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jerryking : admissions   74

Texas top ten percent policy provides a cautionary lesson
July 8, 2019 | hechingerreport | by JILL BARSHAY

Texas’s policy to automatically admit the top students in each high school to the state’s flagship universities didn’t expand the number of high schools that send students to Texas A&M University, College Station.

One proposal to boost the number of black and Latino students in elite schools is to cream the top students from every neighborhood or community, rather than admitting only the top students on a national or statewide yardstick. That way the brightest Latino students in a predominantly Latino school, for example, can get a shot at a coveted slot that they otherwise might not get. Bill de Blasio, New York City mayor and Democratic presidential candidate, has floated this idea for diversifying his city’s elite high schools.

But the state of Texas provides a cautionary lesson for how much this sort of well-intended reform can accomplish. Research is showing that a policy that takes the top students from the state’s high schools didn’t increase diversity in Texas’s elite universities or increase the number of high schools that feed them.
admissions  affirmative_action  African-Americans  cautionary_tales  Colleges_&_Universities  diversity  elitism  high-achieving  high_schools  Latinos  students  Texas  workarounds 
july 2019 by jerryking
You Got Into College. Here’s What You Should Know - WSJ
Editor’s note: This Future View offers advice about college to high-school seniors who have recently received offers of admission. For next week, we ask: “Is America’s obsession with the four-year degree elitist and parochial? Or is it practical, celebrating the best path to success for most people?” Students should click here to submit opinions of fewer than 250 words before April 9. The best responses will be published that night.
admissions  advice  Colleges_&_Universities 
april 2019 by jerryking
50 Years of Affirmative Action: What Went Right, and What It Got Wrong - The New York Times
By Anemona Hartocollis
March 30, 2019

Columbia and other competitive colleges had already begun changing the racial makeup of their campuses as the civil rights movement gained ground, but the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968, and the resulting student strikes and urban uprisings, prompted them to redouble their efforts.

They acted partly out of a moral imperative, but also out of fear that the fabric of society was being torn apart by racial conflict. They took chances on promising black students from poor neighborhoods they had long ignored, in addition to black students groomed by boarding schools......The debate over race in college admissions only intensified. By the late 1970s, colleges began emphasizing the value of diversity on campus over the case for racial reparations.

Today, Harvard and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are facing legal challenges to race-conscious admissions that could reach the Supreme Court. The Trump administration is investigating allegations of discrimination against Asian-American applicants at Harvard and Yale. University officials who lived through the history fear that the gains of the last 50 years could be rolled back.
'60s  admissions  affirmative_action  African-Americans  anniversaries  Colleges_&_Universities  Columbia  diversity  dropouts  Ivy_League  MLK 
march 2019 by jerryking
‘Lopping,’ ‘Tips’ and the ‘Z-List’: Bias Lawsuit Explores Harvard’s Admissions Secrets
July 29, 2018 | - The New York Times | By Anemona Hartocollis, Amy Harmon and Mitch Smith.
=======================================
One tries very hard to assess the candidate’s potential. Is he or she a self-starter? How much help has he had? Has the candidate peaked? How will he or she react to not being head of the class?

Does he or she have the core values, confidence, perspective and flexibility to adapt and thrive? Not surprisingly, companies and others prefer applicants who have what a law firm where I later recruited called “a can-do attitude.”
===============================
........The case has been orchestrated by Edward Blum, a longtime crusader against affirmative action and voting rights laws, and it may yield him a fresh chance to get the issue before the Supreme Court. The court turned away his last major challenge to university admissions, Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, in 2016.

[Read: How other Ivy League schools are coming to Harvard’s defense.]

The debate goes back to the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s. The assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968 was a turning point, pushing colleges to redouble their efforts to be more representative of American society.

But Asians were an overlooked minority despite a long history of discrimination. .......The plaintiffs say that the personal rating — which considers an applicant’s character and personality — is the most insidious of Harvard’s admissions metrics. They say that Asian-Americans are routinely described as industrious and intelligent, but unexceptional and indistinguishable — characterizations that recall painful stereotypes for many people of Asian descent. (The applicant who was the “proverbial picket fence” was Asian-American.).........Professor Khurana, the Harvard College dean, acknowledged that Harvard was not always perfect, but said it was trying to get its practices right.

“I have a great deal of humility knowing that some day history will judge us,” Professor Khurana said. “I think that’s why we are constantly asking ourselves this question: How can we do better? How could we be better? What are we missing? Where are our blind spots?”
admissions  affirmative_action  Asian-Americans  blind_spots  Colleges_&_Universities  discrimination  diversity  Harvard  Ivy_League  lawsuits  race-blind  race-conscious  selection_processes  biases  elitism  ethnic_stereotyping  meritocratic  students  racial_disparities  1968  core_values 
august 2018 by jerryking
Donors should propel Oxford down the Ivy League diversity road
May 26, 2018 | Financial Times | David Lammy.

Elite Eastern institutions are using aggressive outreach campaigns to attract applicants who might otherwise be unaware of the schools’ generous financial-aid packages.
diversity  Colleges_&_Universities  outreach  Oxford  applicants  economically_disadvantaged  United_Kingdom  alumni  admissions  minorities  Black_British  donations  donors  Ivy_League 
may 2018 by jerryking
The Future of Elite Schools in the Trump Era (and the Future of Blogging) - The Atlantic
James Fallows
3:05 PM / April 14, 2018

a message that came in from a reader in an elite-university college town. (OK: It’s New Haven.) He says that an under-appreciated aspect of Donald Trump’s war on expertise deserves further attention. .....From where I sit, the schools are woefully under-prepared for the Trump onslaught and I predict that they will get slammed and have to change their policies. To imagine what future Harvard classes will look like if the schools lose the court cases, look to what happened to Berkeley when they were constrained by Proposition 209 from considering using affirmative action policies-- the percentage of Asian American and White students increased, while Black and Latino representation decreased.

When I think about the rise of Trump, I believe that part of the blame should rest at the feet of Harvard, Yale and their peers.

Clinton, Bush, and Obama stacked their administration with graduates from these schools and the global economic system that they created (and profited from) had important flaws that hurt certain sectors of the US and provided fertile ground for Trump's dark vision of a sort of economic conspiracy holding back real Americans. As a group, they often were arrogant and felt that they knew best. Yet they also weren't smart enough to understand how the economic world that they created actually had some fundamental flaws that would come to threaten the elite global world view that they thought was inevitable.
James_Fallows  elitism  Ivy_League  Colleges_&_Universities  Red_states  Donald_Trump  expertise  Department_of_Justice  admissions 
april 2018 by jerryking
Opinion | How to Level the College Playing Field
April 7, 2018 | The New York Times | By Harold O. Levy with Peg Tyre. Mr. Levy is a former chancellor of the New York City public schools. He wrote this article with the education journalist Peg Tyre.

Despite the best efforts of many, the gap between the numbers of rich and poor college graduates continues to grow.

It’s true that access programs take some academically talented children from poor and working-poor families to selective colleges, but that pipeline remains frustratingly narrow. And some colleges and universities have adopted aggressive policies to create economic diversity on campus. But others are lagging. Too many academically talented children who come from families where household income hovers at the American median of $59,000 or below are shut out of college or shunted away from selective universities.....The wealthy spend tens of thousands each year on private school tuition or property taxes to ensure that their children attend schools that provide a rich, deep college preparatory curriculum. On top of that, many of them spend thousands more on application coaches, test-prep tutors and essay editors. ......
(1) Let’s start with alumni. It is common to harbor fond feelings toward your alma mater. But to be a responsible, forward-looking member of your college’s extended community, look a little deeper. Make it your business to figure out exactly who your college serves. What is the economic breakdown of the current student body? Some colleges trumpet data about underrepresented minorities and first-generation students. But many don’t. And either way, there are follow-up questions to ask. How has that mix changed over the past 10 years? What policies are in place to increase those numbers?
(2) Legacy admission must end.
(3) shorten the college tour.
(4) cities and states should help students who come from the middle and working classes with programs that provide intensive advising, money for textbooks and even MetroCards
(5) Refine the first two years of some four-year liberal arts education into an accredited associate degree.
(6) Stop acting like everyone already has the road map to college plotted. The college application system has become costly and baroque. Make it possible for high schools to hire, train and deploy enough guidance counselors.
(7) stop giving to your alma mater. Donors to top universities are getting hefty tax deductions to support a system that can seem calculated to ensure that the rich get richer. If you feel you must give, try earmarking your donation for financial aid for low-income, community college students who have applied to transfer to your alma mater.
Colleges_&_Universities  accessibility  legacies  roadmaps  admissions  op-ed  unfair_advantages  social_mobility  meritocratic  alumni  hereditary  nepotism  education  self-perpetuation  super_ZIPs  opportunity_gaps  college-educated  upper-income  compounded  low-income  elitism  selectivity  follow-up_questions 
april 2018 by jerryking
Diversity means looking for the knife in a drawerful of spoons
SEPTEMBER 8, 2017 | Financial Times | Tim Harford.

Recruiters and admissions tutors are hoping they made the right choices.

So how do we select the best people for a course or a job? It seems like a sensible question, yet it contains a trap. In selecting the best person we might set a test — in a restaurant kitchen we might ask them to whip up some meals; in a software company we might set some coding problems. And then the trap is sprung.

By setting the same task for every applicant we recruit people who are carbon copies of each other. They will have the same skills and think in the same way. Allowing recruiters some subjective discretion might loosen this trap a little, but it might equally make it worse: we all tend to see merit in applicants who look, speak, and dress much like we do. Opposites do not attract, especially when it comes to corporate hiring.

This is unfair, of course. But it is also — for many but not all tasks — very unwise. Scott Page, a complexity scientist and author of The Diversity Bonus, invites us to think of people as possessing a kind of cognitive toolbox. The tools might be anything from fluent Mandarin to knowing how to dress a turkey to a command of Excel keyboard shortcuts. If the range of skills — the size of the toolkit — matters, then a diverse team will boast more cognitive skills than a homogenous team, even one full of top performers.
admissions  diversity  heterogeneity  hiring  homogeneity  recruiting  selection_processes  teams  Tim_Harford 
november 2017 by jerryking
How We Are Ruining America
JULY 11, 2017 | The New York Times | David Brooks.

Over the past generation, members of the college-educated class have become amazingly good at making sure their children retain their privileged status. They have also become devastatingly good at making sure the children of other classes have limited chances to join their ranks.....Over the past few decades, upper-middle-class Americans have embraced behavior codes that put cultivating successful children at the center of life. As soon as they get money, they turn it into investments in their kids......Richard Reeves of the Brookings Institution recently published a book called “Dream Hoarders” detailing some of the structural ways the well educated rig the system.

The most important is residential zoning restrictions. Well-educated people tend to live in places like Portland, New York and San Francisco that have housing and construction rules that keep the poor and less educated away from places with good schools and good job opportunities.....second structural barrier is the college admissions game. Educated parents live in neighborhoods with the best teachers, they top off their local public school budgets and they benefit from legacy admissions rules, from admissions criteria that reward kids who grow up with lots of enriching travel and from unpaid internships that lead to jobs.....the structural barriers emphasized are less important than the informal social barriers that segregate the lower 80 percent (e.g. being aware of cultural signifiers around, say, gourmet food)

.......American upper-middle-class culture (where the opportunities are) is now laced with cultural signifiers that are completely illegible unless you happen to have grown up in this class (i.e. excelling at being socially graceful). They play on the normal human fear of humiliation and exclusion. Their chief message is, “You are not welcome here.”
David_Brooks  social_mobility  Colleges_&_Universities  socially_graceful  inequality  geographic_sorting  college-educated  super_ZIPs  self-perpetuation  values  opportunity_gaps  upper-income  social_exclusion  books  structural_barriers  admissions  elitism  social_classes  zoning  restrictions  social_barriers  cultural_signifiers  privilege  gaming_the_system  unfair_advantages  ruination  rituals 
july 2017 by jerryking
Harvard Accused of Bias Against Asian-Americans
A complaint Friday alleged that Harvard University discriminates against Asian-American applicants by setting a higher bar for admissions than that faced by other groups. The complaint, filed by a…
Harvard  Colleges_&_Universities  admissions  Asian-Americans  biases  elitism  achievement_gaps  ethnic_stereotyping  meritocratic  students  racial_disparities  Ivy_League 
may 2015 by jerryking
America’s elite: An hereditary meritocracy
Jan 24th 2015 | The Economist | Anonymous.

America has always had rich and powerful families, from the floor of the Senate to the boardrooms of the steel industry. But it has also held more fervently than any other country the belief that all comers can penetrate that elite as long as they have talent, perseverance and gumption....But now, the american elite is self-perpetuating by dint of school ties, wealth....Today’s elite is a long way from the rotten lot of West Egg. Compared to those of days past it is by and large more talented, better schooled, harder working (and more fabulously remunerated) and more diligent in its parental duties. It is not a place where one easily gets by on birth or connections alone. At the same time it is widely seen as increasingly hard to get into.

Some self-perpetuation by elites is unavoidable; the children of America’s top dogs benefit from nepotism just as those in all other societies do. But something else is now afoot. More than ever before, America’s elite is producing children who not only get ahead, but deserve to do so: they meet the standards of meritocracy better than their peers, and are thus worthy of the status they inherit....wealthy parents pass their advantage(s) on to their children....
Colleges_&_Universities  elitism  hereditary  Matthew_effect  nepotism  education  values  parenting  public_education  legacies  admissions  alumni  endowments  SAT  social_mobility  self-perpetuation  super_ZIPs  opportunity_gaps  college-educated  upper-income  compounded  meritocratic  cultural_transmission 
january 2015 by jerryking
Is admission to an elite university the be-all and end-all? - The Globe and Mail
SIMONA CHIOSE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Oct. 03 2014

William Deresiewicz, the author of Excellent Sheep, argues that, rather than rejoice at being admitted to such institutions, this elite-in-training should run the other way. In tours to capacity lecture halls, the former Yale literature professor tells students to stop mistaking ambition for direction; and to embrace the liberal arts, self-reflection and risk. Otherwise, the anxiety and unhappiness those students feel now, after a childhood and adolescence stage-managed by their parents, will flower into midlife crises and the realization of an existence neither examined nor fulfilled.

But Dr. Deresiewicz is not a counsellor. He’s a combative writer, a regular at The New Republic. The race to the top, he argues, is not just a waste of the best minds of a generation (the Ys and Zs), who are going into economics with only the smallest detours into Plato, Virginia Woolf or George Eliot; it has turned education from the great equalizer to a sharp cleaver, lacerating democracy (jk: fault lines).
admissions  anxiety  Colleges_&_Universities  education  elitism  fault_lines  Ivy_League  liberal_arts  risk-taking  self-reflection  social_exclusion  unhappiness 
october 2014 by jerryking
‘A National Admissions Office’ for Low-Income Strivers - NYTimes.com
SEPT. 16, 2014 | NYT | David Leonhardt.

QuestBridge has figured out how to convince thousands of high-achieving, low-income students that they really can attend a top college. “It’s like a national admissions office,” said Catharine Bond Hill, the president of Vassar.

The growth of QuestBridge has broader lessons for higher education — and for closing the yawning achievement gap between rich and poor teenagers. That gap is one of the biggest reasons that moving up the economic ladder is so hard in the United States today.

the larger lessons of QuestBridge are so important.

What are they? One, the complexity of the financial-aid process is scaring students away from college.

Two, large amounts of well-meaning scholarship money — from private sources as well as from Washington and state governments — is fairly ineffectual. .

Three, not every problem created by inequality is fiendishly difficult to solve.
Colleges_&_Universities  admissions  movingonup  QuestBridge  students  disadvantages  elitism  strivers  low-income  high-achieving 
september 2014 by jerryking
Harvard’s Sassy New Business-School Application - At Work - WSJ
Jul 2, 2014 B-SCHOOLS
Harvard’s Sassy New Business-School Application
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HBS  admissions 
july 2014 by jerryking
Genius New York High Schooler Accepted To All 8 Ivy League Schools
It seems like a lot of you don’t know how the college admission process works. You’re all talking about him “only” being ranked 11th in his class and only getting a 2250 on the SATs but th...
admissions  Colleges_&_Universities  race  Ivy_League  overachievers  high-achieving 
april 2014 by jerryking
Wharton Applications Drop 12% Over Four Years - WSJ.com
September 26, 2013 | WSJ | By MELISSA KORN
Wharton Applications Drop 12% Over Four Years
Business-School Experts and Students Say School Has Lost Its Luster
Wharton  admissions  business_schools  MBAs 
september 2013 by jerryking
Asians - Too Smart for Their Own Good? - NYTimes.com
By CAROLYN CHEN
Published: December 19, 2012

Asian-Americans constitute 5.6 percent of the nation’s population but 12 to 18 percent of the student body at Ivy League schools. But if judged on their merits — grades, test scores, academic honors and extracurricular activities — Asian-Americans are underrepresented at these schools. Consider that Asians make up anywhere from 40 to 70 percent of the student population at top public high schools like Stuyvesant and Bronx Science in New York City, Lowell in San Francisco and Thomas Jefferson in Alexandria, Va., where admissions are largely based on exams and grades.

In a 2009 study of more than 9,000 students who applied to selective universities, the sociologists Thomas J. Espenshade and Alexandria Walton Radford found that white students were three times more likely to be admitted than Asians with the same academic record.
admissions  education  Colleges_&_Universities  achievement_gaps  ethnic_stereotyping  meritocratic  students  racial_disparities  Asian-Americans  underrepresentation  Stuyvesant_High 
december 2012 by jerryking
Class-Based vs. Race-Based Admissions - NYTimes.com
Editorial
Class-Based vs. Race-Based Admissions
Published: November 18, 2012
op-ed  admissions  Colleges_&_Universities  race  social_classes 
november 2012 by jerryking
90 seconds to MBA acceptance - The Globe and Mail
JENNIFER LEWINGTON

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Oct. 19 2012
Rotman  Ivey  alumni  admissions  business_schools  MBAs 
october 2012 by jerryking
The price of admission - FT.com
October 19, 2012 5:03 pm
The price of admission

Gillian Tett By Gillian Tett
admissions  Gillian_Tett  Ivy_League  Oxford  elitism  Colleges_&_Universities  SUNY  cutbacks  alumni 
october 2012 by jerryking
Compassionate Action - WSJ.com
February 24, 2003 | WSJ |By BENJAMIN S. CARSON.

In a conversation recently with Gerhardt Casper, the former president of Stanford University, I learned that they had 1,600 freshmen slots and 19,000 applicants for those slots, 10,000 of which had 4.0 grade point averages. They, along with the Ivy League schools and select others, could easily fill the freshman class with 4.0 students. But what about the black student who grew up in the ghetto, in a single-parent home, looking over his shoulder for danger each day as he walked home and still managed to compile a 3.7 GPA and SAT scores in the 90th percentile? Or what about the student from Appalachia with a similar academic record whose father died in a mining accident and had to work and help raise his brothers and sisters?

Do we simply ignore such students or assuage our guilt by saying they don't have to attend one of the premier schools since there are many other excellent universities that would love to have them? Of course not. Instead, many universities take into account factors such as parental education, socioeconomic status, obstacles overcome, learning environment, living environment, responsibilities, special family circumstances, etc., which allows these students admission. The universities correctly reason that if these students could overcome such significant adversities in their lives, they will likely make great contributions to our nation.

This is the principle we should call "compassionate action," and I believe it is the right one for our current dilemma: While race-neutral, it takes a disadvantaged background into account and extends a helping hand to those who need it most. As it turns out, in the U.S., the largest percentage of people from disadvantaged backgrounds happen to be blacks and Hispanics. Those groups will be given a slightly lower bar because of their real difficulties, not from a presumption that their skin color requires it.
affirmative_action  economically_disadvantaged  U.S._Supreme_Court  admissions  race-neutrality  Stanford  applications  SAT  education  students  compassion  Appalachia  disadvantages  GPA  presumptions 
august 2012 by jerryking
At CUNY, an Ethnic Shift Because of Stricter Admissions - NYTimes.com
May 23, 2012, 10:34 am
At CUNY, an Ethnic Shift Because of Stricter Admissions
By TANYA CALDWELL
New_York_City  admissions  Colleges_&_Universities  diversity  minorities 
may 2012 by jerryking
College-Bound Cast Wider Net - WSJ.com
April 5, 2012 | WSJ |By JENNIFER LEVITZ, MELISSA KORN and SCOTT THURM
Colleges_&_Universities  admissions  Ivy_League 
april 2012 by jerryking
What Can U.S. Universities Do About a Student Stampede in Johannesburg? - NYTimes.com
January 10, 2012, 12:36 pm
What Can U.S. Universities Do About a Student Stampede in Johannesburg?
By ANDREW C. REVKIN
South_Africa  Colleges_&_Universities  MIT  admissions 
january 2012 by jerryking
How to Get Into Harvard - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 30, 2007 | WSJ | By ELLEN GAMERMAN.
A WSJ study finds that certain high schools have a remarkable record of
sending their students to elite colleges. Send to Jason, Asha &
Jazmin.
admissions  howto  Harvard  Colleges_&_Universities  Ivy_League  high_schools 
august 2011 by jerryking
College Applications Continue to Increase. When Is Enough Enough? -
November 5, 2010 | NYTimes.com | By ERIC HOOVER. Applications
are, of course, a proxy for popularity and metric of merit. Such is the
allure of exclusivity, and the appeal of simplicity. Measuring quality
is difficult; measuring quantity is as easy as counting. The more apps a
college receives, and rejects, the more impressive it seems.

Today’s application inflation is a cause and symptom of the uncertainty
in admissions. As application totals soar, colleges struggle to predict
yield — the number of admitted students who actually attend — leading to
longer wait lists and other competitive enrollment tactics. Students
hedge against the plummeting admissions rates by flooding the system
with even more applications.
admissions  Colleges_&_Universities  exclusivity  applications  selectivity 
november 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Columnist - The Roots Of White Anxiety - NYTimes.com
July 18, 2010 | New York Times | by ROSS DOUTHAT. "...what
was striking, as Russell K. Nieli pointed out last week on the
conservative Web site Minding the Campus, was which whites were most
disadvantaged by the process: the downscale, the rural and the
working-class.......But cultural biases seem to be at work as well.
Nieli highlights one of the study’s more remarkable findings: while most
extracurricular activities increase your odds of admission to an elite
school, holding a leadership role or winning awards in organizations
like high school R.O.T.C., 4-H clubs and Future Farmers of America
actually works against your chances. Consciously or unconsciously, the
gatekeepers of elite education seem to incline against candidates who
seem too stereotypically rural or right-wing or “Red America.”
Colleges_&_Universities  elitism  Ivy_League  root_cause  admissions  working_class  reverse_discrimination  resentments  grievances  whites  rural  biases  stereotypes 
july 2010 by jerryking
When Success Follows the College Rejection Letter - WSJ.com
MARCH 24, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By SUE SHELLENBARGER.
Before They Were Titans, Moguls and Newsmakers, These People
Were...Rejected....At College Admission Time, Lessons in Thin Envelopes.
bouncing_back  Colleges_&_Universities  Sue_Shellenbarger  harvard  admissions  rejections  adversity 
march 2010 by jerryking
Current Trends in MBA Admissions - Interview with Knewton CEO Jose Ferreira
Current Trends in MBA Admissions
Interview with Knewton CEO Jose Ferreira

By Karen Schweitzer, About.com Guide
admissions  trends  business_schools  ufsc  MBAs 
march 2010 by jerryking
Not by Tuition Breaks Alone - WSJ.com
MAY 2, 2008 | Wall Street Journal pg. W11| by NAOMI SCHAEFER
RILEY. Details Riley's struggle to help her niece complete her college
admission forms and the disinterest/lack of assistance from high school
guidance counsellors.

"What stands between disadvantaged kids and college is not mere money.
It is orderliness, attentive mentoring and simple organizational
guidance."
African-Americans  Colleges_&_Universities  high_schools  admissions  procedures  disadvantages  disorganization  NaomiSchaeferRiley  economically_disadvantaged 
march 2009 by jerryking

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