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jerryking : academia   24

Success in academia is as much about grit as talent - Daily chart
May 10th 2019 | Economist |

St. Matthew (Chapter 13, verse 12)
For whosoever hath, to him shall be be given, and he shall have more abundance: but whosoever hath not, from him shall be taken away even that he hath."

IN 1968 ROBERT MERTON, a sociologist at Columbia University, identified a feature of academic life that he called the Matthew effect. The most talented scientists, he observed, tend to have access to the most resources and the best opportunities, and receive a disproportionate amount of credit for their work, thus amplifying their already enhanced reputations and careers. Less brilliant ones, meanwhile, are often left scrambling for money and recognition.

....... success in the sciences does not always breed more success, and that scientists who fail early in their careers may benefit from the experience. .......While some of this can be explained by the weakest scientists in the no-grant group giving up, the three researchers showed that other, unobservable, characteristics such as “effort” or “grit” are also at work. Overall, the authors conclude, the findings are consistent with the concept that “what doesn’t kill me makes me stronger”.
academia  grit  Matthew_effect  scriptures  talent  virtuous_cycles  winner-take-all 
august 2019 by jerryking
Henry Kissinger’s infamous remarks
Henry Kissinger’s infamous remark, “Academic politics are so vicious because the stakes are so small.”
academia  campus_politics  Colleges_&_Universities  Henry_Kissenger  internal_politics  office_politics  quotes  viciousness 
september 2018 by jerryking
Paying Professors: Inside Google’s Academic Influence Campaign - WSJ
By Brody Mullins and Jack Nicas

Paying for favorable academic research has long been a tool of influence by U.S. corporations in food, drug and oil industries. Scandals involving conflicts of interest in medical research have spurred many medical schools, scientific researchers and journals to require disclosure of corporate funding and to prohibit corporate sponsors from meddling with findings......Google’s strategic recruitment of like-minded professors is one of the tech industry’s most sophisticated programs, and includes funding of conferences and research by trade groups, think tanks and consulting firms, according to documents and interviews with academics and lobbyists.
academia  campaign  Colleges_&_Universities  education  influence  lobbying  professors  research 
july 2017 by jerryking
Goodbye, Ivory Tower. Hello, Silicon Valley Candy Store. - The New York Times
By STEVE LOHR SEPT. 3, 2016

A number of tech companies are luring Ivy League economists out of academia with the promise of big sets of data and big salaries.

Silicon Valley is turning to the dismal science in its never-ending quest to squeeze more money out of old markets and build new ones. In turn, the economists say they are eager to explore the digital world for fresh insights into timeless economic questions of pricing, incentives and behavior....Businesses have been hiring economists for years. Usually, they are asked to study macroeconomic trends — topics like recessions and currency exchange rates — and help their employers deal with them.

But what the tech economists are doing is different: Instead of thinking about national or global trends, they are studying the data trails of consumer behavior to help digital companies make smart decisions that strengthen their online marketplaces in areas like advertising, movies, music, travel and lodging.

Tech outfits including giants like Amazon, Facebook, Google and Microsoft and up-and-comers like Airbnb and Uber hope that sort of improved efficiency means more profit....“They are microeconomic experts, heavy on data and computing tools like machine learning and writing algorithms,”
Silicon_Valley  massive_data_sets  economists  Steve_Lohr  Airbnb  Hal_Varian  digital_economy  academia  microeconomics  Ivy_League  insights  consumer_behavior  war_for_talent  talent 
september 2016 by jerryking
The Philadelphia Eagles' Secret Coaches: Professors - WSJ
Sept. 16, 2014 | WSJ | Kevin Clark.

Kelly, in his second NFL season after an impressive run at the University of Oregon, has made academics as much a part of the team as the long snapper. He leans on them all off-season for new ideas and has them on speed dial when he needs a quick fix, according to those who have interacted with the Eagles coach.

"Chip says, 'This guy, with his social sciences or psychology or statistical model or his understanding of African-American history, let's bring him in and see if there's even one idea or one sentence that is a piece of trying to get done what I'm trying to accomplish,' ...Kelly is so devoted to the idea that one of his top lieutenants told professors that Kelly's goal is to have a sort of academic conference, where Kelly is essentially the only beneficiary. (Imagine, if you'd like to laugh, a TED talk with Kelly as the only audience member.)...Ericsson then addressed the entire staff in a 90-minute session in which Kelly tried to get to the heart of the matter. Kelly wanted Ericsson to understand the basic training methods of the Eagles, then ask of the professor, "What could be done differently?"

Ericsson's answer is tied to another Kelly secret. The Eagles use memory devices to get players to memorize formations. Safety Malcolm Jenkins said that during meetings, coaches will show an opponent's formation on a screen, and players will attempt to remember it and yell the play call they would use against it. Then, Jenkins said, snapping his fingers, "They start to flash it quicker and quicker. There's less time to process. And so you build those same cognitive skills where it's the same as getting a mental rep on the field."

Ericsson thought this a noble effort, but in his opinion, it wasn't enough. He recommended that the situations be harder to understand—to go beyond the formations and "get them to respond to video clips of more complex scenarios instead of simple, fast recognitions," he said. "You want to encourage players to be more analytical and open them up to more feedback on what they aren't paying attention to."
academia  innovation  football  sports  NFL  memorization  think_differently  pattern_recognition  PhDs  overlooked  coaching  video_clips  pay_attention  visual_cues 
september 2014 by jerryking
Warren G. Bennis, Scholar on Leadership, Dies at 89 - NYTimes.com
By GLENN RIFKIN
AUGUST 1, 2014

Professor Bennis believed in the adage that great leaders are not born but made, insisting that “the process of becoming a leader is similar, if not identical, to becoming a fully integrated human being,” he said in an interview in 2009. Both, he said, were grounded in self-discovery.

Leadership requires the communication of passion that gives hope and inspiration to other people. Integrity is imperative, and so too, are curiosity and daring.

The experience of his father being summarily fired taught him about the power of organizations and their impact on lives. “That will never happen to me,” he recalled thinking. “I will never lose my power to affect my own life.”...He saw signs that business leaders in the decades to come, inheriting a diverse and complex global environment, would have a better understanding of the territory in which they lead — what he called “contextual intelligence.”
Warren_Bennis  leadership  scholars  gurus  obituaries  WWII  veterans  academia  contextual_intelligence  integrity  curiosity  daring 
august 2014 by jerryking
Is Stanford Too Close to Silicon Valley? :
APRIL 30, 2012 | The New Yorker | BY KEN AULETTA.

"Kathleen Chaykowski, a junior, was a premed and an engineering major who switched to English, and last year was the editor-in-chief of the Stanford Daily. She spoke about the risk-taking that is integral to Silicon Valley. “My academic adviser said, ‘I want you to have a messy career at Stanford. I want to see you try things, to discover the parts of yourself that you didn’t know existed.’ ”"
education  experimentation  Stanford  Silicon_Valley  academia  innovation  intellectual_exploration  technology  messiness  risk-taking  self-discovery 
may 2014 by jerryking
The best sectors for would-be founders
May 22, 2013 | The Financial Times | Luke Johnson

Certain jobs are suited to entrepreneurship, while others are definitely not. If you have ambitions to become an entrepreneur, it pays to join the ...
Luke_Johnson  entrepreneurship  career_paths  farming  real_estate  academia  pharmacies  founders 
may 2013 by jerryking
Maybe corporate guys should mind their business
November 17, 2001 | G&M |Russell Smith

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/maybe-corporate-guys-should-mind-their-business/article1034666/

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1FOmbxn4lK9kAF2nPKH151NSwTik0aFKNGvxX8OSIY6k/edit

Business people should be way more humble and not act as know-it-alls when dealing with artists and academics.....A blind faith in the efficiency of commerce goes hand in hand with a faith in technology.
Russell_Smith  public_speaking  platitudes  critical_thinking  skepticism  contrarians  speeches  artists  academia  sponsorships  humility  hubris  businessman_fallacy 
march 2013 by jerryking
Research Shows Grit Plays Key Role in Black Males’ College Success
February 19, 2013 | Diverse Education | by Marlon A. Walker.

Article looks at the work of Dr. Terrell L. Strayhorn who studies the role that grit plays in predicting successful outcomes of black males at college....In the article, “What Role Does Grit Play in the Academic Success of Black Male Collegians at Predominantly White Institutions?” Strayhorn takes a look at a student’s social background, as well as his academic performance. In it, grit is defined as “the tendency to pursue long-term, challenging goals with perseverance and passion.”...Even when you take Black men in college who have similar GPAs in high school and similar test scores, those who are grittier — who persevere despite setbacks and pursue their own goals despite barriers — are more likely to succeed.”... In reporting their grit level, students were asked to answer things such as: “I finish whatever I begin” and “I have overcome setbacks.”

In the article, Strayhorn says he found that grit, as well as background traits and academic factors explain nearly a quarter of the difference in grades received by Black male students in college. That’s a good thing, he said.

“You can teach people how to be gritty,” he said. “These are not fixed traits in individuals. You can nurture someone’s perseverance, giving way for workshops and programs … teaching students to hang in there, even when they face setbacks and failures.”...The study found that grittier Black males had higher grades than the other Black males in the survey. The study also found that the grittier Black males had better grades and test scores in high school.
Colleges_&_Universities  African-Americans  perseverance  academia  achievement_gaps  education  students  tutoring  SAT  racial_disparities  grit  test-score_data  GPA 
february 2013 by jerryking
The Broadwell Recognition | Daniel W. Drezner
indecorous

the David Petraeus/Paula Broadwell story is the ultimate pundit Rorschach Test. Whatever axe one had to grind against the foreign policy community prior to the story breaking, Petraeus and Broadwell merely sharpens it. It’s evidence about the sexism and double-standards at play in Washington! It shows the insularity and kiss-assedness of the foreign policy community!! It shows that COIN doesn’t work, or that Petraeus was a big phony!!

....a lesson that can be drawn from this for those young, impressionistic aspirants to positions of foreign policy influence......do not, under any circumstances, think of a Ph.D. as merely a box to be checked on the way to power and influence in Washington....... Petraeus both benefited from and propagated the desire to develop "officer-intellectuals" within the military........West Point’s social science department, where Petraeus had taught in the mid-1980s. The department, known as “Sosh,” was founded just after World War II by a visionary ex-cadet and Rhodes Scholar named George A. “Abe” Lincoln. Toward the end of the war, as the senior planning aide to Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Marshall, Lincoln realized that the Army needed to breed a new type of officer to help the nation meet its new global responsibilities in the postwar era. This new officer, he wrote to a colleague, should have “at least three heads—one political, one economic, and one military.” He took a demotion, from brigadier general to colonel, so he could return to West Point and create a curriculum “to improve the so-called Army mind” in just this way: a social science department, encouraging critical thinking, even occasionally dissent.

Lincoln also set up a program allowing cadets with high scores in Sosh classes to go study at a civilian graduate school, with West Point paying the tuition. In exchange, the cadets, after earning their doctorates, would come back and teach for at least three years. Once they fulfilled that obligation, Lincoln would use his still-considerable connections in Washington to get them choice assignments in the Pentagon, the State Department, the White House, a foreign embassy, or a prestigious command post......some scholar-officers rate as being among the best that the military has to offer, and offer a necessary bridge between the scholarly and martial worlds. On the other hand, some of them are there precisely because they see the Ph.D. as a ticket to be punched on the way to something greater. And these are the ones who will usually flail about miserably.......Here's the thing about sub-par doctoral students: 95% of them will not earn a Ph.D. — and most of the rest who do get it will only have done so by finding the most pliant dissertation committee alive. Ambition and intelligence can get someone through college and a professional degree. It can even get someone through Ph.D.-level coursework. What it can’t do is produce an above-the-bar dissertation......For people who have succeeded at pretty much everything in life to that point, a Ph.D. seems like just another barrier to transcend. It’s not. Unless you are able to simultaneously love and critically dissect your subject matter, unless you thrive in an environment where people are looking forward to picking apart your most cherished ideas, you won’t finish......As someone who has advised readers on the relative merits of getting a Ph.D., it’s worth pointing out — repeatedly — that getting a Ph.D. is not for everyone. If there isn’t an idea or a question that truly animates you, if you think of a Ph.D. as merely a ticket to be punched, then know the following: you are looking at a half-decade of misery with nothing to show for it in the end except a terminal masters degree.
academia  Colleges_&_Universities  David_Petraeus  fast_track  high-achieving  invitation-only  KSG  leadership  leadership_development  lessons_learned  overambitious  Paula_Broadwell  PhDs  scandals  scholars  scholar-officers  West_Point 
november 2012 by jerryking
M.I.T. Lab Hatches Ideas, and Companies, by the Dozens - NYTimes.com
November 24, 2012 | NYT | By HANNAH SELIGSON.

Dr. Robert Langer, 64, knows how. Since the 1980s, his Langer Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has spun out companies whose products treat cancer, diabetes, heart disease and schizophrenia, among other diseases, and even thicken hair.

The Langer Lab is on the front lines of turning discoveries made in the lab into a range of drugs and drug delivery systems. Without this kind of technology transfer, the thinking goes, scientific discoveries might well sit on the shelf, stifling innovation.

A chemical engineer by training, Dr. Langer has helped start 25 companies and has 811 patents, issued or pending, to his name.
MIT  Colleges_&_Universities  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  start_ups  technology_transfers  scaling  mentoring  biotech  pharmaceutical_industry  innovation  academia  commercialization  accelerators  incubators 
november 2012 by jerryking
Role Models
May 26, 1990 | The Economist pg. 46 |

The school claims to be recruiting hard: the trouble is that there are few black lawyers who want to do teaching jobs. It is only fairly recently that large numbers of blacks have attended the better law schools, and the brightest of them tend to become practising lawyers. A degree from a law school opens many doors, and a career in teaching is less likely to appeal to black graduates, relatively few of whom come from wealthy families.

The law school's contention that it is looking but not finding is not accepted by Mr Bell and his allies. It is looking for the wrong son of people, they answer: the school should look beyond “Gucci" candidates from an elite law school.

But Harvard is not alone in finding it to recruit black teachers. An American Council on Education survey, released last summer, indicated that eight out often colleges were making some sort of effort to hire more teachers from minority groups. Their effort is unlikely to lead to much in the way of results. The problem is simple: the demand is great but the supply of qualified blacks and Hispanics is limited.

Asians are another story. Although there are six times as many blacks as Asians in the United States, Asians got mine as as blacks in 1988. Relatively few black Americans go to college and only about a third of the students who do go are working in fields that are likely to lead to a graduate school of arts or sciences.

The push for a diverse faculty rests on the notion that black students, at all levels, need role models: teachers who are also black. This may be a tenable argument for schoolchildren: black children need to know that blacks can excel (and girls, of all colours, need to see that women can become doctors and astronauts). But the argument cannot be sustained at university level, where it may well lead to tokenism and lowering of standards. And role models, after all, come in all colours.
academia  African-Americans  children  Colleges_&_Universities  Derrick_Bell  diversity  Harvard  HLS  law_schools  professors  role_models  talent_pipelines  tokenism  women 
august 2012 by jerryking
What Should African-American Studies Students Learn?
October 1, 2009 | The New Republic | by John McWhorter.

This piece is simply a call for a true African-American Studies paradigm: a study of black people entire, with ample room for views from all sides. Black conservatives should be read alongside Du Bois and Baldwin, with no clucking and hedging. Any hovering consensus that leftist positions are “truth” should be a mark of failure.

Here is what I would hope to see in the wake of what I write.

Since I started writing and speaking on race in 2000, it has been typical that when I am invited to speak at a university by an African-American Studies department, often I am expected to yield some time to someone assigned to give a riposte--i.e. speak up for the usual leftist line. That is, the inviters pride themselves on being open-minded enough to hear me out, but consider it the duty of good-thinking folk to provide, shall we say, “balance.”

But then, when “proper”-thinking black writers are invited to speak, there is no sense that their talk is incomplete without a “conservative” person spending fifteen minutes having their say.

African-American Studies departments typically see themselves as doing their jobs in harboring a “controversial” speaker, partly out of a wan gesture towards true intellectual engagement, but equally as much because they know that person will, because of shock value, fill seats.

However, they are not engaged in true exploration, in the intellectual sense, until they can process the “controversial” speaker as simply, and only, a speaker, with one view among many. And, if articulate enough to merit invitation, worthy of engagement without some “right-minded” black faculty member dragged in as a “corrective.”

In an African-American Studies department of the kind I suggest, speakers and teachers of all walks would be permitted--note: not just conservative ones--and students would be able to come to their own conclusions. That is, be educated in the true sense.
academia  African-Americans  black_studies  Colleges_&_Universities  curriculum  heterogeneity  intellectual_exploration  intellectual_diversity  John_McWhorter  students  syllabus  victimhood 
october 2009 by jerryking
In the Basement of the Ivory Tower - The Atlantic (June 2008)
June 2008 Atlantic
The idea that a university education is for everyone is a destructive
myth. An instructor at a “college of last resort” explains why.

by Professor X
English  education  academia  writing  literacy  learning  Colleges_&_Universities 
october 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: A pioneer in the field of televised conflict
May 1, 2009 | The Globe & Mail | obituary for JOHN CRISPO,
76: ECONOMIST by PETER CHENEY.

A pioneer in the field of televised conflict. Pithy insights and
memorable quotes made him a media darling -- until Mulroney put him on
the board of the CBC
economists  conservatism  Canadian  academia  obituaries 
may 2009 by jerryking

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