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jerryking : wi-fi   24

A new industry has sprung up selling “indoor-location” services to retailers
Dec 24th 2016 | Economist

Tracking technologies are ingenious. Some flash out a code to smartphone cameras by means of LED lighting; others, such as IndoorAtlas, a startup with headquarters in California and Finland, monitor how devices disrupt a store’s geomagnetic field. With smartphone ownership rising, the market for tracking phones indoors could grow fivefold between now and 2021, to a total of $23bn, says Research and Markets, a market-research firm.

What do retailers hope to gain? The answer depends on how far they push the technology. On the most basic level, a store might notice that people often walk from “frozen goods” to “alcohol”, and then bring the two closer together. A retailer could also gain more insight into which departments are best at promoting goods—all without knowing anything about shoppers beyond where their legs take them.

If stores can persuade clients to reveal personal information, too, they stand to profit more......Apple and Google are beginning to offer indoor-location services to retailers that use the motion sensors already in handsets. These can see where their owners are, and where they are moving to, using a map of existing Wi-Fi or radio-frequency signals. Shops would not need to set up systems to follow their customers’ phones.
location_based_services  mapping  new_industries  tracking  shopping_malls  retailers  Walkbase  LBMA  IndoorAtlas  foot_traffic  Wi-Fi  Aisle411  Apple  Google  indoors 
september 2017 by jerryking
As Retailers Race to Close Stores, a Web Startup Is Opening Them - WSJ
By Khadeeja Safdar
April 30, 2017

Online brands are treading more carefully into physical retail. Several brands, such as Everlane, Casper and Warby Parker, have opened temporary stores to test out foot traffic and experiment with new concepts. ....One challenge for online brands is to ensure that new locations increase sales, rather than cannibalize existing business.

“We have to see the interplay between our online and offline channels,” said Ms. Ulman. “A customer who shops online and offline is supposed to be very valuable, but we want to understand just how much more valuable.”....Online apparel brands are finding that they don’t need much to set up a store. The evolution of point-of-sales technology means that transactions can now be made on phones and tablets. Some newer retailers don’t even keep much inventory. Bonobos, which started out selling men’s clothing online, lets customers try on items at its more than two dozen “guideshops” and mails purchases to their doorsteps.

Greats sells eight core styles of shoes in different colors and materials, making its business more mobile than that of a traditional retailer. At its new locations, the company plans to bring its own interior elements such as shelving, greenery and lighting.

“You can do a lot within four walls,” said Ms. Ulman. “All we really need is some Wi-Fi.”
clicks-to-bricks  sneakers  pop-ups  e-commerce  retailers  store_closings  shopping_malls  landlords  bricks-and-mortar  foot_traffic  omnichannel  short-term  leasing  inventory-free  cannibalization  Bonobos  Everlane  Casper  Warby_Parker  point-of-sale  brands  Wi-Fi  mens'_clothing  apparel  physical_retail 
june 2017 by jerryking
Toronto's smart thermostat startup Ecobee gets $35-million funding boost - The Globe and Mail
ALICJA SIEKIERSKA
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Aug. 22, 2016

A key part of Ecobee's growth strategy includes partnering Ecobee with high-tech home automation systems, including Apple’s HomeKit and Amazon Echo, which uses the company’s Alexa voice-activated artificial intelligence program. These smart home technologies allow users to control such things as lighting, appliances, security, heating and cooling using the Internet.

Ecobee was the first WiFi thermostat system to be compatible with Amazon Echo.
Ecobee  start_ups  thermostats  sensors  Amazon_Echo  Alexa  smart_homes  home_automation  voice_interfaces  artificial_intelligence  funding  Wi-Fi  Toronto 
august 2016 by jerryking
What Silicon Valley Can Learn From Seoul - NYTimes.com
By JENNA WORTHAM JUNE 2, 2015

One thing Silicon Valley hopes to learn is how to get Americans to actually pay for things on their phones. For years now, Koreans have carried out important daily transactions, like paying bills and shopping, on their smartphones. ....Silicon Valley might also learn how to cater to more customers in more countries around the world. Most Korean companies have been internationally minded since their inception, aware of their own limitations: South Korea is such a small market that entrepreneurs are forced to consider how they might adapt to business abroad.

But without a more affordable, better mobile web, even the best new offerings from American entrepreneurs will be stuck in the past. Perhaps one of the biggest lessons Silicon Valley’s innovators should learn from South Korea is that to radically change how everyday people live their lives, they’ll need to convince their nation to invest in infrastructure, so that we can actually use the services they want to sell us.
Jenna_Wortham  Seoul  South_Korea  mobile_applications  internationally_minded  Silicon_Valley  Wi-Fi  infrastructure 
june 2015 by jerryking
Toronto transit adding WiFi to more subway stations - The Globe and Mail
CHRISTINE DOBBY - TELECOM REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Aug. 12 2014,
Wi-Fi  TTC  transit 
august 2014 by jerryking
The poker-faced Bradley Shaw pegs his future on WiFi - The Globe and Mail
RITA TRICHUR - TELECOM REPORTER

CALGARY — The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Apr. 11 2014
Shaw  Wi-Fi  CEOs  family-owned_businesses  family_business  profile 
april 2014 by jerryking
Smile, you're on WiFi
January 31, 2014
That cellphone in your pocket is emitting a constant stream of information - and retailers are starting to listen in

Ivor Tossell

Mexia, a Winnipeg-based "location analytics" company that's one of a new crop of firms that are supplying retailers with technology that listens in to smartphone signals. Mexia installs Bluetooth and WiFi receivers in specific zones around a store. By measuring the occurrence and relative strength of your phone's passive, unwittingly sent signals, it can tell whether customers are lingering longer in the housewares department, the kitchen aisle or near the checkout. The company says it has deployed sensors in between 80 and 100 stores so far; it also does malls and airports. "We report on a multitude of things, from the traditional traffic count to the time spent in the store," says Glenn Tinley, Mexia's founder and president. "It gets pretty interesting, to say the least."
wi-fi  Bluetooth  mobile_phones  location  location_based_services  tracking  Mexia  Turnstyle  customer_loyalty  shopping_experience  privacy  analytics  confidentiality 
february 2014 by jerryking
Dundee’s real-time data innovations are as good as gold -
Dec. 01 2013 | The Globe and Mail | ERIC REGULY

Installing a data network in the mine puts Dundee at the forefront of the industry’s next phase – treating mines as if they were just-in-time manufacturing sites. That means every activity, from the number of scoops of ore delivered to the crushing machine to the number of metres drilled into the rock face, is recorded and displayed in real time.

In most mines, this data is now written on paper and collected at the end of the work shift, and the numbers are often inaccurate. “We want to turn an extremely low-tech industry into a high-tech industry,” Mr. Howes says. “If this industry wants to advance, it’s going to take a lot of software development.”

Any mishap or slowdown, from a truck that has made an unscheduled stop to a miner who is behind schedule, is immediately transmitted to the surface and action is taken. The surface crew even knows the whereabouts of its workers because an RFID – radio frequency identification device – is embedded in the battery that powers the helmet-mounted lamps.
real-time  Eric_Reguly  mining  massive_data_sets  Wi-Fi  RFID  data  Dundee 
december 2013 by jerryking
New Wi-Fi Pitch: Tracker - WSJ.com
June 18, 2012 | WSJ | By ANTON TROIANOVSKI
(Send to Asif)
Network Developers Offer Retailers Ways to Keep Tabs on Customers as They Shop.

Venues like stores, malls and airports are installing Wi-Fi networks to please smartphone-toting shoppers, who use them to get faster Internet access and avoid cellular-data charges.

But Wi-Fi technology also lets the network operator keep tabs on what users are doing—from where they're standing to what websites they're viewing. That lets retailers learn in what aisle shoppers are most likely to point their iPhone's Web browser to Amazon.com. Mall owners have a new way to judge which storefronts attract the most foot traffic. And owners of Wi-Fi networks can turn their antennas into virtual billboards, charging a premium for ads sent to users' phones in prime locations.
retailers  tracking  Wi-Fi  Boingo  shopping_malls  foot_traffic  Turnstyle  location_based_services 
june 2012 by jerryking
Jenkins: Wi-Fi and the Mobile Meltdown - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 18, 2011, 7:00 P.M. ET

Wi-Fi and the Mobile Meltdown
Hotspots may be the workaround for the spectrum 'shortage.'

...the biggest deliverer of data to smart phones and related devices isn't any of the wireless carriers. It's Wi-Fi, which accounts for 33% compared to 8% for AT&T and 18% for Verizon.

Hmm.

Look at your AT&T iPhone in Manhattan. You're getting four bars and yet broadband is agonizingly slow because too many users are trying to jam bits through at the same time. Look again. Five, 10, 20 or more Wi-Fi networks are also in range of your device. Altogether, within the radius of a single cell tower might be dozens or hundreds of Wi-Fi transceivers.

Hmm.

Virtually every mobile device today comes with Wi-Fi capability. The first iPad was Wi-Fi only. Amazon's new Kindle Fire tablet will, at least in the first installment, be a Wi-Fi-only device.

Hmm.
By HOLMAN W. JENKINS, JR.
Wi-Fi  mobile  wireless_spectrum  scarcity  Holman_Jenkins  hotspots 
october 2011 by jerryking
GETTING ON THE WIFI GAME
09-11-2007 The Globe and Mail (TQ Magazine) by Ian Harvey
Over the next few years, investment in WiFi meshes could pay off for
cities as a revenue source, whether through more efficient delivery of
public services or through provision of services, such as fleet tracking
and communications, to paying customers.
Wi-Fi  municipalities  buildouts  tracking 
march 2009 by jerryking
The wired world goes airborne
Wednesday, August 06 by BRENT JANG AND MATT HARTLEY
Wi-Fi  airline_industry 
march 2009 by jerryking

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