recentpopularlog in

jerryking : appliances   5

The Data Companies Wish They Had About Customers - WSJ
March 23, 2014 | WSJ | by Max Taves.

We asked companies what data they wish they had—and how they would use it. Here's what they said....
(A) Dining----Graze.com has a huge appetite for data. Every hour, the mail-order snack business digests 15,000 user ratings about its foods, which it uses to better understand what its customers like or dislike and to predict what else they might like to try...more data could help him understand customers' tastes even better. Among the information he wants most is data about customers' dietary habits, such as what they buy at grocery stores, as well as better information about what they look at on Graze's own site. And because the dietary needs of children change rapidly, he'd like to know if his customers have children and, if so, their ages.
(B) Energy-----Energy consumption is among its customers' main concerns, says CEO William Lynch. For instance, the company offers a product giving homeowners the real-time ability to see things like how many kilowatts it takes to heat the hot tub in Jan. Because of privacy concerns, Savant doesn't collect homeowners' energy data. But if the company knew more about customers' energy use, it could help create customized plans to conserve energy. "We could make recommendations on how to set up your thermostat to save a lot of money,
(C) Banking-----the Bank of the West would like "predictive life-event data" about its customers—like graduation, vacation or retirement plans—to create products more relevant to their financial needs...At this point, collecting that breadth of data is a logistical and regulatory challenge, requiring very different sources both inside and outside the bank.
(D) Appliances-----Whirlpool Corp.has a vast reach in American households—but wants to know more about its customers and how they actually use its products. Real-time use data could not only help shape the future designs of Whirlpool products, but also help the company predict when they're likely to fail.
(E) Healthcare----Explorys creates software for health-care companies to store, access and make sense of their data. It holds a huge trove of clinical, financial and operational information—but would like access to data about patients at home, such as their current blood-sugar and oxygen levels, weight, heart rates and respiratory health. Having access to that information could help providers predict things like hospitalizations, missed appointments and readmissions and proactively reach out to patients,
(F) Healthcare----By analyzing patient data, Carolinas HealthCare System of Charlotte, N.C., can predict readmission rates with 80% accuracy,
(G) Law----law firms that specialize in defense work are typically reactive, however some are working towards becoming more proactive, coveting an ability to predict lawsuits—and prevent them.How? By analyzing reams of contracts and looking for common traits and language that often lead to problems.
(H) Defense---BAE Systems PLC invests heavily in protecting itself from cyberattacks. But it says better data from its suppliers could help improve its defenses...if its suppliers get cyberattacked, its own h/w and s/w could be compromised. But "those suppliers are smaller businesses with lesser investments in their security," ...A lack of trust among suppliers, even those that aren't direct competitors, means only a small percentage of them disclose the data showing the cyberattacks on their systems. Sharing that data, he says, would strengthen the security of every product BAE makes. [BAE is expressing recognition of its vulnerability to network risk].
data  data_driven  massive_data_sets  Graze  banking  cyber_security  BAE  law_firms  Whirlpool  genomics  social_data  appliances  sense-making  predictive_analytics  dark_data  insights  customer_insights  real-time  design  failure  cyberattacks  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  network_risk  shifting_tastes  self-protection  distrust  supply_chains 
november 2014 by jerryking
For Some Manufacturers, There Are Benefits to Keeping Production at Home - WSJ.com
January 22, 2007 | WSJ | By MARK WHITEHOUSE.

much of what can go abroad already has, leaving behind what can and should be made in the U.S. One area of strength: high-end goods like top-of-the-line $6,000 Sony Grand WEGA TV sets and $15,000 Sub-Zero PRO 48 refrigerators, which appeal to the affluent folks who have been driving much of the growth in U.S. consumer spending.

"It's the very high-end products," says Daniel Meckstroth, chief economist at Manufacturers Alliance, a trade group. "Manufacturers who have niche markets in high-end products have a very good outlook."...."Manufacturing is contributing to the welfare of the economy in terms of standard of living, but it's not generating net new jobs," says Mr. Meckstroth. "The electronics sector is one of the areas where that's most visible."
manufacturers  offshoring  white_goods  Sub-Zero  appliances  onshoring  high-end  consumer_electronics 
june 2012 by jerryking
Haier Goals
November 20, 2005 | New York Times | By ROB WALKER

Haier and other Chinese companies are now "differentiating themselves through innovation," Sull says. Instead of a "technology push" approach (a Bell Labs cranking out wonderful inventions that are then pushed into the marketplace), he adds, they are adept at using a "consumer pull" strategy, studying and responding to their customers' needs. Haier sells its products in more than 150 countries and was in the news recently as a possible buyer of Maytag.
Bell_Labs  Haier  white_goods  Chinese  wines  China  manufacturers  appliances  branding  Donald_Sull 
october 2011 by jerryking
Why Won't Anyone Clean the Refrigerator? - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 24, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By ANJALI ATHAVALEY.
Most Americans Tidy Their Refrigerators Only Once or Twice a Year;
Manufacturers Try New Ways to Combat the Mess
white_goods  appliances  refrigeration 
february 2010 by jerryking
Appliance Anxiety - Replace It or Fix It? - NYTimes.com
By JULIE SCELFO
Published: May 27, 2009. To stay profitable, service companies book
multiple appointments on the same day, forcing consumers to sit home and
wait for hours. And because it would be impossible for technicians to
drive around with every possible replacement part, some repairs require a
follow-up visit that can be subject to the same inconveniences.
appliances  repairs  white_goods  home_appliances  inconveniences  after-sales_service 
june 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read