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jerryking : achievement_gaps   66

We need to talk about the boys -
MAY 5, 2018 | The Globe and Mail | MARGARET WENTE.

It’s girls who get all the attention these days. But it’s the boys we should be worried about. Boys lag girls in school at every level. They drop out, get in trouble with the law, and become disconnected from the mainstream – sometimes for good.

Jamil Jivani was heading there himself. He grew up in Brampton, Ont....At age 16, he couldn’t read – or didn’t care enough to. He was convinced the system was rigged against him. His role models were gansta rappers. Police officers gave him a hard time. His dad wasn’t in the picture.....Mr. Jivani is now 30. He is a law professor, a graduate of Yale, and an activist for disadvantaged communities. His personal story is the powerful thread running through his new book, Why Young Men: Rage, Race and the Crisis of Identity......He aims to change the conversation from “either/or” to “and also.” “If you’re trying to change the conditions young men grow up in,” he says, “you need to talk about both law enforcement and families.”

He gets pushback saying things like that. “People are used to hearing a certain kind of narrative – the world is unfair, racist, biased, and the primary concern we should have is that these are systems that oppress us – systemic racism, sexism, and so on. It’s amazing how much this passes as a truth.”

Mr. Jivani believes that we can’t address the crisis of young men without talking about families and culture. For boys, fathers are their first line of defence. Without fathers, they may have no positive role models for how to be a man.

“A lot of people in the black community want to talk about fatherlessness,” he says. But we seldom hear from them. The voices you hear are all from one side, and the media seldom seek out any other perspectives.

People censor themselves too. “..... Black Lives Matter makes things worse. “It’s a style of activism that tries to define people – to tell them this is what you’re supposed to think and do because of your identity.” ....“BLM’s approach to activism focuses on having an enemy that must be defeated,” he writes. “It is accusatory at its core.”
Margaret_Wente  fatherhood  parenting  dysfunction  Black_Lives_Matter  African_Canadians  books  crisis  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  lawyers  Osgoode  family_breakdown  values  dropouts  achievement_gaps  Yale  activism  economically_disadvantaged  victimhood 
may 2018 by jerryking
Lost Einsteins: The Innovations We’re Missing -
DEC. 3, 2017 | The New York Times | David Leonhardt.

societies have a big interest in making sure that as many people as possible have the opportunity to become scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs. It’s not only a matter of fairness. Denying opportunities to talented people can end up hurting everyone.

.....Raj Chetty....is a Stanford professor who helps lead the Equality of Opportunity Project.... considered among the most important research efforts in economics today.....The project’s latest paper, out Sunday, looks at who becomes an inventor — and who doesn’t. The results are disturbing....The key phrase in the research paper is “lost Einsteins.” It’s a reference to people who could “have had highly impactful innovations” if they had been able to pursue the opportunities they deserved.....children who excelled in math were far more likely to become inventors. But being a math standout wasn’t enough. Only the top students who also came from high-income families had a decent chance to become an inventor.

This fact may be the starkest: Low-income students who are among the very best math students — those who score in the top 5 percent of all third graders — are no more likely to become inventors than below-average math students from affluent families:

....“There are great differences in innovation rates,” Chetty said. “Those differences don’t seem to be due to innate ability to innovate.” Or as Steve Case — the entrepreneur who’s now investing in regions that venture capital tends to ignore — told me when I called him to discuss the findings: “Creativity is broadly distributed. Opportunity is not.” [or life’s basic truth: Talent is universal, but opportunity is not.]
innovation  equality_of_opportunity  Steve_Case  Albert_Einstein  achievement_gaps  affluence  high-income  low-income  mathematics  capitalization  human_potential  inventions  inventiveness  inventors  creativity  quotes  unevenly_distributed 
december 2017 by jerryking
Whites Have Huge Wealth Edge Over Blacks (but Don’t Know It) - The New York Times
By EMILY BADGER SEPT. 18, 2017

Americans believe that blacks and whites are more equal today than they truly are on measures of income, wealth, wages and health benefits. And they believe more historical progress has occurred than is the case, suggesting “a profound misperception of and unfounded optimism” regarding racial equality......we also overgeneralize from other markers of racial progress: the election of a black president, the passage of civil rights laws, the sea change in public opinion around issues like segregation. If society has progressed in these ways, we assume there’s been great economic progress, too.

We’re inclined, as well, to believe that society is fairer than it really is. The reality that it’s not — that even college-educated black workers earn about 20 percent less than college-educated white ones, for example — is uncomfortable for both blacks who’ve been harmed by that unfairness and whites who’ve benefited from it......If we want people to have a better understanding of racial inequality, this implies that the solution isn’t simply to parrot these statistics more widely. It’s to get Americans thinking more about the forces that underlie them, like continued discrimination in hiring, or disparities in mortgage lending.

It’s a myth that racial progress is inevitable, Ms. Richeson said. “But it’s also dangerous insofar as it keeps us blind to considerable inequality in our nation that’s quite foundational,” she said. “Of course we can’t address it if we’re not even willing to acknowledge it.”

And if we’re not willing to acknowledge it, she adds, that has direct consequences for whether Americans are willing to support affirmative action policies, or continued enforcement of the Voting Rights Act, or renewed efforts at school desegregation......
achievement_gaps  generational_wealth  misperceptions  African-Americans  optimism  whites  racial_disparities  infographics  white_privilege 
september 2017 by jerryking
The Asian Advantage - The New York Times
OCT. 10, 2015 | NYT | Nicholas Kristof.

the Asian advantage, Nisbett argues, isn’t intellectual firepower as such, but how it is harnessed.

Some disagree, but I’m pretty sure that one factor is East Asia’s long Confucian emphasis on education. Likewise, a focus on education also helps explain the success of Jews, who are said to have had universal male literacy 1,700 years before any other group.
overachievers  ksfs  Nicholas_Kristof  stereotypes  Asian-Americans  books  education  parenting  ethnic_communities  movingonup  achievement_gaps  ethnic_stereotyping  values  Confucian  literacy 
october 2015 by jerryking
Education Gap Between Rich and Poor Is Growing Wider - The New York Times
SEPT. 22, 2015 | NYT | Eduardo Porter.

For all the progress in improving educational outcomes among African-American children, the achievement gaps between more affluent and less privileged children is wider than ever, notes Sean Reardon of the Center for Education Policy Analysis at Stanford. Racial disparities are still a stain on American society, but they are no longer the main divider. Today the biggest threat to the American dream is class.....Financed mainly by real estate taxes that are more plentiful in neighborhoods with expensive homes, public education is becoming increasingly compartmentalized. Well-funded schools where the children of the affluent can play and learn with each other are cordoned off from the shabbier schools teaching the poor, who are still disproportionally from black or Hispanic backgrounds.
poverty  African-Americans  income_inequality  racial_disparities  real_estate_taxes  education  achievement_gaps  social_classes  public_education  sorting  segregation  geographic_sorting  neighbourhoods  children  affluence  upper-income  super_ZIPs  compartmentalization  the_American_dream 
september 2015 by jerryking
Harvard Accused of Bias Against Asian-Americans
A complaint Friday alleged that Harvard University discriminates against Asian-American applicants by setting a higher bar for admissions than that faced by other groups. The complaint, filed by a…
Harvard  Colleges_&_Universities  admissions  Asian-Americans  biases  elitism  achievement_gaps  ethnic_stereotyping  meritocratic  students  racial_disparities  Ivy_League 
may 2015 by jerryking
When Whites Just Don’t Get It - NYTimes.com
AUGUST 30, 2014 | NYT |Nicholas Kristof.

• The net worth of the average black household in the U.S. is $6,314, compared with $110,500 for the average white household, according to 2011 census data. The gap has worsened in the last decade, and the U.S now has a greater wealth gap by race than South Africa did during apartheid. (Whites in America on average own almost 18 times as much as blacks; in South Africa in 1970, the ratio was about 15 times.)

• The black-white income gap is roughly 40 percent greater today than it was in 1967.

• A black boy born today in the U.S. has a life expectancy five years shorter than that of a white boy.

• Black students are significantly less likely to attend schools offering advanced math and science courses than white students. They are three times as likely to be suspended and expelled, setting them up for educational failure.

• Because of the catastrophic experiment in mass incarceration, black men in their 20s without a high school diploma are more likely to be incarcerated today than employed, according to a study from the National Bureau of Economic Research. Nearly 70 percent of middle-aged black men who never graduated from high school have been imprisoned.

All these constitute not a black problem or a white problem, but an American problem.
race_relations  racial_disparities  achievement_gaps  Nicholas_Kristof  mass_incarceration 
august 2014 by jerryking
Achievement gaps: Revenge of the tiger mother
May 5th 2014 | | The Economist |

Yet despite this pushback, the Asian-American achievement advantage is well documented, and Amy Hsin and Yu Xie, sociologists at City University of New York and the University of Michigan, wanted to try to find out why it exists. In a new paper in the journal PNAS, they looked at whether it could be explained by socio-demographic factors (such as family income and parental education), cognitive ability (were these children simply more intelligent?), or work ethic.

Although Asian Americans do often come from better educated and higher income families, socio-demographic factors could not explain the achievement gap between Asians and whites. This is because recently arrived Asian immigrants with little formal education and low incomes have children that do better in school than their white peers. Asian-Americans actually fall into four distinct categories in America. East and South-Asian children tend to be socio-economically privileged, whereas South-East Asian and Filipino children tend to be disadvantaged.

Being brainier isn't the answer either. When the pair looked at cognitive ability as measured by standardised tests, Asian-Americans were not different from their white peers. Instead Dr Hsin and Dr Xie find that the achievement gap can be explained through harder work—as measured by teacher assessments of student work habits and motivation. (Although the authors warn that this form of assessment will capture both true behavioural differences as well as a teacher’s perception of differences.)

What might explain harder work? The authors point to the fact Asian-Americans are likely to be immigrants or children of immigrants who, as a group, tend to be more optimistic. These are people who have made a big move in search of better opportunities. Immigration is a "manifestation of that optimism through effort, that you can have a better life". Added to this mix is a general cultural belief among Asian-Americans that achievement comes with effort. We know that children who believe ability is innate are more inclined to give up if something doesn't come naturally. An understanding that success requires hard work—not merely an aptitude—is therefore useful. This finding is worth bearing in mind when considering the current fuss over new tests in mathematics, as some parents complain that they are now too hard.
achievement_gaps  students  Amy_Chua  immigrants  Tiger_Moms  parenting  ethnic_communities  grit  Asian-Americans  hard_work 
may 2014 by jerryking
Tiger Mom Amy Chua's theory of success: Three factors why Indians, Jews, Chinese do better than others - The Globe and Mail
CRAIG OFFMAN

The Globe and Mail

Published Wednesday, Feb. 05 2014

[JCK: Luke Johnson opining in the Financial Times on South Asian immigrants to the UK from Uganda-: What we need is brainpower and willpower - they are the greatest natural resources.]
achievement_gaps  Amy_Chua  Asian-Americans  books  brainpower  ethnic_communities  ksfs  movingonup  parenting  willpower 
february 2014 by jerryking
What Drives Success? - NYTimes.com
JAN. 25, 2014 | NYT | By AMY CHUA and JED RUBENFELD.

the strikingly successful groups in America today share three traits that, together, propel success. The first is a superiority complex — a deep-seated belief in their exceptionality. The second appears to be the opposite — insecurity, a feeling that you or what you’ve done is not good enough. The third is impulse control.

Any individual, from any background, can have what we call this Triple Package of traits. But research shows that some groups are instilling them more frequently than others, and that they are enjoying greater success.

It’s odd to think of people feeling simultaneously superior and insecure. Yet it’s precisely this unstable combination that generates drive: a chip on the shoulder, a goading need to prove oneself. Add impulse control — the ability to resist temptation — and the result is people who systematically sacrifice present gratification in pursuit of future attainment.

Ironically, each element of the Triple Package violates a core tenet of contemporary American thinking....The same factors that cause poverty — discrimination, prejudice, shrinking opportunity — can sap from a group the cultural forces that propel success. Once that happens, poverty becomes more entrenched. In these circumstances, it takes much more grit, more drive and perhaps a more exceptional individual to break out.
brainpower  willpower  poverty  movingonup  Amy_Chua  Mormons  ethnic_communities  immigrants  ksfs  self-discipline  perseverance  achievement_gaps  paranoia  Sonia_Sotomayor  overachievers  sacrifice  delayed_gratification  impulse_control  insecurity  exceptionality  superiority_complex  dual-consciousness  cultural_values  hardships 
january 2014 by jerryking
SAT ABC's - WSJ.com
Aug. 29, 2003 | WSJ | editorial.

If America were really serious about closing this gap, instead of squabbling over entry to, say, the University of Michigan law school, we'd be redressing the inner-city K-12 system that is so conspicuously failing to educate black children. Black moms and dads understand this, which is why overwhelming majorities continue to tell pollsters that they favor vouchers and other forms of school choice. Unfortunately, their political representatives tend to be folks allergic to any reform that involves actually holding the public school systems accountable.
high_schools  Colleges_&_Universities  African-Americans  standardized_testing  vouchers  SAT  editorials  achievement_gaps  K-12  public_schools 
december 2013 by jerryking
Education: Minding the gap
Nov 16th 2013 | | The Economist |

The University of Arizona has a system called eAdvisor. This keeps track of each student’s progress towards his degree, and can make sure that courses which are critical but difficult—such as maths or statistics—are taken early on. Thanks to this system, which came online in 2007, the proportion of students (of all races) who move up to the next year each year has risen from 77% to 84%.

New findings from four Tennessee colleges support the idea that eAdvisors work. Software called the Degree Compass (developed by Tristan Denley, a mathematician) makes course suggestions for students in much the same way that Netflix recommends films to watch and Amazon offers goods to buy. The program ranks courses by their usefulness to a student for the degree he is taking, and also predicts those in which he is likely to get the best grade.
Colleges_&_Universities  African-Americans  achievement_gaps  students  personalization  algorithms  recommendations 
november 2013 by jerryking
Victorian values for the 21st century - The Globe and Mail
Margaret Wente

The Globe and Mail

Published Saturday, Oct. 05 2013

the real keys to success are far more old-fashioned – Victorian, even. They are self-regulation, conscientiousness and diligence. More than ever, perhaps, 21st-century success will require 19th-century values.....The trouble is that cultivating 19th-century habits in the 21st century isn’t easy. In Victorian times, self-regulation was reinforced by many kinds of external pressure, including social norms, religion, family and Queen. The consequences of lapsing from the straight and narrow – social disgrace, even ruin – could be severe. Today, you’re far more reliant on yourself to stay the course, and nobody else much cares if you don’t.....Daniel Akst argues in Temptation: Finding Self-Control in an Age of Excess, modern life requires an unnatural degree of self-control. ... in an age of super-affluence, it’s a constant struggle to keep our appetites in check. “It’s not that we have less willpower than we used to,” he writes, “but rather that modern life immerses us daily in a set of temptations far more evolved than we are.”

Self-discipline and high IQ often go together. But they are not the same. As Mr. Akst reports, self-discipline is a far better predictor of university grades than either IQ or SAT scores. ...many of America’s children have trouble making choices that require them to sacrifice short-term pleasure for long-term gain.”
21st._century  achievement_gaps  gender_gap  IQ  values  books  self-control  self-discipline  Tyler_Cowen  Victorian  willpower  temptations  delayed_gratification  self-regulation  proclivities 
october 2013 by jerryking
Eli Broad's Entrepreneurial Approach to Philanthropy
September 13, 2013 | WSJ | By ALEXANDRA WOLFE.

Eli Broad's Entrepreneurial Approach to Philanthropy
Billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad on art, education and revitalizing Los Angeles....Mr. Broad describes his approach to philanthropy as entrepreneurial. Mostly, he says, "what I do is I bet on people." Mr. Broad himself spends most of his time identifying effective leaders—and then he invests in them and their ideas. He also spends millions of dollars each year coming up with metrics to reveal hard data about performance, and only continues funding a school or institution if it is showing signs of improvement....
...Eli Broad enjoys artists' thoughts on "the human condition." He talks to them about social and global issues, from the disappearance of the middle class to the crisis in Syria. The gap between the rich and poor bothers Mr. Broad, he says, and has been an impetus for his philanthropy. "Artists see the world differently than us businesspeople," he says. "If I spent all my time with bankers, lawyers and businesspeople, it would be kind of boring."
moguls  entrepreneur  Eli_Broad  Los_Angeles  philanthropy  benefactors  school_districts  achievement_gaps  metrics  museums  collectors  art  artists  artwork  art_galleries  patronage  the_human_condition 
september 2013 by jerryking
Research Shows Grit Plays Key Role in Black Males’ College Success
February 19, 2013 | Diverse Education | by Marlon A. Walker.

Article looks at the work of Dr. Terrell L. Strayhorn who studies the role that grit plays in predicting successful outcomes of black males at college....In the article, “What Role Does Grit Play in the Academic Success of Black Male Collegians at Predominantly White Institutions?” Strayhorn takes a look at a student’s social background, as well as his academic performance. In it, grit is defined as “the tendency to pursue long-term, challenging goals with perseverance and passion.”...Even when you take Black men in college who have similar GPAs in high school and similar test scores, those who are grittier — who persevere despite setbacks and pursue their own goals despite barriers — are more likely to succeed.”... In reporting their grit level, students were asked to answer things such as: “I finish whatever I begin” and “I have overcome setbacks.”

In the article, Strayhorn says he found that grit, as well as background traits and academic factors explain nearly a quarter of the difference in grades received by Black male students in college. That’s a good thing, he said.

“You can teach people how to be gritty,” he said. “These are not fixed traits in individuals. You can nurture someone’s perseverance, giving way for workshops and programs … teaching students to hang in there, even when they face setbacks and failures.”...The study found that grittier Black males had higher grades than the other Black males in the survey. The study also found that the grittier Black males had better grades and test scores in high school.
Colleges_&_Universities  African-Americans  perseverance  academia  achievement_gaps  education  students  tutoring  SAT  racial_disparities  grit  test-score_data  GPA 
february 2013 by jerryking
Asians - Too Smart for Their Own Good? - NYTimes.com
By CAROLYN CHEN
Published: December 19, 2012

Asian-Americans constitute 5.6 percent of the nation’s population but 12 to 18 percent of the student body at Ivy League schools. But if judged on their merits — grades, test scores, academic honors and extracurricular activities — Asian-Americans are underrepresented at these schools. Consider that Asians make up anywhere from 40 to 70 percent of the student population at top public high schools like Stuyvesant and Bronx Science in New York City, Lowell in San Francisco and Thomas Jefferson in Alexandria, Va., where admissions are largely based on exams and grades.

In a 2009 study of more than 9,000 students who applied to selective universities, the sociologists Thomas J. Espenshade and Alexandria Walton Radford found that white students were three times more likely to be admitted than Asians with the same academic record.
admissions  education  Colleges_&_Universities  achievement_gaps  ethnic_stereotyping  meritocratic  students  racial_disparities  Asian-Americans  underrepresentation  Stuyvesant_High 
december 2012 by jerryking
Book Review: Mismatch - WSJ.com
October 23, 2012|WSJ |By TREVOR BUTTERWORTH.

The Hidden Campus Crisis
Placing unprepared students in challenging academic environments derails their lives and careers.
affirmative_action  book_reviews  achievement_gaps  African-Americans  unprepared  mismatches 
october 2012 by jerryking
Memo to Toronto school board: Are you nuts?
February 2, 2008 | G& M pg. A23 | Jeffrey Simpson.

Given the provincial election results, it is hard to fathom how the Toronto District School Board could be sanctioning "Afrocentric schools" that, although theoretically open to all, are clearly designed for black students only, or almost only. How could it be that having rejected an extension of religiously based schools just a few months ago, the province's largest city will now countenance the creation of racially based ones?

Of course, the board was pressured, as boards often are, by interest groups with a cause - in this case, the theory that inadequate educational achievement can be improved by changing the curriculum. That poor achievement - a 40 per cent dropout rate by black students - is supposed to be lowered if the curriculum is more Afrocentric, which will be quite a trick in mathematics, physics, biology, foreign languages, basic civics, and even the broad sweep of world and Canadian history.
The theory is largely unsound. The much more frequent explanations for poor student achievement, for blacks or any other group, have much less to do with curriculum than factors over which schools have little control: dysfunctional families, troubled neighbourhoods, few role models (absent fathers), poverty, gangs or, in a few immigrant communities, attitudes toward education (especially for females) that are not easily reconciled with mainstream Canadian ones.

All the discourse about inclusiveness, that usually forms a staple of trendy, leftish discourse, has been discarded by the Toronto board in favour of its opposite: membership based overwhelmingly on one characteristic of the human and educational experience - race. As such, it is at profound variance with an important goal of a "public" school system, and should therefore be rejected.
Jeffrey_Simpson  African_Canadians  TDSB  identity_politics  Afrocentric  education  schools  dropouts  public_schools  race  achievement_gaps  family_breakdown  dysfunction  fatherhood  out-of-wedlock 
august 2012 by jerryking
A university degree’s value is incontestable - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 20 2012 | The Globe and Mail | Jeffrey Simpson.

"Whether you measure by the rate of employment or income earned, going to university and graduating improves income and everything that accompanies higher income. Students and their parents understand this truism, which is why entrance demand for universities (and colleges) remains strong."..." the gap between income and prospects for humanities versus science grads is way lower than between all university grads and those without a university degree.

It’s worth bearing this incontestable fact in mind after watching the most startlingly incomprehensible event in Canada this year – at least to those who try to see the world rationally: six months of demonstrations in Quebec. There, students already paying the lowest fees by far in North America took to the streets in large numbers to reject paying modestly more (which would have still left Quebec’s fees the lowest on the continent) and, in some cases, to reject paying any tuition fees at all.

Drunk with their own street power, the leaders of the most militant of the student groups vowed last weekend to keep up their “class struggle” (their words) because they represent “the people” (again, their words), although every public opinion survey suggests that an overwhelming number of Quebeckers disagree with the students’ position on fees. They vowed to make their position heard on behalf of “the people” (read: themselves) throughout the provincial election campaign expected to begin shortly.

Students in Quebec, and elsewhere in Canada, should check with Statistics Canada. In 2009, according to data from the agency’s Labour Force Survey, those with a bachelor’s degree had an unemployment rate of 5.2 per cent, about 2.5 points below the national rate. Those with graduate degrees were doing even better, at 4.6 per cent."
Colleges_&_Universities  Quebec  Jeffrey_Simpson  achievement_gaps 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Opportunity Gap - NYTimes.com
The Opportunity Gap
By DAVID BROOKS
Published: July 9, 2012

Decades ago, college-graduate parents and high-school-graduate parents invested similarly in their children. Recently, more affluent parents have invested much more in their children’s futures while less affluent parents have not.

They’ve invested more time. Over the past decades, college-educated parents have quadrupled the amount of time they spend reading “Goodnight Moon,” talking to their kids about their day and cheering them on from the sidelines. High-school-educated parents have increased child-care time, but only slightly.

A generation ago, working-class parents spent slightly more time with their kids than college-educated parents. Now college-educated parents spend an hour more every day. This attention gap is largest in the first three years of life when it is most important.

Affluent parents also invest more money in their children. Over the last 40 years upper-income parents have increased the amount they spend on their kids’ enrichment activities, like tutoring and extra curriculars, by $5,300 a year. The financially stressed lower classes have only been able to increase their investment by $480, adjusted for inflation.

As a result, behavior gaps are opening up. In 1972, kids from the bottom quartile of earners participated in roughly the same number of activities as kids from the top quartile. Today, it’s a chasm.
David_Brooks  parenting  achievement_gaps  opportunities  social_classes  purchase_decisions  opportunity_gaps  college-educated  working_class  attention_gaps  affluence  behavior_gaps  super_ZIPs  self-perpetuation  values  unfair_advantages  upper-income  high-school_graduated 
july 2012 by jerryking
BBC News - African-Caribbean boys 'would rather hustle than learn'
20 October 2011 | BBC | By Hannah Richardson BBC News education reporter.

African-Caribbean boys 'would rather hustle than learn'
achievement_gaps  African_Canadians  Caribbean  homophobia  United_Kingdom  high_schools  racial_disparities  hustle  men  masculinity  Afro-Caribbeans 
may 2012 by jerryking
Colon Cancer Advances Show Black-White Divide - NYTimes.com
December 27, 2011, 11:48 am
Colon Cancer Advances Show Black-White Divide
By ANAHAD O'CONNOR
colons  colorectal  cancers  achievement_gaps  racial_disparities 
december 2011 by jerryking
WSJ: The Threat in the Air
The Threat in the Air

By AMY L. WAX
April 13, 2004; Page A20
Amy_Wax  testing  achievement_gaps  stereotypes  Stanford 
november 2011 by jerryking
Forty Acres and a Gap in Wealth
by HENRY LOUIS GATES Jr.
Published: November 18, 2007

The telltale fact is that the biggest gap in black prosperity isn’t in income, but in wealth. According to a study by the economist Edward N. Wolff, the median net worth of non-Hispanic black households in 2004 was only $11,800 — less than 10 percent that of non-Hispanic white households, $118,300. Perhaps a bold and innovative approach to the problem of black poverty — one floated during the Civil War but never fully put into practice — would be to look at ways to turn tenants into homeowners. Sadly, in the wake of the subprime mortgage debacle, an enormous number of houses are being repossessed. But for the black poor, real progress may come only once they have an ownership stake in American society.

People who own property feel a sense of ownership in their future and their society. They study, save, work, strive and vote. And people trapped in a culture of tenancy do not.

The sad truth is that the civil rights movement cannot be reborn until we identify the causes of black suffering, some of them self-inflicted. Why can’t black leaders organize rallies around responsible sexuality, birth within marriage, parents reading to their children and students staying in school and doing homework?
Henry_Louis_Gates  African-Americans  owners  land  property_ownership  achievement_gaps  racial_disparities  personal_finance  wealth_creation  real_estate  social_classes  subprime  home_ownership  generational_wealth  ownership 
november 2011 by jerryking
No Excuses: Closing the Racial Gap in Learning | by Abigail and Stephan Thernstrom | review: Wall Street Journal
No Excuses:
Closing the Racial Gap in Learning
Simon & Schuster, (October 2003)
by Abigail and Stephan Thernstrom

The message of Abigail and Stephan Thernstrom's "No Excuses" (Simon & Schuster, 334 pages, $26) is that, despite major progress toward racial equality since the 1950s, there is an academic chasm between black and Hispanic children on the one hand and whites and Asians on the other. "The racial gap in educational achievement is an educational crisis, but it is also the main source of ongoing racial inequality," the authors declare. "And racial inequality is America's great unfinished business, the wound that remains unhealed."

Wall Street Journal, 10/9/03

A Lot More to Learn
By Clint Bolick
achievement_gaps  race  racial_disparities  book_reviews  affirmative_action  Colleges_&_Universities 
november 2011 by jerryking
Falling SAT Scores, Widening Achievement Gap - Brian Resnick - National -
Sep 16 2011 | The Atlantic | By Brian Resnick..."I am married
to an Asian immigrant and live in an Asian neighborhood...getting a 'C'
on a report card is a mark of shame...Asian kids do not go and play
after school - they do their homework, study then their parents quiz
them on what they studied.l.... And Asians will sacrifice in order to
live in areas with good schools "..."My 97% of my graduating high school
class didn't know what an adjective was. It's not money, it's not race,
it's the educational system. We're running an old system that was used
to just drone info into children, as the results show that's no longer
working, we're not in the industrial age anymore. We need to go back and
revise how we teach kids. We can't just focus on math and sciences
anymore, imo we need to evaluate children and place them in the areas
that obviously interest them instead of trying to cram multiple subjects
into their heads. "
achievement_gaps  commentators  students  high_schools  racial_disparities  SAT  standardized_testing  sacrifice 
september 2011 by jerryking
Idea of ‘Africentric lens’ at Oakwood Collegiate called short-sighted - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE | Columnist profile | E-mail
From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Mar. 28, 2011 8:54PM EDT
Last updated Thursday, Mar. 31, 2011
TDSB  Marcus_Gee  Afrocentric  schools  students  achievement_gaps  segregation 
april 2011 by jerryking
Where cherished values collide - The Globe and Mail
MARGARET WENTE | Columnist profile | E-mail
Nov. 23, 2010
The growing Asian presence on North American campuses is a big story –
culturally, demographically, politically. It’s also a story that pits
some of our most cherished values against each other. We believe that
our public universities should broadly reflect society. We also believe
they should be meritocratic. But what if those two values collide?
Canada  education  Colleges_&_Universities  achievement_gaps  Maclean’s  ethnic_stereotyping  meritocratic  Margaret_Wente  students 
april 2011 by jerryking
Teaching for America - NYTimes.com
November 20, 2010 | new York TImes | By THOMAS L.
FRIEDMAN....Tony Wagner, the Harvard-based education expert and author
of “The Global Achievement Gap,” explains it this way. There are three
basic skills that students need if they want to thrive in a knowledge
economy: the ability to do critical thinking and problem-solving; the
ability to communicate effectively; and the ability to
collaborate......Wagner thinks we should create a West Point for
teachers:..if we want better teachers we also need better parents —
parents who turn off the TV and video games, make sure homework is
completed, encourage reading and elevate learning as the most important
life skill. The more we demand from teachers the more we have to demand
from students and parents. .
Teach_for_America  achievement_gaps  teachers  education  critical_thinking  collaboration  Communicating_&_Connecting  Tom_Friedman  students  ksfs  books  West_Point 
november 2010 by jerryking
Toronto's Africentric School: Is it needed? Is it wanted?
27 Feb 2009 | TVOParents Your Voice Episode. Discussion Points
1. What causes the high drop-out rate of African-Canadian kids?
2. What is the argument against the Africentric school? 3. How does
poverty affect student performance? 4. Do Africentric schools work?
Special Feature

Drop-Out Rates Among Racialized Groups

* English-speaking Caribbean – 40 percent
* Central and South American – 37 percent
* East African – 32 percent
* Southeast Asian – 29 percent
* West Asian – 28 percent
* West African – 26 percent
* Canadian Black – 23 percent

Source: 2006 Toronto District School Board Census

Start viewing around 1 minute 45 seconds.
schools  African_Canadians  Afrocentric  video  TVO  achievement_gaps  dropouts  racial_disparities 
april 2010 by jerryking
Earnings gap a 'troubling' trend - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 24, 2009 | Globe and Mail | by JOE FRIESEN AND TAVIA
GRANT. Much of the difficulty in finding a high-paying job that matches
an applicant's qualifications relates to the elusive Canadian experience
that employers seek. It's difficult to get a good job without Canadian
experience, but impossible to get that Canadian experience without first
getting a good job. "Their best chance at jobs are with people they
know, and very often their social networks are not very strong," Mr.
Jedwab said. "If your best connections are at a local restaurant ...
then you'll get a job at a restaurant."
immigrants  Toronto  Canada  productivity  TD_Bank  Statistics_Canada  Tavia_Grant  social_capital  social_networking  achievement_gaps  Joe_Friesen 
november 2009 by jerryking
Guys Left Behind - WSJ.com
JUNE 2, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By MARK PENN with E.
Kinney Zalesne. Women are succeeding in an ever-widening range of areas,
while there is a statistically significant and growing group of guys
who are just not going to make it.
Mark_Penn  gender_gap  microtrends  masculinity  achievement_gaps 
june 2009 by jerryking
Race, culture and equality
June 18, 1998 | Forbes magazine | Dr. Thomas Sowell. This
article was adapted from a speech made by Dr. Sowell at the Commonwealth
Club of California in San Francisco. Comments on how common huge
disparities in income and wealth have been for centuries, in countries
around the world. Some of these disparities have been among racial or
ethnic groups, some among nations, and some among regions, continents or
whole civilizations.
Thomas_Sowell  disparities  achievement_gaps  income_distribution  inequality  racial_disparities  ethnic_communities 
april 2009 by jerryking
Entrepreneur Library of Inspiring Articles and Case Studies:Do Whites and Wealthy Have a Start-Up Edge?
August 20, 2007 WSJ article by Kelly K. Spors on the results of
a study by the Small Business Administration's Office of Advocacy.
Minorities are 55% less likely to start a business than whites.
race  race_relations  entrepreneurship  Kelly_K._Spors  start_ups  achievement_gaps  racial_disparities 
february 2009 by jerryking
BAD IDEAS 101: School by skin colour
Nov. 7, 2007 G&M editorial that argues Afrocentric
education as a way of closing the achievement gap with white children,
is a misguided idea.
Afrocentric  African_Canadians  education  schools  segregation  race_relations  achievement_gaps  editorials 
january 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: How Romanian-Canadians make the grade
April 5, 2008 | Globe & Mail | article by John Lorinc,
special to the Globe& Mail, profiling a Romanian Canadian family and
their attitude towards educations. Also, a listing of language groups
and their respective drop out rates from Toronto public schools.
education  Romanian  schools  John_Lorinc  school_districts  achievement_gaps  TDSB  dropouts 
january 2009 by jerryking
A+ for cultural capital
Jun. 27, 2006 G&M op-ed by Margaret Wente on immigrant
students in Toronto … fully 43% of Toronto’s secondary school students
were born outside Canada. For all the hardships faced by new immigrants
to Canada, many of their kids are the brightest of the bright. And they
also make up a disproportionate share of dropouts. It appears that how
well these students do in school has far more to do with where they’re
from than how long they’ve been here...The education system is supposed
to be the great equalizer. So what can the schools do about these
achievement gaps? People in Toronto are discussing all the usual stuff
-- a more inclusive curriculum, more ethnic teachers, more outreach to
families, more rejection of ethnic stereotypes, and, of course, an end
to discrimination. But the education system's ability to equalize the
outcomes is probably severely limited. That's because cultural capital
is formed at home and formed early.
achievement_gaps  high_schools  performance  Toronto  Margaret_Wente  schools  immigrants  TDSB  school_districts  dropouts  disproportionality  education  outcomes  cultural_capital  hardships 
january 2009 by jerryking

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