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Study finds link between dementia and lack of sleep - The Globe and Mail
WENCY LEUNGHEALTH REPORTER
PUBLISHED 52 MINUTES AGO

The researchers’ findings, published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances, indicate disrupted sleep may contribute to changes in a type of immune cells in the brain called microglia, which in turn, appear to be related to poorer cognitive functions, such as memory and the ability to reason.

While further research is needed to determine whether fixing people’s sleep problems can prevent or reverse cognitive decline, Andrew Lim, one of the authors of the study, said fragmented sleep should not be ignored.

Many people believe “having bad sleep is just part of aging, and it’s something that’s annoying but to be tolerated, rather than aggressively managed or aggressively investigated,” said Dr. Lim, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Toronto and sleep neurologist at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. “This adds one more reason to take sleep problem seriously and to look for your treatable causes and to address them.”

This study builds on previous research, including studies on rodents and genetic studies, that suggest microglia play a role in the link between poor sleep and cognitive impairment and dementia. Microglia normally help fight infections and clear debris from the brain. But dysfunction of microglia appears to be involved in the development of Alzheimer’s disease, Dr. Lim said.
aging  Alzheimer’s_disease  dementia  sleep  sleeplessness 
10 weeks ago by jerryking
25 Again? How Exercise May Fight Aging
The muscles of those who worked out looked like those of 25-year-olds and showed less of the inflammation that is tied to health problems as we age.
aging  exercise  inflammation  strength_training 
11 weeks ago by jerryking
As I enter middle age, these are the fitness lessons I wish I could teach my younger self
October 6, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by PAUL LANDINI.

Mistakes have been made. Efforts were wasted. Time was lost. If I could mentor my 20-year-old self, the first thing I would do is collect all of the tattered fitness and lifestyle magazines that would soon lead me astray and throw them all in the trash where they belong. Then, I would sit myself down and impart the following hard-earned knowledge.

* IT’S SUPPOSED TO BE FUN
Remember recess? Remember how much fun it was to be set loose upon the schoolyard after enduring hours of enforced sitting? ...Playground games such as double dutch, red rover and tag always appealed to me more than traditional sports, but as we age, society tells us to stop playing games, to get serious, to respect and follow the rules. The grown-up rules of physical fitness emphasize pain, suffering and drudgery over pleasure, joy and leisure. Exercise becomes a form of corporal punishment for simply existing; you can’t indulge in any of life’s rewards without having to pay the price on the treadmill the next day........The point here is that there is great happiness to be had in being active, you just have to find the right outlet. Powerlifting, CrossFit, kettlebell sport, parkour, gymnastics, cycling, swimming, dancing, walking, running, rowing, climbing – each of these activities has merit, each can deliver “results.” If your current workout is leaving you bored and listless, try something new. A whole world of movement possibilities awaits.

* START WITH STABILITY
Just like solving an algebra problem or landing a 747, the principles of getting in shape are governed by a specific order of operations. However, unlike the laws of mathematics and aerodynamics, the consequences for ignoring the rules of fitness aren’t as dire. The worst thing that will happen, outside of actually injuring yourself, is a complete lack of progress in reaching any of your goals.

There are variations on these steps, catchy turns of phrase that certain coaches will use to enhance their industry brand, but the gist is the same – first you enhance stability, then you build strength, then you apply that strength to some form of fast, explosive movement. The logic of this continuum is evident – you can’t be fast without being strong, and you can’t be strong without first building a stable foundation. [JCK Stability, Strength, Power] Of course, all of this was beyond me when I first started lifting, which is why I didn’t progress for a long time.

The fitness industry sells itself by using exciting images of muscular people doing cool things – Kettlebell swings! Box jumps! Deadlifts! – the implicit message being: This could be you......know planks and push-ups are boring, but you must master your body first. Then, and only then, are you ready to increase resistance.

* YOU DON’T NEED BARBELLS
This is a corollary to the last two points, if not a summary of my fitness philosophy in general. Barbells are designed to support significant weight – hundreds upon hundreds of pounds – and in that respect, they do their job very well. Now, what about you. What are you wired to do?

If your answer is “move as much weight as humanly possible,” then stick with barbell training. It will serve you well for a time, as long as your technique and programming are sound, but eventually your body will break.......For everyone else, it’s time to think outside of the squat rack. If you’re walking into your workouts with anything less than a semi-reluctant enthusiasm, freeing yourself from the confines of barbells and benches can have a dramatic impact on your mindset. Think push-ups over bench press, pull-ups over pull-downs, sled pushes over squats. Actually, everyone should squat, you just don’t need to sling a barbell on your back to do so.
aging  CrossFit  exercise  fitness  lessons_learned  midlife  play  pull-ups  push-ups  squats  stability  strength_training 
october 2019 by jerryking
Opinion: Jimmy Carter at 95: No figs left to give
September 27, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by ELIZABETH RENZETTI.
'70s  aging  Elizabeth_Renzetti  Jimmy_Carter 
september 2019 by jerryking
8 Muscle Gaining Mistakes - Men Over 40 (FIXED!!) - YouTube
(1) Start with the Warm-up, get body ready to train. Get your heart rate up. Break a sweat.
(2) Focus on building strength. Do so responsibly. Controlled strength is the focus. Commend the weight that you use. Pause reps for bench press and squats. Progressively overloading.
(3) Train the mind-muscle connection. Pursuit of the quality of each repetition. Introduction of joint stability and muscular control.. Now feed more into controlled strength.
(4) How to string quality reps into quality sets and a quality workout? Introduce metabolic training. Lighter weights on exercises and going for the burn (metabolic stress). Get THROUGH the burn.
(5) Train like an athlete. Be scientific, be purposeful. Doing athletic things. E.g. Jumping. Don't be one dimensional.
(6) Boring corrective exercises. Face-pulls.
(7) What type of cardio? Do sparing cardio. Battle ropes, sled push, Farmers carry,
(8) Nutrition and supplementation. Our metabolism changes. Reliance on consistent, high quality nutrition. Be on point with your nutrition. Focus on increasing consistency of diet.
aging  AthleanX  cardiovascular  diets  metabolism  midlife  mistakes  nutrition  power_of_the_pause  strength_training 
september 2019 by jerryking
Opinion: My declining years – and yours
JULY 5, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by MARGARET WENTE

According to the experts, certain parts of my brain responsible for cognitive function are literally shrinking. My brain’s blood flow is slowing down, just like the rest of me. The inescapable result is lapses in the synapses. I’ve always thought that the worst threat to my vanity was advancing wrinkles. But now I know it’s cognitive slippage.

Perhaps it’s some consolation that my friends are getting dotty, too. Sure, they’re working gamely to keep their brains in tip-top shape. They do word puzzles, or try to learn a language. They take supplements and eat more leafy greens. Good luck to them. So far, nobody has figured out how to turn back the neurological clock.

The more I learn about brain aging, the more obvious it is that the kids really are smarter than we are. “The data are shockingly clear that for most people, in most fields, professional decline starts earlier than almost anyone thinks,” writes Arthur Brooks (no cognitive slouch himself) in a new essay for The Atlantic. He found that most of us reach our mental peak around 20 years after the start of our careers. We do our best work in our 40s and 50s and it’s all downhill from there.

People in different types of work peak at different ages, just as athletes do. Those who rely heavily on fluid intelligence – the ability to reason, think fast and solve problems in unique and novel situations – peak much younger than average. Mr. Brooks says his line of work is a good example. (He has just retired as the head of a well-known U.S. think tank.) “The most profound insights tend to come from those in their 30s and early 40s.”

Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, chess grand masters and nuclear physicists are even more precocious – which means they burn out early. By the time they hit their 30s they’re already in creative decline. By contrast, lawyers, judges and professors draw more on what’s called crystallized intelligence – a stock of knowledge built up over time.They can coast on that knowledge well into their 60s. For most of us, however, cognitive decline begins in middle age.
aging  Arthur_Brooks  cognitive_skills  decline  elderly  elder_wisdom  journalism  Margaret_Wente  mental_dexterity  precociousness  retirement 
july 2019 by jerryking
Deadly Falls in Older Americans Are Rising. Here’s How to Prevent Them. - The New York Times
By Katie Hafner
June 4, 2019

for people over 75, the rate of mortality from falls more than doubled from 2000 to 2016.....The most likely reason is that people are living longer with conditions that in the past they might have died from,” she said. In addition, she continued, older adults are on medications that increase their risk of falling. Women are slightly more likely to fall than men, but men are slightly more likely to die as a result of a fall......“The take-home message is that falls kill,”....
Although the trend is disturbing, falls needn’t be an inevitable part of aging, and they are preventable.......The biggest risk factor for falls that can’t be changed is your age,” said Dr. Elizabeth Eckstrom, a geriatrician at Oregon Health & Science University. “Most of the other risks can be mitigated.”

(1) Exercise!
incorporating exercise into a daily routine....at least 20 minutes a day, combining aerobic and anaerobic exercise. Weight lifting, particularly for strengthening the legs, is a good idea....Tai chi, the Chinese martial art, appears to be an effective way to improve balance. It involves very slow, purposeful movements in coordination with breathing and muscle activity.
(2) Mind your meds
Medications, especially those that help with sleep, can compromise balance. ....benzodiazepines such as Valium and Xanax are especially bad.....“Metabolism slows in older adults, so toxicity to benzos builds up, which can cause dizziness,”.....The same goes for non-benzodiazepines such as Ambien. Sedating antihistamines such as Benadryl and Advil PM are also bad for balance.
(3) Re-accessorize
Eyesight is a crucial component when it comes to falls. Avoid bifocal or progressive lenses when walking outside. “If you’re wearing bifocals and stepping down off a curb, that changes your depth perception,”.......use a single-focus lens for walking outside....Then there’s footwear. Fashion needs to take a back seat to function. “No high heels,”....Anything the foot slides into is a terrible idea, she said: “Avoid cute slide-in sandals.” All shoes should have a back, and a sole with good tread. Slippers, too, can be bad. “Slippers make you slip,”.....Are you too proud to use a cane or walker? Get over it.
(4) Eliminate tripping hazards.
The accumulated clutter of a lifetime can be lethal. Get rid of small scatter rugs in your home, and eliminate extension cords that stretch across a floor.
(5) Early and often to the bathroom.
Hydration is a good way to fight dizziness. Drink plenty of water throughout the day,
aging  footwear  geriatrics  hydration  prevention  quality_of_life  risk_factors  strength_training 
june 2019 by jerryking
Night time urination could mean your blood pressure's up
Posted: Apr 01, 2019 | CBC Radio | Dr. Brian Goldman · CBC Radio ·
aging  blood_pressure  diets  mens'_health  nocturnal  salt  sleep  urination 
april 2019 by jerryking
Is Aerobic Exercise the Key to Successful Aging?
Dec. 12, 2018 | - The New York Times | By Gretchen Reynolds.

Aerobic activities like jogging and interval training can make our cells biologically younger, according to a noteworthy new experiment. Weight training may not have the same effect, the study found, raising interesting questions about how various types of exercise affect us at a microscopic level and whether the differences should perhaps influence how we choose to move.
aerobic  aging  benefits  exercise  fitness  health  interval_training  strength_training 
december 2018 by jerryking
Silicon Valley Myths Aside, Time Is on the Side of Aging Entrepreneurs - CIO Journal. - WSJ
By Irving Wladawsky-Berger
Aug 31, 2018

Are young entrepreneurs more likely to produce high-growth firms? Can middle-age founders in their 40s be successful?

Age and High-Growth Entrepreneurship, — a recent working paper by economists Pierre Azoulay, Benjamin Jones, J. Daniel Kim and Javier Miranda — aimed to answer these questions.
aging  ageism  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  high-growth  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger  midlife  myths  Silicon_Valley  founders 
september 2018 by jerryking
The midlife crisis — and how to deal with it | Financial Times
Emma Jacobs JULY 13, 2018

The Happiness Curve: Why Life Gets Better After Midlife, by Jonathan Rauch, Bloomsbury Publishing, RRP£18.99, 256 pages

There Are No Grown-Ups: A Midlife Coming-of-Age Story, by Pamela Druckerman, Doubleday, RRP£14.99, 288 pages

No One Tells You This: A Memoir, by Glynnis MacNicol, Simon & Schuster, RRP$26, 304 pages
books  book_reviews  mortality  aging  midlife  parenting 
july 2018 by jerryking
Opinion | How to Survive Your 40s - The New York Times
By Pamela Druckerman

Ms. Druckerman is a writer in her 40s, living in Paris.

May 4, 2018
aging  grace  howto  midlife  women 
may 2018 by jerryking
Adopt 5 Healthy Habits, Live 12 to 14 Years Longer -
MAY 1, 2018 The New York Times By NICHOLAS BAKALAR.

The study, in Circulation, looked at five behaviors: eating a healthy diet, not smoking, getting regular physical activity, moderate alcohol consumption and maintaining a normal weight.

The scientists calculated that, on average, a 50-year-old man who adopted all of these would live 12 years longer than a man who took on none.
aging  habits  healthy_lifestyles  longevity  mens'_health 
may 2018 by jerryking
The Common Advice for Those With Thinning Bones Could Be All Wrong - WSJ
Bone building happens specifically at the areas of the bone you stress during your workout, says Pamela S. Hinton, associate professor of nutrition and exercise physiology, at the University of Missouri, in Columbia.

For this reason, a dead lift is one of the best exercises because it “uses big muscles around the hips and hamstrings,” causing the muscle to pull on the bone. It also recruits the muscles around the lumbar and thoracic spine to stabilize the body during the lift, says Polly de Mille, exercise physiologist at the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York. Proper form is critical to safety, she adds.
aging  longevity  strength_training  intensity  fitness  exercise  high-intensity  trauma  overcompensation  deadlifts  osteoporosis  bone_density  high-impact 
april 2018 by jerryking
Single? No Kids? Don’t Fret: How to Plan Care in Your Later Years - The New York Times
“People who are aging alone need to make plans when they are independent and functional,” she said. “They need to learn about the resources in the community and the appropriate time to start using them.” Those services could include senior-friendly housing and the growing number of home-delivered products and services aimed at the aging-solo market, such as healthy meals and doctors who make house calls,
solo  childless  aging  retirement  howto  preparation  longevity 
april 2018 by jerryking
Why can’t we all be as productive as Picasso?
MARCH 28, 2018 | FT | Jo Ellison.

The year 1932 was a landmark moment for Picasso both personally and professionally. Having recently turned 50, the artist found himself feverishly experimenting with new styles and subjects as he reflected on his own contemporaneity and relevance. It was the year his marriage to Olga broke down, and the year in which a group of Paris dealers would mount his first ever retrospective.

Picasso’s “year of wonders” is obviously a cause for celebration — even if only for his astonishing output.
......As the New Yorker writer and critic Malcolm Gladwell so deftly pointed out in his 2008 book, Outliers, those who are blessed with the talent of a genius only become so after 10,000 hours of practice: the “magic number of greatness”. Debate has raged ever since as to the precise number at which the merely good become gifted, but Gladwell’s theory has always held a beguiling allure. If only I weren’t so appallingly lazy, I too might write a bestselling novel, or win a gold medal for figure skating, or fulfil my life-long dream of becoming a lead soprano in a West End musical. It’s always served as a peculiar comfort to know that the only obstacle to my success has been feckless indolence — and possibly the invention of the iPhone.

Which is why the Picasso exhibition was so grim. It wasn’t so much that he worked extremely hard to become the world’s most famous artist. Anyone could, technically, slave away in a studio for hours crafting their genius. It’s that he still found time to finesse such a gloriously well-rounded and fulsome life in the spaces he found in between.
Pablo_Picasso  Malcolm_Gladwell  artists  reflections  aging  genius  prolificacy  productivity  midlife  well-rounded  interstitial  personal_accomplishments  10000_hours 
april 2018 by jerryking
Nabokov, Ozil and the uses of insomnia
FEBRUARY 9, 2018 | FT | Janan Ganesh.

Why We Sleep, by Matthew Walker, a professor of neuroscience and psychology at the University of California, Berkeley.

The plain title belies a harrowing study of sleeplessness, which Walker persuasively links to cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, mental health problems and immune deficiencies....Doctors have agreed for some time on the physical penalties of inadequate sleep, a threshold they set at seven hours or less per night.....Apparently, whether you are a “morning lark” or a “night owl” is to a large extent a genetic given. Camomile tea and eye masks can only do so much against hard-wired circadian rhythms. It gives you a sense of the book’s bleakness that this counts as one of its consolations.....In dystopic fiction, the future is all resource wars and extreme climates. A more bland but equally plausible dread is what Walker calls an “epidemic” of sleeplessness, with humans paradoxically locked into a trance of exhaustion even as technology makes their physical burdens easier and ever easier.
aging  books  circadian_rhythms  exhaustion  Janan_Ganesh  mens'_health  sleep  sleeplessness 
february 2018 by jerryking
Lift Weights, Eat More Protein, Especially if You’re Over 40 - The New York Times
By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS FEB. 7, 2018

To answer the simplest question of whether taking in more protein during weight training led to larger increases in muscle size and strength, the researchers added all of the results together....And the answer was a resounding yes. Men and women who ate more protein while weight training did develop larger, stronger muscles than those who did not.
strength_training  fitness  exercise  aging  midlife  diets  proteins 
february 2018 by jerryking
Singapore experiments with smart government
January 22, 2018 | FT | by John Thornhill.

Singapore has a reputation as a free-trading entrepôt, beloved of buccaneering Brexiters. ....But stiff new challenges confront Singapore, just as they do all other countries, in the face of the latest technological upheavals. Is the smart nation, as it likes to style itself, smart enough to engineer another reboot?.....Singapore is becoming a prime test bed for how developed nations can best manage the potentially disruptive forces unleashed by powerful new technologies, such as advanced robotics and artificial intelligence...Naturally, Singapore’s technocratic government is well aware of those challenges and is already rethinking policy and practice. True to its heritage, it is pursuing a hybrid approach, mixing free market principles and state activism.

Rather than passively reacting to the technological challenges, the island state is actively embracing them....“The real skill of Singapore has been to reverse engineer the needs of industry and to supply them in a much more cost-effective way than simply writing a cheque,” says Rob Bier, managing partner of Trellis Asia, which advises high-growth start-ups...To take one example, the country has become an enthusiastic promoter of autonomous vehicles. The government has created one of the most permissive regulatory regimes in the world to test driverless cars.....GovTech’s aim is to help offer seamless, convenient public services for all users, creating a truly digital society, economy and government. To that end, the government is acting as a public sector platform, creating a secure and accessible open-data infrastructure for its citizens and companies. For example, with users’ permission, Singapore’s national identity database can be accessed by eight commercial banks to verify customers with minimal fuss. A public health service app now allows parents to keep check of their children’s vaccinations.

By running with the technological wolves, Singapore is clearly hoping to tame the pack.
Singapore  autonomous_vehicles  dislocations  traffic_congestion  aging  smart_government  disruption  robotics  automation  artificial_intelligence  test_beds  reboot  city_states  experimentation  forward-thinking  open-data  privacy  reverse_engineering 
january 2018 by jerryking
No Excuses, People: Get the New Shingles Vaccine - The New York Times
Paula Span
THE NEW OLD AGE NOV. 10, 2017
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aging  mens'_health  vaccines  immune_system  immunization  shingles 
november 2017 by jerryking
The Older You Are, the Worse You Sleep
Oct. 13, 2017 | WSJ | By Dr. Matthew Walker, director of the Center for Human Sleep Science at the University of California, Berkeley, and author of a new book, “Why We Sleep” (Scribner)

As we age, bodily changes degrade the quantity and quality of our sleep—which affects our health more than we realize....Sleep gets more difficult the older you get. Older adults are less able, on average, to obtain as much sleep, or as restorative a sleep, as young adults. The problem gets so bad that by our 80s, the lack of sleep can have major health ramifications, though we don’t always notice.

Older adults face a number of challenges. The first is a reduction in the quantity and quality of deep sleep—the stage that beneficially overhauls your cardiovascular, immune and metabolic systems and refreshes learning and memory abilities. As you enter your 30s and 40s, your deep-sleep brain waves become smaller, less powerful and fewer in number. Reductions in deep-sleep quality increase your risk of heart attacks, obesity and stroke, as well as the buildup of a toxic brain protein—called beta amyloid—that is linked​to Alzheimer’s disease.

Passing into your mid- to late-40s, age will have stripped you of 60% to 70% of the deep sleep you were enjoying as a teen. By the time you reach age 70, you will have lost 80% to 90% of your youthful, restorative deep sleep....The second hallmark of altered sleep as we age is fragmentation. The older we get, the more frequently we wake up throughout the night. Causes include body pain and a weakened bladder. Reducing fluid intake in the evening can help the latter, but it isn’t a cure-all.

Because of sleep fragmentation, older people will suffer a reduction in sleep efficiency, defined as the percent of time you were asleep while in bed.The third sleep change with advanced age is that of circadian timing—the body’s internal clock that times our sleep-wake rhythms. Seniors commonly experience a regression in circadian timing, leading to earlier bedtimes. The cause is an early release and peak of melatonin in older adults in the evening, instructing an earlier start time for sleep, in part because of an early drop in core body temperature.
aging  Alzheimer’s_disease  books  cardiovascular  circadian_rhythms  health_risks  heart_attacks  immune_system  melatonin  mens'_health  metabolic_rate  sleep 
october 2017 by jerryking
When Did You First Feel Old? - WSJ
By Clare Ansberry
Oct. 2, 2017

It can hit us at any age; just feeling young at key turning points helps us live longer and happier lives

Awareness of age isn’t necessarily a bad thing.....Appreciating that time isn’t endless
helps set priorities.
===========
Aging is social, we old people have to help young people understand the process.
aging  grace  culture  turning_points  longevity  happiness 
october 2017 by jerryking
The Best Exercise for Aging Muscles
MARCH 23, 2017 | The New York Times | By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS.

There were some unsurprising differences: The gains in muscle mass and strength were greater for those who exercised only with weights, while interval training had the strongest influence on endurance.

But more unexpected results were found in the biopsied muscle cells. Among the younger subjects who went through interval training, the activity levels had changed in 274 genes, compared with 170 genes for those who exercised more moderately and 74 for the weight lifters. Among the older cohort, almost 400 genes were working differently now, compared with 33 for the weight lifters and only 19 for the moderate exercisers.

Many of these affected genes, especially in the cells of the interval trainers, are believed to influence the ability of mitochondria to produce energy for muscle cells; the subjects who did the interval workouts showed increases in the number and health of their mitochondria — an impact that was particularly pronounced among the older cyclists.

It seems as if the decline in the cellular health of muscles associated with aging was “corrected” with exercise, especially if it was intense,
aging  endurance  exercise  fitness  high-impact  interval_training  strength_training 
april 2017 by jerryking
To Be a Genius, Think Like a 94-Year-Old - The New York Times
Pagan Kennedy APRIL 7, 2017

Pagan Kennedy is the author of “Inventology: How We Dream Up Things That Change the World”

it’s easy for us middle-aged folk to believe that the great imaginative leaps are behind us, and that innovation belongs to the kids.

On the contrary, there’s plenty of evidence to suggest that late blooming is no anomaly. A 2016 Information Technology and Innovation Foundation study found that inventors peak in their late 40s and tend to be highly productive in the last half of their careers. Similarly, professors at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Hitotsubashi University in Japan, who studied data about patent holders, found that, in the United States, the average inventor sends in his or her application to the patent office at age 47, and that the highest-value patents often come from the oldest inventors — those over the age of 55.....The more I talked to Dr. Goodenough, the more I wondered if his brilliance was directly tied to his age. After all, he has been thinking about energy problems longer than just about anyone else on the planet.....“I’m old enough to know you can’t close your mind to new ideas. You have to test out every possibility if you want something new.”

When I asked him about his late-life success, he said: “Some of us are turtles; we crawl and struggle along, and we haven’t maybe figured it out by the time we’re 30. But the turtles have to keep on walking.” This crawl through life can be advantageous, he pointed out, particularly if you meander around through different fields, picking up clues as you go along. .... The tapestry reminds him of the divine power that fuels his mind. “I’m grateful for the doors that have been opened to me in different periods of my life,” he said. He believes the glass battery was just another example of the happy accidents that have come his way: “At just the right moment, when I was looking for something, it walked in the door.”
physics  batteries  energy  creativity  biases  patents  midlife  genius  aging  late_bloomers 
april 2017 by jerryking
Is it harder to lose weight when you’re older? - The Globe and Mail
KAREN WEINTRAUB
The New York Times News Service
Published Wednesday, Apr. 05, 2017
aging  weight_loss 
april 2017 by jerryking
Twilight of the Rock Gods -
March 25, 2017 | WSJ | By Neil Shah.

As rock ‘n’ roll loses its founding megastars—and sales juggernauts—the music industry faces pressure to revamp.....As rock's founding fathers and mothers get older, the music industry faces a problem: can younger artists replace their sales?

Of the 25 artists with the highest record sales in the U.S. since 1991, when reliable data first became available, just one—Britney Spears—is under 40, Nielsen data show. Nineteen of the 25 are over 50 years old.....In terms of concert-tour revenue, artists over 50 represent half of the $4.5 billion generated by last year’s top 100-grossing tours, excluding non-music acts and comedians, according to a WSJ analysis of data from Pollstar, the trade magazine. Of the top 10, five were over 50, including Bruce Springsteen (67), Guns N’ Roses (average age 53), Paul McCartney (74), Garth Brooks (55) and the Rolling Stones (73), Pollstar data show.......the number of celebrity deaths last year wasn’t exceptional, according to a study by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, though the number of “mega famous” celebrity deaths was. Because of their penchant for hard living, rocker deaths are likely to stay consistently high. .....Rock has an outsize influence on music sales. It was responsible for 41% of total U.S. album sales last year, far higher than hip-hop and R&B (15%), country (13%) or pop (10%), according to Nielsen......Much of rock’s commercial success was possible because of the way the industry was structured. By the 1980s, cash-rich major labels were helping finance tours, throwing money at fledgling acts and investing huge sums in veteran stars even when their careers floundered.

Such investments—equivalent in spirit to the R&D expenditures of pharmaceutical firms—helped artists build enduring brands and transformed superstars into major corporations that overshadow young pop/rock acts even today.......WILL YOUNGER STARS FILL THE VOID?

Probably not. Because of the multiplicity of entertainment options today, reduced attention spans, personalized tastes and less record-label support, most of today’s artists will never be as big as yesterday’s rockers.

Radio used to have the power to make even a lower-quality rock release popular. However, the fragmentation of the music industry—fans using multiple formats and splintering across rock, hip-hop, country and electronic music—means most acts will never find the same big audiences......WHAT ABOUT CONCERTS?

Young megastars like Beyoncé, Taylor Swift and country acts like Carrie Underwood make most of their money on tour. And there will be a successive generation of touring veterans like Lady Gaga, Justin Timberlake and Nicki Minaj, along with unexpected reunions and area headliners.

But many acts today from rapper Future to rockers Japandroids don’t generate colossal sums compared with older stars.......WHAT HAPPENS NOW?

The concert business is going in two directions: diversifying into festivals and smaller venues, to focus on younger audiences, while continuing to squeeze every opportunity out of the boomer market.

Joe Edwards, a St. Louis music-venue owner, sees the industry shifting focus from big venues such as amphitheaters to the smaller 1,000 to 3,000-seat venues suited to today’s artists. “I see more acts loving those sizes,” he says, since the artists don’t have to wait to play bigger stages. “Smaller venues will be very popular,” he says.

To reach younger audiences, Live Nation, the country’s biggest concert promoter, has been on a music-festival-buying spree. Last spring, the company bought a majority stake in Founders Entertainment, which runs New York’s Governors Ball festival, part of a strategy that diversifies its business away from the 40-plus amphitheaters it runs.
aging  artists  attention_spans  celebrities  concerts  deaths  golden_oldies  legacy_artists  Live_Nation  live_performances  music  music_industry  music_festivals  music_venues  rock-'n'-roll  small_formats  small_spaces  superstars  touring 
march 2017 by jerryking
How to Become a ‘Superager’ - The New York Times
Gray Matter
By LISA FELDMAN BARRETT DEC. 31, 2016

make a New Year’s resolution to take up a challenging activity. Learn a foreign language. Take an online college course. Master a musical instrument. Work that brain. Make it a year to remember.

Think about the last time you grappled with a math problem or pushed yourself to your physical limits. Hard work makes you feel bad in the moment. The Marine Corps has a motto that embodies this principle: “Pain is weakness leaving the body.” That is, the discomfort of exertion means you’re building muscle and discipline. Superagers are like Marines: They excel at pushing past the temporary unpleasantness of intense effort. Studies suggest that the result is a more youthful brain that helps maintain a sharper memory and a greater ability to pay attention.
aging  howto  cognitive_skills  USMC  resolutions  discomforts  hard_work  struggles  longevity  pay_attention  arduous 
january 2017 by jerryking
Aging in the Key of Humor - The New York Times
Timothy Egan MAY 20, 2016
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aging 
may 2016 by jerryking
Getting past ageism and back to work after a late job loss - The Globe and Mail
CAMILLA CORNELL
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2015

.................networking with your own contacts first. “The people who know you understand your talents and what you’re capable of,” he says. “It’s much better than being just another résumé on a desk, where the manager thinks, ‘Oh my gosh, he has 30 years’ experience. He’s probably deader than a doornail.’”.....don’t rule out employment with smaller companies. “The jobs have greater scope, so they’re interesting,” he says. “And because they have greater scope, those companies need to hire people who are experienced. They can’t hire a young buck because he won’t be able to handle everything that needs to happen in that job.”.......The key message for mature job-seekers, says Mr. Richter: Don’t lose faith. “Keep trying and be secure in the fact that you do have a good track record and a well-developed set of skills,” he says. “You do have something to contribute.”..
aging  retirement  Second_Acts  entrepreneurship  ageism  midlife  Managing_Your_Career  job_search  small_business  networking 
may 2016 by jerryking
Coming of Age, Whether They Like It or Not - The New York Times
By MEGAN RUBINER ZINN JANUARY 31, 2016

The various cultures that created coming-of-age rituals knew what they were doing, and it’s not surprising that the rituals have maintained a place in the modern world. At this cusp of the teen years, when kids are excited and afraid to be adults, when they try out new personalities by the day, when their sense of self may be dictated by their peers and the media, they have an accomplishment that is all theirs. It need not be a religious or cultural ritual, just a challenging, adult responsibility. In the case of a bar or bat mitzvah, kids take on something that is extraordinarily hard, something that requires persistence and focus for months, if not years, something that they may not want to do. And they do it, in front of their family and friends, and they do it very well. From there, no matter what challenges these kids meet: a difficult class, paper, exam, a scary responsibility, decision or action, they can look back on this day and remind themselves of what they accomplished when they were only 13.
Judaism  Jewish  rituals  aging  children  coming-of-age  persistence  arduous  focus  stressful  perseverance  endurance 
january 2016 by jerryking
An ailing titan of the small screen
October 10-11| FT| By Matthew Garrahan

In its 1980s heyday, MTV was the coolest brand in media. The music video channel was name-checked in pop hits, helped turn acts such as Michael Jackson into h...
Sumner_Redstone  moguls  MTV  Viacom  television  aging  CBS  digital_media 
november 2015 by jerryking
To Get a Job in Your 50s, Maintain Friendships in Your 40s - The New York Times
SEPT. 26, 2015 | NYT | By PHYLLIS KORKKI.

in the job search process, the number of connections we maintain in our professional and personal networks is often critical.

As people age, they also tend to stay in the same job longer, consistent with a pattern of wanting to put down roots. During that time, the skills people have learned and the job search strategies they once used may become outdated — especially as technology evolves ever more quickly.

The cure for these drawbacks is fairly straightforward. Once you hit your early 40s, even if you are not looking for a job, work to learn new skills and stretch yourself, Professor Wanberg said. Also, keep your networks strong by staying in touch with former colleagues and classmates, along with current co-workers and clients whom you don’t see regularly, she said.
job_search  friendships  networking  aging  midlife  howto  co-workers 
september 2015 by jerryking
The Right Dose of Exercise for a Longer Life - NYTimes.com
By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS APRIL 15, 2015

Exercise has had a Goldilocks problem, with experts debating just how much exercise is too little, too much or just the right amount to improve health and longevity. ....The current broad guidelines from governmental and health organizations call for 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week to build and maintain health and fitness.

But whether that amount of exercise represents the least amount that someone should do — the minimum recommended dose — or the ideal amount has not been certain....Those who met the guidelines precisely, completing 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise, enjoyed greater longevity benefits and 31 percent less risk of dying during the 14-year period compared with those who never exercised.

The sweet spot for exercise benefits, however, came among those who tripled the recommended level of exercise, working out moderately, mostly by walking, for 450 minutes per week, or a little more than an hour per day. Those people were 39 percent less likely to die prematurely than people who never exercised.
longevity  aging  exercise  fitness 
april 2015 by jerryking
Finding Success, Well Past the Age of Wunderkind - NYTimes.com
MARCH 20, 2015 |NYT| By ABBY ELLIN.

In his book, “Old Masters and Young Geniuses: The Two Life Cycles of Artistic Creativity,” David W. Galenson, a professor of economics at the University of Chicago, argues that there are two kinds of practitioners in most given fields: conceptual and experimental. Conceptual minds tend to be younger and typically better with abstractions. Experimental minds, on the other hand, take longer to gestate, working by trial and error. This helps explain why, for example, conceptual artist Pablo Picasso produced his greatest work at age 26, whereas Paul Cézanne created his at 67. “To say every discipline has its peak age is wrong,” Mr. Galenson said.
Second_Acts  retirement  books  Pablo_Picasso  aging  experimentation  wunderkind  late_bloomers 
march 2015 by jerryking
Eight steps to better health after 40 - The Globe and Mail
ALEX ALLAN - HEALTH ADVISOR
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Mar. 08 2015
aging  exercise  midlife  sleep  strength_training  fitness  stretching  gratitude 
march 2015 by jerryking
Alan Cumming: Why I keep dancing as time marches on - The Globe and Mail
ALAN CUMMING
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Feb. 18 2015
aging  actors  Hollywood  milestones  inspiration 
february 2015 by jerryking
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