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Ad Giant Wins Over Disney With Big Data Pitch
Oct. 15, 2019 | The New York Times | By Tiffany Hsu.

Advertising pitches have come a long way since the 1960s, when creative teams tried to impress potential clients with snappy slogans, catchy jingles and arresting visuals while pledging to attract the housewife segment or the businessman demographic.

These days, big companies look to ad companies for their data smarts as much as their marketing expertise. The agencies with the most persuasive pitches are those that have increasingly personalized data on the patterns and preferences of a broad range of consumers.

Disney already has plenty of data on its customers. But the prospect of precisely targeting potential moviegoers, theme-park visitors, hotel guests and subscribers for its coming Disney Plus streaming service appealed to the company, according to two people familiar with the pitch process.

While the Disney-Publicis deal may benefit both companies, some worry that it may put consumer privacy at risk.

“This is in essence creating a data broker division to Disney, expanding what Disney already knows, which is a lot,” said Jeffrey Chester, the executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy, a nonprofit consumer advocacy group. “You’re telling your entire life history to Mickey Mouse.”

On Nov. 12, the Disney will start its streaming challenger to Netflix, Disney Plus.
In North America, Publicis will take charge of media strategy for the Disney Plus streaming service as well as Disney resorts and amusement parks. Epsilon was a major draw because of the extremely detailed data it has compiled. The company may very well know if you are lactose intolerant or are in the market for a pickup truck with 60,000 miles on it. If you are into astrology or have taken out a home-equity loan, it may know that too. Epsilon could, for example, beam a Disney Plus ad to parents who have bought a Lion King costume for their toddler.....“They have the capacity to really understand who is a likely prospect for the streaming service and where that person resides online, and they can send messages in the appropriate media to that individual,” .....most of the advertising industry is struggling to compete against Facebook and Google, analysts said. The platforms dominate the business of buying and selling digital ads, leaving the agencies little room to negotiate. Facebook and Google have also started working directly with many advertising clients, luring them away from traditional ad companies.

In leaning on data to improve its fortunes, Publicis is part of a larger industry trend. Dentsu bought a majority stake in the data marketing firm Merkle Group in 2016, and Interpublic Group bought the data marketing firm Acxiom in 2018.....a “huge consolidation” within advertising that has allowed huge holding companies to gobble up agencies and data companies that are increasingly looking for ways to advertise using personal data.

He said that viewership data from the ad-free Disney Plus, including details involving children, could be passed on to Epsilon, which could use the information to target consumers with marketing for other Disney offerings.

“It’s Madison Avenue bringing you Silicon Valley,”
advertising  advertising_agencies  analytics  big_bets  data  Disney  Epsilon  Madison_Avenue  marketing  Omnicom  personal_data  pitches  privacy  Publicis  Silicon_Valley  streaming  target_marketing  theme_parks 
october 2019 by jerryking
The Ad Industry Has High Hopes for Direct-to-Consumer Businesses
June 17, 2019 | WSJ | By Nat Ives.

Advertising has turned its attention to what it hopes will be the next new engine of growth for the industry: direct-to-consumer marketers.

Direct-to-consumer businesses, which offer everything from mattresses to toothbrushes to home workouts, start by cutting out middlemen such as physical retail distributors. And they relentlessly focus on measures such as the cost to acquire a new customer—while relying on advertising, usually on social media, as the main way to grow.......ad executives hope that the booming DTC business can become a major new revenue source for the industry.....DTC brands play in an apparently unlimited range of products and could have rapid expansion ahead.

A varied field
Measures of DTC activity vary, but all indicate rapid growth. For a picture of U.S. ad spending by DTC companies, Magna tracks a basket of 13 companies that it considers disrupters, including footwear seller Allbirds Inc. and bedding marketer Casper Sleep Inc. Their spending increased 35% last year to $378 million, and is likely to grow another 30% this year and 25% next year.

And they’re spreading out from their usual advertising havens such as social media. The 13 brands’ national TV spending soared 42% in 2018 to $137 million, for instance, and is expected to rise 34% this year and 25% in 2020, Magna says........For some DTC brands, diversification is partly about protection.....Bombas LLC decided to move a big chunk of its marketing budget away from Facebook .....fearing its strategy could be hurt if the social network unexpectedly changed an algorithm or shifted a policy......Diversification is also a matter of taking growth to another level. DTC brands are “reaching the scale where they want to talk to the mass market, to consumers everywhere in the country, not just the trendsetters,” ......After a certain point for a DTC brand, increasing spending in the same place begins to produce diminishing returns, says Heidi Zak, co-founder and co-chief executive at DTC bra company ThirdLove Inc. The company says it has sold more than four million bras since it started taking orders in 2014, and has had annualized revenue growth of 180% over the past four years. It declines to disclose its sales figures or ad budget.

“Today, when people ask me where we are, I say pretty much everywhere,” Ms. Zak says, rattling off advertising channels including Facebook, Pinterest , search, podcasts, radio, direct mail, print and TV. The company ran its first national branding campaign last fall to advance a theme of “To Each, Her Own”—with a longer-term goal rather than immediate sales.
advertising  advertising_agencies  booming  brands  customer_acquisition  direct-to-consumer  diversification  out-of-home  self-protection  social_media  store_openings 
june 2019 by jerryking
‘Math men’ not mad men rule advertising’s data age, says Lévy
May 5, 2019 | Financial Times | by Anna Nicolaou.

Maurice Levy: 'The future [of advertising] is based on data. It is not based on any mass media.' We know that mass media is [declining] every day,” “And if an advertising agency wants to have a future, data is absolutely indispensable.”

the advertising industry was undergoing a “metamorphosis” that required big bets.......As consumers shift attention away from pricey television commercials and towards the internet, where Facebook and Google dominate, the industry is more “math men” than mad men......In light of digital disruption Publicis, the world’s third-largest advertising agency by revenues, has made a big bet on data. In April the company made its largest acquisition with the purchase of Epsilon, a digital marketing company owned by Alliance Data Systems......Like its rivals WPP and Omnicom, Publicis is under pressure as Facebook and Google have disintermediated the traditional agency model. The two tech groups account for two-thirds of digital advertising sales in the US.....The industry has been consolidating as traditional agencies look to position themselves as data analytics gurus who can help brands target shoppers online. Last year Interpublic bought data business Acxiom for $2bn, while just last month buzzy agency Droga5 sold itself to Accenture......Despite lingering fears that an economic slowdown is looming, “the situation is much better now,”.... making the Epsilon decision easier. “The fastest-growing segment in our industry is data, technology, internet. Period. All the rest is suffering.”
advertising  advertising_agencies  analytics  big_bets  data  decline  disruption  disintermediation  Epsilon  Facebook  Google  Interpublic  Mad_Men  marketing  mass_media  mathematics  Maurice_Lévy  Omnicom  Publicis  WPP 
may 2019 by jerryking
Barbara Gardner Proctor Became a Role Model for African-American Women
Jan. 25, 2019 | WSJ | By James R. Hagerty.

Barbara Gardner Proctor applied for a Small Business Administration loan to start an advertising firm in 1970, she was asked what her collateral was. “Me,” she replied. That turned out to be solid backing for the loan. Her Chicago-based firm, Proctor & Gardner Advertising Inc., lasted for 25 years and worked for clients including Kraft Foods and Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Though the firm never had more than a couple dozen employees, she became a role model for African-American women staking out positions of influence.
advertising  advertising_agencies  African-Americans  Barbara_Proctor  public_relations  trailblazers  women  Chicago  concision  writing  obituaries 
january 2019 by jerryking
Meet the New Advertising Agency: Consulting Firms - WSJ
By Lara O’Reilly
June 18, 2018

Competition in the advertising industry used to mean little more than Madison Avenue agencies vying with each other for business.

Now an agency’s competitors include Silicon Valley giants such as Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Facebook Inc., who are cutting out the middleman and working directly with advertisers. Meanwhile, a growing number of ad-agency clients are building in-house advertising capabilities. And consulting firms including Accenture , ACN -0.25% Deloitte and PricewaterhouseCoopers have been bolstering the services they offer clients by buying up ad agencies and design firms that craft things like apps, websites, events and even products.

Accenture Interactive has the largest marketing-services business among consulting firms. Its revenue increased 35% last year to $6.5 billion, and it has been ranked as the leading digital advertising network world-wide by Ad Age three years in a row.
Accenture  advertising_agencies  advertising  CMOs  management_consulting  marketing 
june 2018 by jerryking
Technology has upended the world’s advertising giants - Mad men adrift
March 31st, 2018 | The Economist |

The world’s advertising giants are struggling to adapt to a landscape suddenly dominated by the duopoly of Google and Facebook. Some of their biggest clients, such as Procter & Gamble (P&G) and Unilever, are also being disrupted, in their case by smaller online brands and by Amazon. They are cutting spending on advertising services, and also building more capabilities in-house. Consultancies with digital expertise such as Deloitte and Accenture are competing with agencies, arguing that they know how to connect with consumers better, and more cheaply, using data, machine learning and app design.......This month Marc Pritchard, chief brand officer of P&G, criticised their (i.e. the ad giants) model as a “Mad Men” operation that is “archaic” and overly complex in an era when campaigns and ads need to be designed and refined quickly across lots of platforms.

Technological forces are buffeting this model.

(1) The first big challenge is disintermediation. Despite the growing backlash against the tech giants, Google and Facebook make it easy for firms big and small to advertise on their platforms and across the internet via their powerful ad networks.
(2) The second headache is the rise of ad-free content for consumers, especially on Netflix, and the corresponding disruption of ad-supported television, which has declining viewership globally.
(3) Third, Amazon’s e-commerce might, and the growing clout of internet-era direct-to-consumer upstarts, have weakened the distribution muscle and pricing power of the advertising giants’ biggest clients.....cost discipline among clients is driven partly by the influence of thrifty private-equity investors like 3G, the Brazilian owner of AB InBev, the world’s largest brewer......Sir Martin argues that the budgetary pressures that have forced his clients to cut back on advertising are a cyclical problem, not like the structural challenges posed by technological disruption.

In private, however, a senior executive at a rival ad-holding firm rejects much of this optimism. Technological disruption and disintermediation, he says, will only deepen. The efficiency of targeted digital ads means companies can spend less for the same outcome in branding. ....The advertising firms are responding by hiring away talent, acquiring businesses (in 2015 Publicis bought Sapient, a digital consultancy, for $3.7bn) and gradually changing how they make money. Their plans mostly boil down to two things: investing in digital services and consolidating their collections of businesses so that they can provide a range of services to one client more cheaply under one account.
advertising  economics  marketing  advertising_agencies  Martin_Sorrell  digital_strategies  WPP  Google  Facebook  Amazon  competitive_landscape  P&G  Unilever  disruption  Deloitte  Accenture  Publicis  Omnicom  via:sparkey  ad-tech  programmatic  direct-to-consumer 
april 2018 by jerryking
Hard sell for the ad men
| Financial Times |

Consumer goods groups are cutting costs amid slowing growth – the advertising industry is first to feel the pinch
CPG  cost-cutting  shareholder_activism  advertising  Big_Food  advertising_agencies  P&G  bots  marketing  budgets  Unilever  ABInBev  Mondelez  WPP  Interpublic  brands  Nestlé  slow_growth 
august 2017 by jerryking
An Ad Woman at the Top of an Industry That She Thinks Still Has Far to Go - The New York Times
APRIL 24, 2017 | NYT | By SAPNA MAHESHWARI.

The American workplace and the ad industry have evolved strikingly since then, but perhaps not fast enough. On Tuesday evening, Ms. Williams will be the first African-American woman with a creative agency background — the class of executives exalted on “Mad Men” — to be inducted into the Advertising Hall of Fame, which was established in 1948.

Ms. Williams, the founder of Carol H. Williams Advertising, got her start at Leo Burnett in Chicago. There she coined the tagline for Secret deodorant — “Strong enough for a man, but made for a woman” — and helped sell Americans on Pillsbury canned frosting back when the boxed version was in vogue.....Ms. Williams eventually became the first woman to be a creative director at Leo Burnett, but her career was not without challenges. She learned to ignore or detach herself from situations where men would say culturally “unacceptable” things, she said, and advanced without having a female boss or peer “to derive mentorship from.”........“In those days, I saw people would execute a project because they enjoyed executing the project and the project was just that to them,” she said. “Whereas when I would execute a project, it impacted the bottom line.”....Ms. Williams said the industry still had work to do in connecting with African-Americans. She is concerned that agencies catering to multicultural audiences employ mass marketing strategies that look to target such consumers simply by casting minorities in ads, or making assumptions based on social media data.

“It becomes an issue of, ‘If they see themselves in a commercial, they’ll buy the product,’ rather than it being about the messaging and how that messaging is delivered to them,” she said.

Some companies are also using digital technology to “withdraw what they perceive as insights out of these communities,” she added, instead of “developing research techniques to really get to know this culture.”
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
The 3% Conference, which supports female creative leadership at agencies, has estimated that only 11 percent of creative directors are women, even as they account for half of the industry’s work force. For black women, the field is even tougher: Last month, the Interpublic Group publicized statistics from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission showing that fewer than 1 percent of executives in advertising, public relations and related services are black women.
advertising  advertising_agencies  African-Americans  Carol_Williams  EEOC  Interpublic  Leo_Burnett  public_relations  trailblazers  women 
april 2017 by jerryking
Leaner and meaner; Advertising agencies
Technology has made life harder for admen, but they will not disappear

GAUGING THE STATE of health of the advertising industry is easy: just stroll along the waterfront in Cannes when the admen hol...
advertising_agencies  WPP  Martin_Sorrell  Publicis  ad-tech  Omnicom 
february 2017 by jerryking
Advertising: Facebook and Google build a duopoly
JUNE 23, 2016 | Financial Times | by Matthew Garrahan.

Google and Facebook compete in some areas such as digital video advertising but are present “across every part of the food chain”, according to one ad executive. This seismic shift to a digital and mobile ad landscape effectively controlled by two companies has wide repercussions for agencies, media buyers, publishers and the brands that want to sell more products.

Advertisers like the targeting they get with Facebook and the trove of data it has on its 1.6bn users, just as they like the efficiency of Google search. But they are worried about a concentration of market power in two companies that not only own the playing field but are able to set the rules of the game as well.

Facebook and Google “are hegemons” that could soon be taking campaigns away from television, says Brian Wieser, analyst with Pivotal Research. Paul Frampton, chief executive of Havas Media Group UK, says they are “black boxes” that have too much power. “They don’t give agencies or the brands access to their algorithms and the data being mined are for Google and Facebook — and not for the brand.”
advertising  advertising_agencies  Facebook  Google  Amazon  WPP  duopolies  media_buyers  dislocations  Mary_Meeker  seismic_shifts 
february 2017 by jerryking
Buy, buy, baby
Sep 13th 2014 | The Economist

The advertising industry is going through something akin to the automation of the financial markets in the 1980s. This has helped to make advertising much more precise and personalised. Some advertising agencies and media companies have told their executives to read “Flash Boys” by Michael Lewis, a book about Wall Street’s high-speed traders, to make quite sure they get the message......Real-time bidding sounds high-tech but straightforward. When a consumer visits a website, his browser communicates with an ad server. The server sends a message to an exchange to provide data about that user, such as his IP address, his location and the website he is visiting. Potential ad buyers send their bids to the exchange. The highest one wins and an ad is served when the website loads. All this typically takes about 150 milliseconds.

In reality, though, the ad-tech ecosystem is stupefyingly complex. Luma Partners, an investment bank, has put together the "Lumascape", a bafflingly crowded organisational chart showing several hundred firms competing in this market. Sellers of advertising space often go through technology firms: a "supply-side platform" (SSP) helps publishers sell their inventory, and a "demand-side platform" (DSP) gives access to buyers. Many choose a data-management platform (DMP) to store and buy information about users.

Advanced behavioural targeting, which uses technology to reach specific users with the desired characteristics, helped advertisers increase their return on investment by 30-50%. One popular tactic is "retargeting", which allows advertisers to look for people who have visited their website before and show them an ad related to an item they were looking for but did not buy.
online_advertising  programmatic  advertising  advertising_agencies  LBMA  behavioural_targeting  location_based_services  automation  real-time  algorithms  ad-tech  auctions  ROI 
february 2017 by jerryking
Mark Penn Is Out to Reinvent the Ad Holding Company - WSJ
By NATHALIE TADENA
May 12, 2016

Armed with $250 million in funding, Mark Penn is building what he hopes will be a new kind of advertising conglomerate, Stagwell Group, to challenge the ultra-scale-driven model of the four giant “holding companies” that dominate the marketplace.
reinvention  Madison_Avenue  advertising_agencies  Mark_Penn  private_equity 
may 2016 by jerryking
The networker: Martin Sorrell of WPP - FT.com
March 13, 2015| FT | Andrew Hill.

After 30 years, WPP now embraces some of the best-known names in marketing, advertising and public relations, including Ogilvy & Mather, J Walter Thompson and Burson-Marsteller.
In the process, Sorrell has become one of the best-connected executives in the world....Sorrell performs a similar role at WPP, using a combination of visionary pronouncements and obsessive micromanagement of clients, finances and employees. ....later this year a new chairman, Roberto Quarta, will take over. Quarta, a tough Italian-American with a background in private equity, is expected to be less submissive to WPP’s chief executive than previous chairmen. The question of how long Sorrell ­continues in his role, who could succeed him, and what will happen to the WPP empire if he goes, will be the most important issue on Quarta’s desk....“[If] I have been behaving as an owner, rather than as a ‘highly paid manager’ . . . mea culpa. I thought that was the object of the exercise,” he wrote.
Martin_Sorrell  WPP  advertising  advertising_agencies  succession  deal-making  WEF_Davos  legacies  JWT  Ogilvy_&_Mather  owners  Burson-Marsteller 
march 2015 by jerryking
Behind Martin Sorrell’s Data Binge - CMO Today - WSJ
Mar 12, 2015 | WSJ | By NATHALIE TADENA.

Sorrell, this is about putting his sprawling holding company in control of all the various data marketers are demanding nowadays to make sense of their ad campaigns. They want to know a lot about who is viewing. They want to know which TV shows or Web sites are ideal to reach their desired audience. And ultimately, they want to know how much an ad contributes to an actual sale of a product or service.

By becoming a global data powerhouse, WPP hopes to help clients draw connections across different data sources, better target audiences and ultimately improve the effectiveness of their advertising dollars.
data_sources  Martin_Sorrell  WPP  mergers_&_acquisitions  ROI  CMOs  M&A  data  metrics  measurements  advertising_agencies  advertising  marketing  data_driven  targeting  target_marketing 
march 2015 by jerryking
Shelly Lazarus: A front seat witness to advertising's gender shift - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 29 2015

You started at Ogilvy when David Ogilvy was still around. What was the best advice he ever gave you?

If you attract the right people and you create an environment where they’re as successful as they can possibly be, everything follows from that. ... He judged the output vigorously. He would have divine discontent, we would say. Nothing was ever good enough. If we said, okay, the work could be better, how do we get there? He would go back to either better people, or a better environment where they could do better work. Every answer came back to the quality of the people.
advice  advertising_agencies  Shelly_Lazarus  women  advertising  people_skills  resilience  bouncing_back  dissatisfaction  Managing_Your_Career  Ogilvy_&_Mather  Susan_Krashinsky  David_Ogilvy  Pablo_Picasso  professional_service_firms  the_right_people 
february 2015 by jerryking
Harry Yates: The man with the brand - The Globe and Mail
FRED LANGAN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jul. 15 2014,
advertising  advertising_agencies  obituaries  Volkswagen  DDB  Avis  brands  Cuba  vacations 
july 2014 by jerryking
Digital rethink: Google's new high-tech pitch to marketers - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, May. 05 2014,

The former chief marketing officer of L’Oreal Canada is just a few weeks into her new role at Google Canada as the liaison with marketing executives like her. She’ll be selling marketers on how Google can play a bigger role in their communication with customers. Her role – director of consumer packaged goods and branding for Canada – did not exist before. (She is also marketing director for Quebec.)...Within the past year, Google has been making a greater effort to woo both advertisers and their agencies on its technology. At its root is an attempt to get a bigger slice of ad budgets by persuading clients and agencies to think about digital as a more central part of their advertising....“In old marketing it used to be, if we had the right price, the right communication in the marketing, the right [point of purchase strategy] and the right TV ad, we were great,” she said. “The brand ecosystem has enlarged. It’s not about when the brand wants to talk to the consumer; it’s when the consumer feels like hearing it … it’s the consumer coming to the brand where it’s relevant – assuming the brand is there.”...But Google wants to show marketers how others have used its APIs – the coding that can enable digital campaigns – so that they can see what already exists without needing to build a campaign from scratch.

“Marketers understand they need to talk the way consumers talk,” Ms. Lamothe said. “… They don’t see it as, ‘Here’s a campaign from this brand, and then three months later there’s another campaign.’ They just think of the brand. If it’s always on, it always exists, and I find the brand where they’re relevant. The consumer is way ahead of the industry in the way they consume digital, because they make it part of their everyday life … and yet we don’t market that way.”
APIs  brands  campaigns  Susan_Krashinsky  marketing  Google  L'Oreal  CMOs  digital_media  advertising_agencies  advertising  LBMA  CPG 
june 2014 by jerryking
Ad executive Winston Binch preaches the importance of invention - The Globe and Mail
May. 15 2014 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER.

Q: You spoke about the way advertising is migrating more toward inventing things – a big trend for advertisers looking to get noticed.

A: Agencies have been making products for a long time. Alcohol brands have been invented by plenty of agencies, for example. But it used to be an idea and you’d outsource the production. What’s different now is a lot more of it is technology, it’s digitally based. That requires new people in the building. ... There’s a lot of talk about invention right now in advertising. It’s startup culture."....The difficult thing is selling [invention/innovation] to clients. A lot of our clients all know they need to do it, and they want to, but it’s hard to find room for it given the demands of their businesses, particularly the Fortune 500s. ... They’re more concerned with short term than long term. Innovation is seen as a long-term thing. And also hasn’t been in marketing organizations; usually IT, product design and R&D, not the marketing side. How do we sell more invention products to our clients?
Susan_Krashinsky  inventions  advertising  advertising_agencies  hard_to_find  data_driven  digital_media  long-term  innovation  ideas  storytelling  experimentation  Fortune_500  product_development  large_companies 
may 2014 by jerryking
Omnicom and Publicis Say They Will Merge - WSJ.com
July 28, 2013 | WSJ | By RUTH BENDER And SUZANNE VRANICA

Omnicom and Publicis Say They Will Merge
Omnicom  Publicis  advertising_agencies  mergers_&_acquisitions 
august 2013 by jerryking
Cirque, Sid Lee team up to create marketing ‘events’ - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 20 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER.

Cirque du Soleil is bringing its sense for spectacle to the marketing world, teaming up with Montreal ad agency Sid Lee to launch a branded entertainment company. The joint venture will aim to help brands create experiences that people actually want to watch, listen to, and experience. The joint venture, Sid Lee Entertainment, has been a year and a half in the making, and is an attempt to address a fundamental shift in advertising: away from pushing messages to consumers, and toward creating engaging content....Marketers have been approaching Cirque for years to develop entertainment projects, Mr. Lamarre said, but the company was unable to figure out how to do that without having it conflict with its own brand.

The goal is to create events engaging enough that the brands behind them can sell tickets, Mr. Cesvet said – and to potentially create a new economic model for an industry in flux.

“With advertising, we’re still selling hours,” he said. “What we want to do with this entertainment division is transform the revenue stream of our business … what clients expect from agencies is a lot more complex. You have to do an app, you have to do interactive experiences. I don’t think the value is recognized.”
marketing  branding  brands  Cirque_du_Soleil  Montreal  advertising_agencies  partnerships  joint_ventures  events  event_marketing  ideaCity  product_launches  customer_experience  experiential_marketing  content_creators  live_performances  interactivity  inbound_marketing  entertainment  Sid_Lee  Susan_Krashinsky  creating_valuable_content  fascination 
june 2013 by jerryking
How Not to Be the Office Tech Dinosaur - WSJ.com
April 16, 2013 | WSJ | By SUE SHELLENBARGER

Don't Be the Office Tech Dinosaur
As Younger Colleagues Speak Fluent Twitter, How Old Pros Find Ways to Upgrade Their Skills, Fight Insecurity
aging  Managing_Your_Career  advertising_agencies  Sue_Shellenbarger 
april 2013 by jerryking
Building Buzz for Ellis Island -- and Shirts - WSJ.com
August 20, 2007 | WSJ | By STEPHANIE KANG and SUZANNE VRANICA.

Building Buzz for Ellis Island -- and Shirts
PVH's Arrow Launches Social-Networking Site Full of Immigrant Tales
apparel  social_media  social_networking  Facebook  mens'_clothing  advertising  advertising_agencies 
january 2013 by jerryking
Change or die: could adland be the new Detroit?
Feb 18, 2011|Campaign |Amelia Torode (head of strategy and innovation at VCCP and the chair of the IPA Strategy Group) and Tracey Follows ( head of planning at VCCP)...

As the world changed with the globalisation of markets, the transformative power of digital technologies and a shift in consumer demand, the automotive industry and the city of Detroit did not. At a fundamental level, nothing changed. Detroit failed to adapt, failed to evolve.

We have started to ask ourselves: is adland the new Detroit?

Data: find stories in numbers

It's time to reimagine our role. We're no longer solving problems but investigating mysteries; no longer taking a brief, rather taking on a case. Like a detective, we start with behaviour, looking for patterns and anomalies. We assume that what we're being told is not entirely the "truth" so search for information that is given from various perspectives and tend to believe our eyes more than our ears.

Imagine the implications for how we approach data. Seen through the lens of "mystery", we're not simply seeing data as a stream of numbers but as a snapshot of behaviour and an insight into human nature. What we do with data is the same thing we do when we sit on a park bench or at a pavement café - people-watching,albeit from desktops. It's human stories hidden within numbers, and it takes away the fear that surrounds "big data".
shifting_tastes  data-driven  data_journalism  Detroit  advertising_agencies  data  storytelling  massive_data_sets  adaptability  evolution  United_Kingdom  Publicis  managing_change  sense-making  insights  behaviours  patterns  anomalies  assumptions  automotive_industry  human_experience  curiosity  consumer_behavior 
december 2012 by jerryking
Two Canadian ad agencies become ‘one.’ - The Globe and Mail
Susan Krashinsky - MARKETING REPORTER

The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Jul. 16 201
Canada  Canadian  advertising_agencies  mergers_&_acquisitions  digital_media 
july 2012 by jerryking
Ten Laws Of The Modern World
04.19.05 | Forbes | Rich Karlgaard.

• Gilder's Law: Winner's Waste. The futurist George Gilder wrote about this a few years ago in a Forbes publication. The best business models, he said, waste the era's cheapest resources in order to conserve the era's most expensive resources. When steam became cheaper than horses, the smartest businesses used steam and spared horses. Today the cheapest resources are computer power and bandwidth. Both are getting cheaper by the year (at the pace of Moore's Law). Google (nasdaq: GOOG - news - people ) is a successful business because it wastes computer power--it has some 120,000 servers powering its search engine--while it conserves its dearest resource, people. Google has fewer than 3,500 employees, yet it generates $5 billion in (current run rate) sales.

• Ricardo's Law. The more transparent an economy becomes, the more David Ricardo's 19th-century law of comparative advantage rules the day. Then came the commercial Internet, the greatest window into comparative advantage ever invented. Which means if your firm's price-value proposition is lousy, too bad. The world knows.

• Wriston's Law. This is named after the late Walter Wriston, a giant of banking and finance. In his 1992 book, The Twilight of Sovereignty, Wriston predicted the rise of electronic networks and their chief effect. He said capital (meaning both money and ideas), when freed to travel at the speed of light, "will go where it is wanted, stay where it is well-treated...." By applying Wriston's Law of capital and talent flow, you can predict the fortunes of countries and companies.

• The Laffer Curve. In the 1970s the young economist Arthur Laffer proposed a wild idea. Cut taxes at the margin, on income and capital, and you'll get more tax revenue, not less. Laffer reasoned that lower taxes would beckon risk capital out of hiding. Businesses and people would become more productive. The pie would grow. Application of the Laffer Curve is why the United States boomed in the 1980s and 1990s, why India is rocking now and why eastern Europe will outperform western Europe.

• Drucker's Law. Odd as it seems, you will achieve the greatest results in business and career if you drop the word "achievement" from your vocabulary. Replace it with "contribution," says the great management guru Peter Drucker. Contribution puts the focus where it should be--on your customers, employees and shareholders.

• Ogilvy's Law. David Ogilvy gets my vote as the greatest advertising mind of the 20th century. The founder of Ogilvy & Mather--now part of WPP (nasdaq: WPPGY - news - people )--left a rich legacy of ideas in his books, my favorite being Ogilvy on Advertising. Ogilvy wrote that whenever someone was appointed to head an office of O&M, he would give the manager a Russian nesting doll. These dolls open in the middle to reveal a smaller doll, which opens in the middle to reveal a yet smaller doll...and so on. Inside the smallest doll would be a note from Ogilvy. It read: "If each of us hires people who are smaller than we are, we shall become a company of dwarfs. But if each of us hires people who are bigger than we are, we shall become a company of giants." Ogilvy knew in the 1950s that people make or break businesses. It was true then; it's truer today.
Rich_Karlgaard  matryoshka_dolls  Moore's_Law  Metcalfe's_Law  Peter_Drucker  Ogilvy_&_Mather  Gilder's_Law  hiring  talent  advertising_agencies  transparency  value_propositions  capital_flows  talent_flows  David_Ogilvy  inexpensive  waste  abundance  scarcity  constraints  George_Gilder 
june 2012 by jerryking
Mike Sheehan of Hill Holliday, on Selfless Leadership - NYTimes.com
By ADAM BRYANT
Published: June 2, 2012

Q. Let’s talk about hiring. What are you looking for?

A. There are people who are smart, and they can assimilate their observations. But then there are people who can turn those observations into insight. There’s just a magic to it. I don’t know where it comes from, but I know it when I do it. I’m trying when I’m interviewing people to see if they have that kind of spark, if they have that kind of tenacity to push, to take what is orderly and then maybe put some incredible topspin on it.

I’ll ask people what they’ve done in the past that they’re most proud of. We’ll dig in deeply into important events in their life about their role and what they felt afterward. You get a sense of who’s real and who’s maybe academically perfect but just may not have that topspin that you need. You want to populate the agency with people who can put a lot of topspin on the ball.
advertising  advertising_agencies  leadership  hiring  selflessness 
june 2012 by jerryking
Grateful Student Returns the Favor - New York Times
By ROBERT JOHNSON
Published: August 7, 2005

Peter A. Georgescu whose "The Source of Success" (Jossey-Bass, $27.95) is being published this month, retired as chairman and chief executive of Young & Rubicam in 2000. The book aims to explain what Mr. Georgescu views as the two major challenges facing America: economic competition from the emerging economies of China and India and a need to foster more creativity within American companies.

"The only way this nation can compete with those that produce high-quality products at a lower price is by generating ideas that build a special relationship with consumers," he said. "Everyone has buildings and technology; those are commodities. The only leverageable asset in the future will be creativity."

===============================
See also Daniel Pink's work on countries cultivating skills and knowledge that are not available at a cheaper price in other countries or that cannot be rendered useless by
machines. That is, embracing play and abundance.

============================================
See also Tom Friedman's piece ("We Need a Second Party" - NYTimes.com ) below:

The first is responding to the challenges and opportunities of an era in which globalization and the information technology revolution have dramatically intensified, creating a hyperconnected world. This is a world in which education, innovation and talent will be rewarded more than ever. This is a world in which there will be no more “developed” and “developing countries,” but only HIEs (high-imagination-enabling countries) and LIEs (low-imagination-enabling countries). Adding "imagination"
advertising_agencies  book_reviews  Daniel_Pink  Young_&_Rubicam  CEOs  Tom_Friedman  creativity  competitiveness_of_nations  design  imagination  education  high-touch  innovation  talent  developed_countries  idea_generation  books  high-quality 
may 2012 by jerryking
In Ad Campaign, SAP Looks Beyond Business Customers - NYTimes.com
April 16, 2012, 12:14 am
In Ad Campaign, SAP Looks Beyond Business Customers
By TANZINA VEGA
SAP  WPP  Ogilvy_&_Mather  advertising_agencies  advertising 
april 2012 by jerryking
Charlotte Beers, on the Importance of Self-Assessment - NYTimes.com
March 31, 2012 | NYT | By ADAM BRYANT. This interview with Charlotte Beers was conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant. Ms. Beers, former chairwoman and C.E.O. of Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide, now runs seminars called “The X Factor” for women who are leaders.
Charlotte_Beers  women  self-assessment  CEOs  advertising_agencies  Ogilvy_&_Mather 
april 2012 by jerryking
From iconic to obscure: the push to save Canadian commercials - The Globe and Mail
susan krashinsky — MARKETING REPORTER
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 19, 2012
advertising  advertising_agencies  museums  Canadian 
january 2012 by jerryking
At Time Inc., a Leader to Help It Fit the New Digital Order - NYTimes.com
By DAVID CARR
December 4, 2011

Time Inc., the largest magazine publisher in the United States, would be run by Laura Lang, who was the chief executive of the digital advertising agency Digitas....Time Inc., the home of Olympian brands like Time, People and Fortune, will be run by an executive who would not know a print run from a can of green beans....it would have been unthinkable that a large consumer magazine group would be run by someone with plenty of experience buying ads for clients, but with no experience selling them. But Ms. Lang knows other things that could come in handy, including how to use multimedia and social media to increase reader engagement in a way magazines rarely achieve....What magazines have not been able to do is to provide reliable measures of effectiveness....It isn’t a reach to bet that Ms. Lang will help magazine publishers be a part of a media age built on metrics.
David_Carr  CEOs  women  TIME_Inc.  Time_Warner  digital_media  magazines  advertising_agencies  Publicis 
december 2011 by jerryking
In a Shift, Marketers Beef Up Ad Spending Inside Stores - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 21, 2005 | WSJ | By EMILY NELSON and SARAH
ELLISON....Some stores charge marketers a fee for in-store displays --
as if they were selling space on a roadside billboard. Others don't have
the clout or think they will be compensated through the overall boost
to sales. Those that charge face another wrinkle: there's no standard
system for measuring the audience for in-store ads and therefore no easy
way to charge for the space. The fees for each project are negotiated
on a case-by-case basis, a time-consuming task.

Ideas for Asif and LBMA as well as Turnstyle. Help stores monetize their 3rd party in-store advertising opportunities.
digital_signage  P&G  marketing  in-store  advertising_agencies  market_research  LBMA 
august 2011 by jerryking
Insights with Sir Martin Sorrell
Q3 · 2011 | Think Quarterly by Google | by Simon Rogers. For
Sorrell, that lack of control is symptomatic of the new world. “I’m in a
business where there’s complete anarchy. You can’t control it – you can
only react to it. The control traditionally held over the msg. is gone.
Look at Wikileaks: we approach everything we write on the basis it’s
going to be on the front pg. of the newspaper.”...His business
increasingly revolves around mobile comms. & what they can offer the
client. WPP encourages its established brands to invest in mobile
talent, and exhorting its online agencies to embrace mobile in a more
aggressive way...“Mobile is part of the online revolution,” he says. The
side effect of all this is that “our willingness to sit down and dig
deep and reflect is diminishing because so much info is coming at such a
pace – literally 24/7. He continues. “People used to say that info. is
power but that’s no longer the case. It’s analysis of the data, its use –
that's the power.
innovation  mobile  Martin_Sorrell  brands  interviews  WPP  advertising_agencies  data  analysis 
august 2011 by jerryking
WPP's Ogilvy & Mather to Launch China-Focused Division in U.S. - WSJ.com
APRIL 11, 2011 | WSJ | By LAURIE BURKITT. The new venture
places the agency amid a growing roster of law firms, investment banks
and consultancies that are building their staffs and creating new
services to cater to the government's initiative to build up Chinese
businesses abroad.
WPP  China  New_York_City  public_relations  advertising_agencies  FDI  China_rising  Ogilvy_&_Mather  product_launches 
april 2011 by jerryking
globeadvisor.com: Marketers target U.S. under MDC ownership
Wednesday, December 1, 2010
MDC to acquire Toronto-based Capital C Communications and direct-marketer Kenna

SIMON HOUPT
Simon_Houpt  MDC  Miles_Nadal  advertising_agencies 
april 2011 by jerryking
Asian Ad Agencies Add Americans to Help Build U.S. Business - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 9, 2010 | WSJ | By SUZANNE VRANICA. Asian Ad
Agencies Pick Locals for U.S. Needing an American on the Ground, Cheil
Worldwide of Korea Hires Former Wieden Executive Buz Sawyer for
Region....Bulking up in the U.S. is critical as both Cheil and Dentsu
have faced slow ad growth in their home markets. Ad spending in Japan
last year slipped 13% while Korea saw ad expenditures fall 11%,
according to ZenithOptimedia, a media buying owned by Publicis Groupe
SA.

"The U.S. represents one third of the global advertising market, adds
Mr. Kim. "We have to have a significant presence. Growth means
survival."
advertising_agencies  hiring  globalization  marketing  Asian 
december 2010 by jerryking
Agency Leadership Advice: Branding Strategy Insider
Shelly Lazarus, Chairman & CEO, Ogilvy & Mather
Worldwide. Excerpted from her January 2005 article The Best Advice I
Ever Got in the HBR. David Ogilvy 's advice, "No matter how much time
you spend thinking about, worrying about, focusing on, questioning the
value of, and evaluating people, it won’t be enough, he said. People are
the only thing that matters, and the only thing you should think about,
because when that part is right, everything else works."...."the truth
is that clients come and go: You’ll always win another one, and another
will go away. The real problem came when people within a company became
dispirited and demotivated, engulfed by crisis, felt differently about
the work they were doing, and were ready to walk away in a huff, wanting
nothing more to do with it. The challenge, therefore, is not simply to
win back a big account. It was to motivate the people to forget about
the catastrophe and focus on the work"
advice  advertising_agencies  advertising  bouncing_back  CEOs  David_Ogilvy  demotivated  dispirited  enterprise_clients  Managing_Your_Career  motivations  Ogilvy_&_Mather  people_skills  resilience  Shelly_Lazarus  walking_away  win_backs  women 
december 2010 by jerryking
Business: King of the Mad Men; Face value: Martin Sorrell
Nov 6, 2010 | The Economist. Vol. 397, Iss. 8707; pg. 81 |
Anonymous. In the long run, WPP seems to be well placed in many of the
world's fastest-growing economies, including Africa, where it has been
hired to rebrand Zain, a mobile-phone company. Only around one-third of
WPP's revenue now comes from the sort of work most people associate with
advertising; the rest is generated by a broader range of marketing
activities, such as consumer research, digital marketing, public
relations, and media planning and buying. It is a world away from the
1960s Madison Avenue advertising agency featured in "Mad Men", a hit
television drama. Sir Martin watches that too, and admits it shows that
some things remain the same in adland: "The egos, turf wars and
political incorrectness."
WPP  Martin_Sorrell  ProQuest  advertising_agencies  advertising  Mad_Men 
november 2010 by jerryking
China Web Ads Are New Frontier - WSJ.com
JULY 22, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | Emily Steel. Agencies'
New Frontier: China Web Ads. Publicis, Interpublic to Launch
Digital-Ad Buying Units in the Country, Hoping to Capitalize on a
Fast-Growing Market
Publicis  advertising_agencies  online_advertising  WPP  Martin_Sorrell  Baidu  Tencent  China 
august 2010 by jerryking
Local Search Heats Up
May 27, 2010 | BusinessWeek | By Nick Leiber. Google, Bing,
Yahoo, and a slew of startups boost their focus on small business.
Fewer than half of all U.S. small businesses have websites or advertise
on the Net, Nielsen Online reports...
Hundreds of new services have cropped up, aiming for a piece of the
$17.5 billion that consultancy BIA/Kelsey says U.S. small businesses
will spend on Net ads this year. By 2014, BIA estimates, that figure
will grow to $36.7 billion, a quarter of all local advertising. "There's
an increasing sense of urgency around having an effective online
marketing strategy," says Court Cunningham, CEO of online ad agency
Yodle, which caters to small businesses.
City_Voice  search  local_advertising  competition  small_business  advertising_agencies 
july 2010 by jerryking
A real Mad Man
July 16 2010 | Financial Times | By Katie Roiphe, who profiles
Jerry Della Femina, the inspiration behind Mad Men, Matthew Weiner’s
phenomenally successful show about the advertising world in New York in
the early 1960s. Della Femina wrote about those four-pack days in his
1970 cult-classic memoir of the advertising world, From Those Wonderful
Folks Who Gave You Pearl Harbor, which the creators of Mad Men based
their story on.
Mad_Men  trailblazers  advertising_agencies  '60s 
july 2010 by jerryking
Act Two: how Google is muscling its way into the advertising mainstream
January 19 2007 | Financial Times | By Richard Waters in San
Francisco. " ""My sense is, Google will have more luck in the
electronic world," says Rishad Tobacco-wala, chief innovation officer at
Publicis, the French communications group. "Their real future is
behavioural targeting on the web. For anything off the web, they don't
have an edge: it's just money.""
advertising  local_advertising  Google  behavioural_targeting  technology  search  small_business  City_Voice  trustworthiness  Publicis  advertising_agencies  Richard_Waters 
july 2010 by jerryking
How can I help you? Jim Stengel is head of marketing for Procter & Gamble, the world's biggest advertiser.
Feb 4, 2006 | Financial Times pg. 16 | GARY SILVERMAN. P&G
is trying to gain the attention of consumers through deeds - offering
advice, doing favours and displaying the kind of cultural empathy you
would expect of a charity or a religious organisation.
P&G  advertising  advertising_agencies  customer_focus  customer_centricity 
june 2010 by jerryking
Ad Agencies Hunt for Chief Creative Officers - WSJ.com
JUNE 3, 2010 WSJ by SUZANNE VRANICA . Help Wanted: Creative
Types. As the Recession Eases, Ad Agencies Scramble to Fill a Critical
Job at the Top
talent  advertising  advertising_agencies  creativity  executive_management  creative_types 
june 2010 by jerryking
Publicis Aims for Digital-Revenue Growth - WSJ.com
JUNE 1, 2010 | WSJ | By RUTH BENDER And MAX COLCHESTER.
Buoyed by a Digital Wave, After Buying Up Online-Ad Specialists,
Publicis CEO Seeks to Make Them Grow.
digital_media  advertising  advertising_agencies  WPP  Publicis 
june 2010 by jerryking
‘Design thinking’ strengthens brands
May. 20, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Rasha Mourtada. A
holistic approach is at the centre of design thinking, a philosophy that
refers to applying design principles to business. It encourages
business leaders to explore solutions by imagining what could be, rather
than what they know.

Mr. Perri partly credits design thinking with the success MHz has had
since its launch in 1993. What started as a traditional design agency
producing packaging and promotional material has morphed into a
strategic digital marketing firm. Along the way it has received
international awards for its innovative marketing techniques, and its
roster of clients includes such names as Rogers and Research In Motion.

Design thinking helped his firm adapt to new technology, says Mr. Perri,
and to work across multiple media, from print to television advertising
to social media.
Rasha_Mourtada  design  marketing  Rogers_Media  RIM  advertising  advertising_agencies 
may 2010 by jerryking
Marketers Pursue the Shallow-Pocketed - WSJ.com
Jan. 26, 2007 | WSJ | By ANTONIO REGALADO. Interpublic Group's
McCann World Group in 2005 polled 15 of its major advertising clients.
These clients saw their biggest mktg. opportunities as being people
with low incomes....In recent years, mktg. to the poor has become a hot
subject. Univ. of Michigan economist C.K. Prahalad helped popularize the
idea with his 2004 book "The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid,"
which argued big companies could profit and help the world's 4 billion
poor or low-income people by finding innovative ways to sell them soap
and refrigerators....Some companies have already been tackling
low-income mkts. by revamping distribution sys., or tweaking products so
that they are simpler or less expensive. E.g., Nestlé Brazil saw sales
of its Bono cookies jump 40% last year after it shrank the package to
140 g. from 200 g. and dropped the price... Illiteracy is one big
challenge...The strong role that community plays in poor neighborhoods
is of particular interest.
advertising_agencies  C.K._Prahalad  marketing  market_research  BRIC  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  low-income 
december 2009 by jerryking
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