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jerryking : annus_mirabilis   5

Review: A reminder of why 1999 was the best movie year ever
June 22, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by BARRY HERTZ.

Brian Raftery’s new book, Best. Movie. Year. Ever: How 1999 Blew Up the Big Screen, both an exciting and dubious proposition. We are barely halfway through 2019, and yet I feel as if I’ve already read everything that I could possibly need to know about the cinema of two decades years ago. (Admittedly, this is because I’ve written more than a few thousand words about the era myself. Hey, these pages aren’t going to fill themselves.) By this point, don’t we all know why Galaxy Quest and Go and Run Lola Run and American Beauty are important to today’s cultural firmament, in one way or another? Thankfully, the answer is: no.
'90s  anniversaries  annus_mirabilis  books  book_reviews  cultural_touchpoints  films  generational_touchstones  movies  popular_culture 
june 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | The Best Year of Our Lives
April 6, 2019 | The New York Times | By Ross Douthat.

There’s a theory of human psychology that holds that the time you enter maturity becomes fixed in your mind as a civilizational peak — with everything since a falling-off that conveniently matches your own stagger toward the grave. Thus it doesn’t matter if you came of age in the Great Depression or some other nadir; because you were 18 then, it must have been a golden age......I’ve been thinking about how good we had it lately because we’re 20 years out from 1999, and the cultural press is thick with reminders that it was a pop-culture annus mirabilis — from the premiere of “The Sopranos” that defined a golden age of television, to the yearlong cascade of brilliant movies .....from a Hollywood not yet captive to the superhero era......Widen the aperture a little, so that the “Xennial” cultural era covers 1995 to 2005, and you get everything from the perfection of the sitcom (late “Seinfeld,” season one of “Friends,” the silver age of “The Simpsons,” “Arrested Development”) to the peak of HBO (when “The Wire” and “The Sopranos” and “Deadwood” and “Sex and the City” were all airing). Oh, and those were also the days when George R.R. Martin could publish three “Game of Thrones” novels in five years, inventing all the good parts of the TV show’s plot in an end-of-millennium rush.....cold hard economic data also suggest that ours was a uniquely blessed coming-of-age: a time of low unemployment, surging productivity, strong working-class wage growth — and all without a huge overhang of public and private debt.......a statement about generational experiences, Alter was basically right. If you were born around 1980, you grew up in a space happily between — between eras of existential threat (Cold War/War on Terror, or Cold War/climate change), between foreign policy debacles (Vietnam/Iraq), between epidemics (crack and AIDS/opioids and suicide), and between two different periods of economic stagnation (the ’70s and early Aughts).
'90s  op-ed  Alexandria_Ocasio-Cortez  annus_mirabilis  coming-of-age  cultural_gatekeepers  films  generational_touchstones  golden_age  millennials  movies  noughties  popular_culture  Ross_Douthat  television  shared_consciousness  shared_experiences  The_Wire  wage_growth 
april 2019 by jerryking
1999 at the movies: The year of living dangerously - The Globe and Mail
BARRY HERTZ
PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 1, 2018

it is easy to call 1999 the last great year at the movies.

Or at least that's the (convincing) argument made by Canadian television writer Phillip Iscove and his American colleague Kenny Neibart in the pair's new project, Podcast Like It's 1999. The series, available now on iTunes, aims to dissect all 250 major releases of that wonderful, overwhelming year – before, as the pair put it in their debut episode, reality television, HBO and the internet divided everyone's attention.

"It just feels, and has for a while, like a seminal year for movies. It's undeniable,"

.....Which brings up the question of whether 1999 is a true watershed moment, or perhaps more of a generational touchstone for those currently active and wielding power in the creative industries......Raftery’s book is not satisfied until it delivers the definitive portrait of one astounding year at the movies from those who were there, watching along in the dark.
'90s  anniversaries  annus_mirabilis  books  book_reviews  cultural_touchpoints  films  generational_touchstones  golden_age  movies  popular_culture  turning_points 
february 2018 by jerryking
The Last Good Year
September 29, 1997 | Maclean's | Pierre Berton

https://archive.macleans.ca/article/1997/9/29/the-last-good-year

It was a golden year, and so it seems in retrospect—a year in which we let off steam like schoolboys whooping and hollering at term’s end. We all thought big that year. The symbolic birthday cake on Parliament Hill stood 30 feet high: ice cream and cake for 30,000 kids and hang the expense! Over and over again, we showed the world what Canadians could do: Nancy Greene grabbing the World Cup for skiing; Elaine Tanner, the aquatic Mighty Mouse, taking four medals at the Pan-American Games; Marshall McLuhan on every magazine cover.

By a number of measurements, we are a great deal better off today than we were 30 years ago. We are healthier and we are wealthier than we were in 1967. The real net worth of the average Canadian is almost double what it was back then. Babies born today can expect to live longer—six years more than the centennial crop of babies.

Why, then, do we look back to 1967 as a golden year compared with 1997? If we are better off today, why all the hand-wringing? There are several reasons, but the big one, certainly, is the very real fear that the country we celebrated so joyously 30 years ago is in the process of falling apart. In that sense, 1967 was the last good year before all Canadians began to be concerned about the future of our country.
1967  nostalgia  anniversaries  nationalism  '60s  centenaries  pride  Pierre_Berton  Expo_67  retrospectives  annus_mirabilis  turning_points 
august 2012 by jerryking
When the World Tilted--Again - WSJ.com
JUNE 15, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By EDWARD KOSNER who
reviews 1959: The Year Everything Changed, By Fred Kaplan (Wiley, 322
pages, $27.95). Kaplan, a magazine writer and columnist for Slate,
makes an intriguing case that 1959 was an authentic annus mirabilis. It
was the year that Fidel Castro took power in Cuba, Berry Gordy started
Motown records in Detroit, Allen Ginsberg recited "Howl" at Columbia,
the Pioneer spacecraft blasted off, the dirtiest version of "Lady
Chatterley's Lover" was published, Toyota and Datsun (now Nissan) made
their American debuts and Ford mercy-killed the Edsel, the microchip was
introduced, the first U.S. soldiers were killed in Vietnam, Frank Lloyd
Wright's Guggenheim Museum opened, MLK went to India to study
nonviolence, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg were shown at the
MoMA, and Searle sought approval to sell the first birth-control pill,
Enovid. In sum, a year "when the world as we now know it began to take
form."
annus_mirabilis  book_reviews  '60s  MLK  Fred_Kaplan  Berry_Gordy 
august 2010 by jerryking

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