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jerryking : advocacy   17

Informed Patient? Don’t Bet On It
MARCH 1, 2017 | The New York Times | By MIKKAEL A. SEKERES, M.D. and TIMOTHY D. GILLIGAN, M.D.

■ Ask us to use common words and terms. If your doctor says that you’ll end up with a “simple iliac ileal conduit” or a “urostomy,” feel free to say “I don’t understand those words. Can you explain what that means?”

■ Summarize back what you heard. “So I should split my birth control pills in half and take half myself and give the other half to my boyfriend?” That way, if you’ve misunderstood what we did a poor job of explaining, there will be a chance to straighten it out: “No, that’s not right. You should take the whole pill yourself.”

■ Request written materials, or even pictures or videos. We all learn in different ways and at different paces, and “hard copies” of information that you can take time to absorb at home may be more helpful than the few minutes in our offices.

■ Ask for best-case, worst-case, and most likely scenarios, along with the chance of each one occurring.

■ Ask if you can talk to someone who has undergone the surgery, or received the chemotherapy. That person will have a different kind of understanding of what the experience was like than we do.

■ Explore alternative treatment options, along with the advantages and disadvantages of each. “If I saw 10 different experts in my condition, how many would recommend the same treatment you are recommending?”
■ Take notes, and bring someone else to your appointments to be your advocate, ask the questions you may be reluctant to, and be your “accessory brain,” to help process the information we are trying to convey.
Communicating_&_Connecting  clarity  doctor's_visits  questions  mens'_health  learning_journeys  medical  probabilities  plain_English  referrals  note_taking  appointments  advocacy  worst-case  best-case  medical_communication 
march 2017 by jerryking
One Firm Getting What It Wants in Washington: BlackRock - WSJ
By RYAN TRACY and SARAH KROUSE
Updated April 20, 2016

The Problem: BlackRock believed that the U.S. Federal Reserve was leaning towards designating it as a source of financial system risk, like other big banks, and as such, be “too big to fail”.

What Was At Stake: the designation “systemically important” would draw BlackRock in for greater oversight by the Federal Reserve which would mean tougher rules and potentially higher capital requirements from U.S. regulators.

The Solution: BlackRock didn't take any chances. The company began spending heavily on lobbying and engaging policymakers. Executives at the firm began preparing for greater federal scrutiny of their business in the months following the 2008 financial crisis. BlackRock aggressively prepared a counter-narrative upon discovered a Treasury Department’s Office of Financial Research report that asset-management firms and the funds they run were “vulnerable to shocks” and may engage in “herding” behavior that could amplify a shock to the financial system. The response took the form of a 40-plus-page paper rebutting the report. The firm suggested that instead of focusing on the size of a manager or fund, regulators should look at what specific practices, such as the use of leverage, might be the source of risks. While other money managers such as Fidelity and Vanguard sought to evade being labeled systemically important, BlackRock’s strategy stood out.
BlackRock  crony_capitalism  Washington_D.C.  risks  lobbying  too_big_to_fail  asset_management  advocacy  government_relations  influence  political_advocacy  policy  U.S._Federal_Reserve  systemic_risks  Communicating_&_Connecting  U.S.Treasury_Department  counternarratives  oversight  financial_system  leverage  debt  creating_valuable_content  think_differently  policymakers  policymaking 
april 2016 by jerryking
Uber’s advocacy strategy, scrappy lobbying and rapid growth - The Globe and Mail
SIMON DOYLE
Uber’s advocacy strategy, scrappy lobbying and rapid growth
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
OTTAWA — Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jul. 20, 2015
Uber  ride_sharing  sharing_economy  lobbying  lobbyists  Toronto  advocacy 
july 2015 by jerryking
Wiring the Vast Left-Wing Conspiracy - New York Times
By Matt Bai
Published: July 25, 2004 (look at Preston Manning links)

The presentation itself, a collection of about 40 slides titled ''The Conservative Message Machine's Money Matrix,'' essentially makes the case that a handful of families -- Scaife, Bradley, Olin, Coors and others -- laid the foundation for a $300 million network of policy centers, advocacy groups and media outlets that now wield great influence over the national agenda. The network, as Stein diagrams it, includes scores of powerful organizations -- most of them with bland names like the State Policy Network and the Leadership Institute -- that he says train young leaders and lawmakers and promote policy ideas on the national and local level. These groups are, in turn, linked to a massive message apparatus, into which Stein lumps everything from Fox News and the Wall Street Journal op-ed page to Pat Robertson's ''700 Club.'' And all of this, he contends, is underwritten by some 200 ''anchor donors.'' ''This is perhaps the most potent, independent institutionalized apparatus ever assembled in a democracy to promote one belief system,'' he said.
advocacy  belief_systems  conservatism  Democrats  discipline  donors  Fox_News  George_Soros  GOP  grass-roots  high_net_worth  ideas  ideologies  institutions  left-wing  Matt_Bai  messaging  moguls  political_infrastructure  politicians  right-wing  social_movements  think_tanks  training_programs 
may 2012 by jerryking
Why We Need Free Public Libraries More Than Ever
July 29, 2011 | The Atlantic | Keith Michael Fiels, the executive director of the American Library Association.
libraries  advocacy  reading  economy  community  democracy 
july 2011 by jerryking
What is Scarce in Advocacy and Campaigns?
August 28, 2007 | NetCentric Advocacy | Ways for Campaigns
to be unique and offer something scarce... (things you have that others
don't in a mass marketing world)...

1. Real stories.
2. Genuine passion.
3. A base of real people that care about the issue.
4. Staff that have insights on the science, politics, policies and
dynamics at play that keep an issue form being solved.
5. The ability to convene people that care.
6. Clarity and purpose in a world of shallow consumerism
7. No need to make money while solving a problem ( can do things that
solve problems and loose money by design)
8. you have fun working on an issue most people would burn out on.
9. maybe truth and science to support your claims.
10. faith and confidence in your work.
advocacy  authenticity  campaigns  cause_marketing  passions  public_relations  scarcity  shallowness  storytelling 
october 2010 by jerryking
Tip Sheet: Advocacy Advertising: More Than Slightly Alive
Sep 22, 2008.! PR News. ! Anonymous. Cost-conscious clients
make the fatal error of thinking earned media is a better route because
it is free media, as opposed to advertising (paid media). The most
ambitious earned media campaign can be more expensive and less effective
as a well-thought-out ad campaign. No longer can a clients measure the
success of an advocacy campaign solely by the # of news hits. Because
clients love metrics, they are drawn to many of the newer online tactics
that crank out multiple reports about how their msg. fared on the Web.
But before anyone writes the obituary on print publications, they may
want to consider that lawmakers, especially on Capitol Hill, continue to
rely on must-read publications, including The Hill, The Politico,
National Journal and The Weekly Standard. An October 2007 Nielsen
study, "Trust in Advertising," noted that ads in newspapers ranked
second worldwide among all media categories.
ProQuest  advertising  advocacy  metrics  newspapers  cause_marketing  campaigns  effectiveness 
october 2010 by jerryking
Finding an Advocate - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 28, 2008 | Wall Street Journal | by MELINDA BECK.

"If we could make only one change in health care, it should be to change
the notion that families are visitors. Families are allies and partners
for safety and quality," says Beverly Johnson, president of the
nonprofit Institute for Family-Centered Care, which is leading a
movement to involve families more.
advocacy  health  healthcare  family 
may 2009 by jerryking

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