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Get Smart | Ivey Alumni
Pat Morden | Mar 5, 2018
Artificial intelligence is transforming business and life

Element AI when it was launched in 2017. The company’s co-founder, Yoshua Bengio, is a leading researcher in deep learning. “We help our customers strategize about what their industry will look like five to 10 years out,” Dhalla says. “Then we determine what things we should be doing with AI now to build cognitive muscle.”

So far, Element AI has built everything from recommendation engines to fraud-detection systems. The team is in the process of working with a media company to create an engine that will read articles written by journalists and select appropriate imagery to illustrate them. Another project involves working with a large international bank to envision the future of banking in 10 years and then figure out where to deploy AI solutions now. “We don’t believe in commodity AI,” says Dhalla. “You need insight to understand what it will mean in the context of running your business.”.......Speech recognition is one area where AI is poised to have a dramatic impact.  Fluent.ai's proprietary software is “acoustic-only,” meaning that it doesn’t need to translate speech to text to understand commands. It offers high accuracy and works without an Internet connection, so it’s ideal for wearables and smart devices. Moreover, it can be quickly trained to understand any language, making Fluent.ai a global company out of the blocks. “We believe that voice is the ideal user interface for any technology,” Bhargava says. “Our technology enables that.”
Fluent.ai software is already being used by several customers. One is producing a smart watch that can be used by children to get in touch with their parents in emergency situations. Another is a telecommunications company using AI in its call centre. The company is working to develop business in China, which Bhargava says is “... a fast-moving, hungry market that recognizes the validity of our differentiation.”.....“Nearly every digital product you use already has some machine learning or more advanced AI components to it. In future, every digital company will be driven by AI.”
alumni  artificial_intelligence  deep_learning  Element_AI  Fluent.ai  Ivey  Layer_6  machine_learning  Udacity 
11 weeks ago by jerryking
At Howard University, Homecoming Is a Pilgrimage
November 17, 2019 The New York Times | Written by Bianca Ladipo.

At Howard University in Washington, homecoming encompasses more than collegiate nostalgia; it’s a celebration of black culture, a music and arts festival, a history lesson, a community reunion.....The weekend, which usually falls in mid-October, begins with Yardfest, held on the several-acre green at the heart of the 152-year-old historically black university.......Over the last decade, institutions of higher education across the country have struggled with declining enrollment, historically black colleges and universities being among the hardest hit. But recently, enrollment at H.B.C.U.s has begun to rebound as the schools have become increasingly visible in the culture. .... Howard aka“The Mecca.”....the term emerged after the Civil Rights Movement. In the wake of the death of Malcolm X and in the spirit of the Black Power movement, students began to informally refer to the campus as “The Mecca of black education.”... the current political climate is causing young black students to think in new ways about the college experience — what it means to grow intellectually in a predominantly black space. Homecoming pilgrimages at H.B.C.U.s, he added, are unique reflections of such spaces and their histories.....While most of Howard’s students are not affiliated with sororities and fraternities, the presence of Greek life is strong. Trees around the campus yard are painted with the emblems of each organization, marking meeting places for members. Of the nine national Black Greek letter organizations, five of them were founded at Howard. 
African-Americans  alumni  blackness  Black_Power  black_pride  Colleges_&_Universities  education  emotional_connections  fraternities  friendships  hard_times  HBCUs  homecoming  Howard  pilgrimage  Washington_D.C.   
november 2019 by jerryking
Meagan Prins: ‘Think about and define your values’
August 5, 2019 | The Globe and Mail| KARL MOORE AND MORGAN DAVIS
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

The best piece of advice I’ve ever received is to be “intentional,” and take the time to think hard about the role you want to play in the world. It’s so easy to find yourself stuck in a routine, working in a job that doesn’t put you on track to achieve your long-term goals. It’s important to think about and define your values to understand what you want to accomplish in the long run.
advice  alumni  IFC  intentionality  life-changing  McGill  values  women 
august 2019 by jerryking
Mellody Hobson of Ariel Investments: ‘Capitalism Needs to Work for Everyone’
July 18, 2019 | The New York Times | By David Gelles.

Mellody Hobson was raised by a single mother and endured economic hardship as a child. The phone was shut off. The car was repossessed. Her family was evicted.

Today, Ms. Hobson is one of the most senior black women in finance. She serves on the boards of JPMorgan Chase and Starbucks, and this month was named co-chief executive of Ariel Investments, the largest minority-owned investment firm.......I was in the Woodrow Wilson School of international relations and public policy at Princeton. You have to apply to get in, and I did not originally get in. I lobbied really hard and called many people. I just would not take no for an answer.

I spent a lot of my years in the Woodrow Wilson School studying systems that really oppress people. I wrote my senior thesis on South Africa, and specifically on how children ultimately led to the end of apartheid because of their uprisings.........What do you tell people who are starting on their financial journey, wherever they might be?

I start off by explaining to them that it’s never too late, literally never. I also think the most important thing you can learn about money, and Warren Buffett talks about this, is compound interest. It’s the eighth wonder of the world. If you understand compound interest, you understand money working for or against you.

We talk about long-term patient investing, and that idea that slow and steady does win the race, that time can be your best friend when it comes to investing. That’s why we have a turtle as a logo at Ariel........ I believe in capitalism. It is the best system that has existed in the world. Show me a better one. I can’t find it. But I also believe that capitalism needs to work for everyone, and so I don’t begrudge those people who’ve done extraordinarily well in our society as long as it’s a fair fight.

It isn’t always a fair fight, though, and that’s what we need to fix. That could be anything from our tax bases and how that works, our tax rates, to other issues that occur in our society around fair opportunities for education.

I am a person of color who happens to be a woman as well, and I have firsthand dealt with inequality, despite having shown up with all of the credentials. I do not sit here believing that if you’ve just gone to a great school and this, that and the other, it’s all going to be fine. It just doesn’t work like that in our society. I think about those people who were like me and are like me. That goes into the boardrooms that I’m in. I also think about the people of color who are inside of those companies, making sure they get the same opportunity as those who are in the majority population....
African-Americans  alumni  Ariel  capitalism  CEOs  finance  inequality  investing  Mellody_Hobson  money_management  Princeton  women 
july 2019 by jerryking
‘We Know Them. We Trust Them.’ Uber and Airbnb Alumni Fuel Tech’s Next Wave.
March 13, 2019 | The New York Times | By Erin Griffith.

......“There are just not that many places to find people who have seen that kind of scale,” said Ryan Graves, Uber’s former senior vice president of global operations and a member of the company’s board.

Each city that Uber, Airbnb, Lyft or Postmates expanded into created a new set of operational, regulatory and business challenges. Regulators balked. Rival business operators resisted. Neighbors protested. And people abused the platforms, over and over.

Uber managers ran each city like a mini-start-up. “If you were the general manager of San Francisco or of Atlanta, you were the C.E.O. of your region,” ..... “It led to a really entrepreneurial approach from everyone.”......
Airbnb  alumni  Andreessen_Horowitz  gig_economy  IPOs  networks  new_businesses  on-demand  scaling  Silicon_Valley  start_ups  Uber  vc  venture_capital 
march 2019 by jerryking
Constellation Software may have to revisit its retreat into silence - The Globe and Mail
DAVID MILSTEAD
PUBLISHED 2 DAYS AGO
UPDATED 2 DAYS AGOFOR SUBSCRIBERS

So far this year, less has been more for Constellation Software Inc.

Less communication, as chief executive Mark Leonard has decided to abandon his regular shareholders' letters, and his company has ended quarterly earnings conference calls and announced it will no longer reveal certain performance metrics.
dealmakers  software  mergers_&_acquisitions  consolidation  Ivey  alumni  Constellation 
august 2018 by jerryking
Donors should propel Oxford down the Ivy League diversity road
May 26, 2018 | Financial Times | David Lammy.

Elite Eastern institutions are using aggressive outreach campaigns to attract applicants who might otherwise be unaware of the schools’ generous financial-aid packages.
diversity  Colleges_&_Universities  outreach  Oxford  applicants  economically_disadvantaged  United_Kingdom  alumni  admissions  minorities  Black_British  donations  donors  Ivy_League 
may 2018 by jerryking
Former Google CFO Patrick Pichette sets his sights on keeping Canadian tech talent at home - The Globe and Mail
TAMSIN MCMAHON U.S. CORRESPONDENT
PALO ALTO, CALIF.
PUBLISHED MAY 13, 2018

As the chief financial officer of Google, Montreal native Patrick Pichette would often make the trip home from Silicon Valley with the message that Canadian companies were too slow in fully embracing the digital economy. These days, he’s offering a different message for Canadian startups: Stay home.

Nearly three years ago, Mr. Pichette quit his US$20-million-a-year job as a senior executive at one of the world’s most powerful internet companies with plans to explore the world.

Now, after almost two years of steady travel, Mr. Pichette, 55, is focusing on the next chapter of his post-Google career. For that, he has set his sights on Canada, where he hopes to invest in building the next generation of entrepreneurial talent.

Earlier this year, he joined Canadian venture firm iNovia as a general partner, attracted by both its strategy to fund Canadian startups in order to keep them at home, but also by the firm’s global ambitions. Mr. Pichette is in the process of moving to Britain for the next several years, where he will establish a London office for iNovia and help steer the firm’s European expansion.

Persistent fears over a brain drain to the United States flared up again this month when researchers at the University of Toronto and Brock University in St. Catharines, Ont., published a study showing that as many as two-thirds of software-engineering graduates from the top Canadian schools were heading abroad to work, often to established firms in Silicon Valley, where they can earn significantly higher salaries.

Mr. Pichette argues that Canada has other advantages for its homegrown tech talent: an expanding tech ecosystem to support entrepreneurs, a more affordable work force for growing startups to tap into and a drastically lower cost of living than the San Francisco Bay Area.
Patrick_Pichette  Google  alumni  iNovia  venture_capital  vc  talent  heritage_migration  software_developers  brain_drain  Silicon_Valley  CFOs  crossborder 
may 2018 by jerryking
Opinion | How to Level the College Playing Field
April 7, 2018 | The New York Times | By Harold O. Levy with Peg Tyre. Mr. Levy is a former chancellor of the New York City public schools. He wrote this article with the education journalist Peg Tyre.

Despite the best efforts of many, the gap between the numbers of rich and poor college graduates continues to grow.

It’s true that access programs take some academically talented children from poor and working-poor families to selective colleges, but that pipeline remains frustratingly narrow. And some colleges and universities have adopted aggressive policies to create economic diversity on campus. But others are lagging. Too many academically talented children who come from families where household income hovers at the American median of $59,000 or below are shut out of college or shunted away from selective universities.....The wealthy spend tens of thousands each year on private school tuition or property taxes to ensure that their children attend schools that provide a rich, deep college preparatory curriculum. On top of that, many of them spend thousands more on application coaches, test-prep tutors and essay editors. ......
(1) Let’s start with alumni. It is common to harbor fond feelings toward your alma mater. But to be a responsible, forward-looking member of your college’s extended community, look a little deeper. Make it your business to figure out exactly who your college serves. What is the economic breakdown of the current student body? Some colleges trumpet data about underrepresented minorities and first-generation students. But many don’t. And either way, there are follow-up questions to ask. How has that mix changed over the past 10 years? What policies are in place to increase those numbers?
(2) Legacy admission must end.
(3) shorten the college tour.
(4) cities and states should help students who come from the middle and working classes with programs that provide intensive advising, money for textbooks and even MetroCards
(5) Refine the first two years of some four-year liberal arts education into an accredited associate degree.
(6) Stop acting like everyone already has the road map to college plotted. The college application system has become costly and baroque. Make it possible for high schools to hire, train and deploy enough guidance counselors.
(7) stop giving to your alma mater. Donors to top universities are getting hefty tax deductions to support a system that can seem calculated to ensure that the rich get richer. If you feel you must give, try earmarking your donation for financial aid for low-income, community college students who have applied to transfer to your alma mater.
Colleges_&_Universities  accessibility  legacies  roadmaps  admissions  op-ed  unfair_advantages  social_mobility  meritocratic  alumni  hereditary  nepotism  education  self-perpetuation  super_ZIPs  opportunity_gaps  college-educated  upper-income  compounded  low-income  elitism  selectivity  follow-up_questions 
april 2018 by jerryking
Constitutional reform pressure group formed; members free to get into active politics
July 5, 2017 | Demerara Waves | Denis Chabrol.
Jainaraine Singh, Marcel Gaskin, Renatta Chuck-a-Sang and Terrence Campbell.

Reform, Inform, Sustain Educate (RISE) Guyana, a newly-formed non-profit organisation, on Wednesday announced that it would be embarking on a countrywide push for reforming Guyana’s constitution over the next two years, and said its members are free to engage in active politics with any party of their choice.
constitutions  Guyana  nonprofit  BHS  alumni  RISE 
july 2017 by jerryking
How business schools can create loyalty among alumni - The Globe and Mail
JENNIFER LEWINGTON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May 11
Ivey  business_schools  customer_loyalty  alumni 
may 2017 by jerryking
Cyber Heroes | Ivey Alumni | Ivey Business School
Craig believes that businesses and individuals, even countries, must accept that we live in an “era of compromise.” “You have to understand that somebody already has your sensitive data, likely a former employee,” he says. “Have you rehearsed roles for when that becomes public? Does the CEO know what she needs to say? Does the IT team know what they need to do? Being prepared with an appropriate response to data loss is a leading practice that helps maintain, or even build, an organization’s reputation.”
alumni  business-continuity  CEOs  contingency_planning  cyber_security  data_breaches  insurance  Ivey  rehearsals  risks  vulnerabilities 
march 2017 by jerryking
Wealth Management Simplified | Ivey Alumni | Ivey Business School
It was the proceeds Katchen earned from that sale, and a love for investing dating back to his childhood, that led him to launch online investment manager Wealthsimple in September 2014.

“Investing has always been a hobby of mine,” says Katchen, the youngest of three siblings, all of whom attended Ivey. (One sister specialized in marketing, the other sister in finance, while Katchen chose the entrepreneurship stream).

Wealthsimple, now the largest online investment manager in Canada, has 60 employees, about 25,000 customers, and close to $1 billion in assets. The financial technology company offers an alternative to traditional ways of managing investments, catering to consumers – in particular Millennials – who are comfortable with online banking and investing.

Katchen has a vision to build Wealthsimple into “one of the largest and most innovative financial services firms in the world,” including plans to expand outside of Canada to places such as the U.S. and Europe.
Ivey  alumni  WealthSimple  CEOs  start_ups  personal_finance  investment_management 
march 2017 by jerryking
Growing a Different Apple - The New York Times
January 2, 2017 | NYT | By Vindu Goel

Founded in 2014 by three former senior managers from Apple’s iPod and iPhone groups, Pearl has tried to replicate what its leaders view as the best parts of Apple’s culture, like its fanatical dedication to quality and beautiful design. But the founders also consciously rejected some of the less appealing aspects of life at Apple, like its legendary secrecy and top-down management style.

The start-up, which makes high-tech accessories for cars, holds weekly meetings with its entire staff. Managers brief them on coming products, company finances, technical problems, even the presentations made to the board....Pearl’s siren song was appealing: Make the roads safer by giving tens of millions of older autos the same high-tech safety features that the newest models have.....Like Apple, though, Pearl is playing the long game. Engineers are already testing self-parking technology and other driver-assistance features for future products. So far, the company has raised $50 million from prominent venture capital firms, including Accel, Shasta Ventures and Venrock, but Mr. Gardner said it would need to raise more money in 2017.
Apple  alumni  design  detail_oriented  organizational_culture  accessories  automotive_industry  automobile  safety  Pearl  new_products  long-term 
january 2017 by jerryking
Engineer Extraordinaire, Charles Ceres, is a ‘Special Person’
Oct 30, 2016 | Kaieteur News | By Sharmain Grainger.

“I want people to remember Charles Ceres the person, not what profession I was in. Whatever I have acquired hasn’t changed me. The difference between me and a lot of people is that I know the difference between who I am and what I do…what I do is not who I am.”
Queen’s  alumni  engineering  humility  Afro-Guyanese  management_consulting  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship 
october 2016 by jerryking
Zen and the art of banking - Western Alumni
 Alumni Gazette  Winter 2016
Zen and the art of banking

by David Scott
alumni  Ivey  banking  financial_services  motorcycles  CEOs 
february 2016 by jerryking
Changing face of fast food
 Fall 2015 | - Western Alumni | Daniel P. Smith
Changing face of fast food

by Daniel P. Smith
UWO  alumni  fast-food  fresh_produce  Freshii 
november 2015 by jerryking
What my Goldman Sachs training taught me about entrepreneurship - FT.com
March 31, 2015 2:17 pm
What my Goldman Sachs training taught me about entrepreneurship
Jason Gissing
United_Kingdom  alumni  Goldman_Sachs  London  entrepreneur  traders 
november 2015 by jerryking
Google Should Feel Lucky in Its Finance Chief Hire - NYTimes.com
MARCH 24, 2015 | NYT | Robert Cyran is a columnist for Reuters Breakingviews. For more independent commentary and analysis, visit breakingviews.com.

Google should feel lucky about its search for a new chief financial officer.

There’s a dearth of executives with the financial, technology and government know-how needed to help run a $400 billion company. Even fewer women fit the bill. Silicon Valley and Wall Street just can’t find people like Morgan Stanley’s chief financial officer, Ruth Porat, fast enough. The challenge is to create more like her.

Ms. Porat grew up in Palo Alto, Calif., and graduated from Stanford before embarking on an almost three-decade career in investment banking.
CFOs  Google  Silicon_Valley  Wall_Street  women  Stanford  alumni  Andrew_Sorkin 
march 2015 by jerryking
Hunting for bird courses with potential - Western Alumni
by Paul Wells, BA'89 January 13, 2015

I never did take that course.

I now wish I had. First, because it’s a bad idea to let yourself get scared away too easily. Second, because out here in the real world, it’s hardly unusual to find yourself dedicating six consecutive hours
of hard work to the pursuit of a worthy goal. I’ve been thinking about the second reason lately. One of the things a university education should prepare you for, arguably — well, I’m going to argue it — is the experience of handling a crushing workload, at least once, at least briefly, and surviving to tell the tale.
Paul_Wells  UWO  alumni  Colleges_&_Universities  self-confidence  grit  hard_work  in_the_real_world 
january 2015 by jerryking
America’s elite: An hereditary meritocracy
Jan 24th 2015 | The Economist | Anonymous.

America has always had rich and powerful families, from the floor of the Senate to the boardrooms of the steel industry. But it has also held more fervently than any other country the belief that all comers can penetrate that elite as long as they have talent, perseverance and gumption....But now, the american elite is self-perpetuating by dint of school ties, wealth....Today’s elite is a long way from the rotten lot of West Egg. Compared to those of days past it is by and large more talented, better schooled, harder working (and more fabulously remunerated) and more diligent in its parental duties. It is not a place where one easily gets by on birth or connections alone. At the same time it is widely seen as increasingly hard to get into.

Some self-perpetuation by elites is unavoidable; the children of America’s top dogs benefit from nepotism just as those in all other societies do. But something else is now afoot. More than ever before, America’s elite is producing children who not only get ahead, but deserve to do so: they meet the standards of meritocracy better than their peers, and are thus worthy of the status they inherit....wealthy parents pass their advantage(s) on to their children....
Colleges_&_Universities  elitism  hereditary  Matthew_effect  nepotism  education  values  parenting  public_education  legacies  admissions  alumni  endowments  SAT  social_mobility  self-perpetuation  super_ZIPs  opportunity_gaps  college-educated  upper-income  compounded  meritocratic  cultural_transmission 
january 2015 by jerryking
View Fall 2014
Fall 2014| View is the University of Windsor alumni magazine
uWindsor  alumni  magazines 
december 2014 by jerryking
Lives Lived: Timothy Snelgrove, 69 - The Globe and Mail
JOHN LOWNSBROUGH
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Dec. 12 2014
obituaries  tributes  Ivey  alumni  entrepreneur  mentoring 
december 2014 by jerryking
Guyana’s Queens College to mark 170th anniversary • Caribbean Life
October 23, 2014 / Caribbean / New York local / Guyana
Guyana’s Queens College to mark 170th anniversary
Tangerine Clarke
high_schools  Guyana  anniversaries  alumni  QC  education  legacies 
october 2014 by jerryking
John Telesphore Bart
OCTOBER 1, 2014 | G&M | John Telesphore Bart
obituaries  Ivey  howto  shareholder_activism  RMC  alumni  DIY 
october 2014 by jerryking
Toying with success - Western Alumni
Fall 2014
Toying with success
by David Scott August 22, 2014
Spin_Master  Ivey  UWO  alumni  toys  entrepreneur 
september 2014 by jerryking
Spin Master tips for graduates & legal challenges - Western Alumni
 Fall 2014
Spin Master tips for graduates & legal challenges
by David Scott August 22, 2014
toys  alumni  Ivey  UWO 
september 2014 by jerryking
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