point 
june 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read