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jerryking : adjustments   7

Canada beware: We are suffering a great depression in commodity prices - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL BLISS
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 15, 2016

The Great Depression of the 1930s used to be understood as a worldwide structural crisis that was partly an adjustment to the great expansion of crop acreage and other primary industries undertaken to meet the demands of the First World War. Unfortunately the history of those years now tends to be viewed through the distorting lenses of economists fixated on monetary policy and financial crisis management.

They thought that the crisis of 2008 might become a replay of the 1930s. For the most part they have not realized that it is today’s global depression in commodity prices that has eerie echoes of the great crack-up. If it’s true that we have overexpanded our productive capacity to meet the demands of Chinese growth, and if that growth is now going to slow, or even cease, then history is worrisomely on the verge of repeating itself....One sign of the beginning of wisdom is to be able to shed illusions. Make no mistake. Right now, the world is experiencing a great depression in commodity prices, led by the collapse of oil, that represents an enormous shrinkage in the valuation of our wealth. As a country whose wealth is still highly dependent on the returns we can get from selling our natural resources, Canada is very vulnerable. In a time of price depression, our wealth bleeds away.
'30s  adjustments  commodities  commodities_supercycle  economic_downturn  Great_Depression  historians  history  illusions  Michael_Bliss  natural_resources  overcapacity  pricing  overexpansion  slow_growth  wisdom  WWI 
january 2016 by jerryking
Don’t blame the flu for ER congestion - The Globe and Mail
ANDRÉ PICARD
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 06 2015,

Our emergency rooms are overflowing because of bad planning and misplaced priorities....Influenza is one of the most common and predictable infectious diseases on Earth. In Canada, it spreads from west to east and peaks at roughly the same time each year, near the end of December or early January.

Just as predictably, hospital ERs are besieged, most notably during the Christmas to New Year’s period.

There is more illness in the winter – not just flu, but gastroenteritis, colds and other pathogens spread by coughing and sneezing in close quarters....The larger issue is that our health system does nothing to anticipate and adjust to these problems. On the contrary, it is irresponsibly inflexible.

During the holiday season, retail outlets extend their hours, add additional staff, stock more supplies, and so on. All sensible stuff – Planning 101, if you will – designed to make life easier for the consumer.

Hospitals, and the health system more generally, do the opposite: During the holiday season, they reduce or close a range of services, from hospital beds to primary care clinics, and funnel patients to jam-packed emergency rooms.
adjustments  André_Picard  anticipating  community_care  congestion  emergency_rooms  flu_outbreaks  pathogens  planning  primary-care  healthcare  home_care  hospitals  inflexibility  influenza  overcapacity  overflow 
january 2015 by jerryking
Identify new growth niche and how you can profit
March 19, 2013 | Financial Post | By Rick Spence.

Sparks: What other companies need unlikely solutions? How could you help them with data management, management of perishables, or guaranteeing consistent quality?
Sparks: What niche information markets could you develop and own? Or, what services could you offer to celebrity startups that have everything except business experience?
Spark: Retailers are eager to lock up new brands to differentiate themselves. How can you help more marketers achieve a competitive advantage?
Spark: What other marginal products and businesses will tech giants such as Google and Facebook drop next? How can you help users adjust? Or, what under-performers should you be trimming from your own product roster?
Sparks: Designers and builders should target early adopters eager for a colour makeover.
Spark: Where else can you find a business whose margins are so huge that Buy-One, Get-Three-Free makes sense? Or, when big names are offering value propositions like this, how can you retool your promotions and sales to compete?
Spark: How could you solve major problems like these without a supercomputer?
Spark: Gadgetry is changing so fast that even markets you thought had stabilized are wide open to new ideas. How can you use hot new technology to disrupt your industry?
Rick_Spence  growth  niches  entrepreneur  kill_rates  IBM_Watson  massive_data_sets  celebrities  ideas  entrepreneurship  new_businesses  solutions  disruption  under-performing  early_adopters  competitive_advantage  perishables  information_markets  adjustments  data_management  culling  differentiation  retailers  brands 
march 2013 by jerryking
Tips for asking better questions
Converse, don't interrogate - distinguishes how to exchange with a mentor vs a peer. Offer my own thoughts as away of encouraging a real conversation. Give intelligence to others as this will nudge them to reciprocate.
Adjust the lens - when trying to make a decision, ask wide questions to identify the criteria to be used (5 W's), ask narrow questions to identify the weight to be assigned to each. Narrow questions invites specific, often factual answers about the specific area of inquiry--and nothing else.
Frame and prime - construct the question in multiple ways for high quality intelligence
Follow up and probe - to gain better intelligence beyond a single question
Reid_Hoffman  tips  LinkedIn  Communicating_&_Connecting  questions  conversations  follow-up_questions  adjustments  generosity  wide-framing  narrow-framing  5_W’s 
march 2012 by jerryking
All I ever needed to know about change management - - Organization - Change Management
MAY 1997 | McKinsey Quarterly | ROGER DICKHOUT offers 5 basic
premises to help clients design organizational change programs—ideas
Dickout considers as natural laws:
(1) the law of constituent balance--change driven by an imbalance
between a company’s stakeholders: shareholders, employees, customers,
communities, & mgmt.
(2) the law of leverage. Max. the return on effort by changing those
things that will produce the greatest results/really matter.
(3) the law of momentum. Liberate the energy to drive the change. Change
is work. Work requires energy. That energy can be introduced from
outside—e.g. pressure from shareholders or new mgmt.—or the system’s own
potential energy can be transformed into kinetic energy.
(4) the law of feedback and adjustment. Learn how your organization
responds to change, and adjust the program accordingly. N.B.Change may
itself create opportunity.
(5) the law of leadership.Leadership is the scarce resource and
ultimately, the catalyst of change.
adjustments  change  change_management  constituencies  creating_opportunities  feedback  imbalances  leadership  leverage  McKinsey  momentum  OPMA  organizational_change  return_on_effort  what_really_matters 
april 2011 by jerryking

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