recentpopularlog in

jerryking : arbitrage   10

Where Value Lives in a Networked World
Mohanbir SawhneyDeval Parikh
FROM THE JANUARY 2001 ISSUE

In recent years, it seems as though the only constant in business has been upheaval...Business has become so complex that trying to predict what lies ahead is futile. Plotting strategy is a fool’s game. The best you can do is become as flexible and hope you’ll be able to ride out the disruption.
There’s some truth in that view…..We have studied the upheavals and concluded that many of them have a common root--the nature of intelligence in networks. The digitization of information, combined with advances in computing and communications, has fundamentally changed how all networks operate, human as well as technological, and that change is having profound consequences for the way work is done and value is created throughout the economy. Network intelligence is the Rosetta Stone. Being able to decipher it will shape the future of business.

Four Strategies for Profiting from Intelligence Migration

Arbitrage.
Because intelligence can be located anywhere on a network, there are often opportunities for moving particular types of intelligence to new regions or countries where the cost of maintaining the intelligence is lower. Such an arbitrage strategy is particularly useful for people-intensive services that can be delivered over a network, because labor costs tend to vary dramatically across geographies.

Aggregation.
As intelligence decouples, companies have the opportunity to combine formerly isolated pools of dedicated infrastructure intelligence into a large pool of shared infrastructure that can be provided over a network.

Rewiring.
The mobilization of intelligence allows organizations to more tightly coordinate processes with many participants. In essence, this strategy involves creating an information network that all participants connect to and establishing an information exchange standard that allows them to communicate.

Reassembly.
Another new kind of intermediary creates value by aggregating, reorganizing, and configuring disparate pieces of intelligence into coherent, personalized packages for customers.
arbitrage  centralization  collective_intelligence  decentralization  digitalization  disruption  flexibility  HBR  networks  network_power  resilience  taxonomy  turbulence  turmoil  uncertainty  value_creation 
november 2015 by jerryking
How Ubernomics can transform Canada’s legal diseconomy - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL MOTALA
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 10, 2015

Technologists from other industries hope Ubernomics is a generalizable business model. This month, the MaRS Discovery District launched LegalX, an industry cluster aimed at promoting local entrepreneurship, driving industry efficiency and pioneering new business models. One of its first startups is a service called LawScout. Like Uber, it offers a simple digital platform aimed at connecting small businesses with local lawyers on a fixed-rate basis. Beagle, another product launched at the event, performs rapid contract analysis using a sophisticated algorithm, while providing a platform for social media-inspired collaboration among decision-making teams....Ubernomics is not a panacea for the legal sector. Rather than disrupt it, it will transform. Big firms are here to stay if they embrace innovation. Digital technologies promise more efficient work flows and higher productivity. The shortcomings of the consensus-driven decision-making structure, exemplified by the fall of Heenan Blaikie, suggests more strategic thinking, stronger leadership and a heavier investment in R&D is needed to make legal work more efficient and cost effective......We live in an absurd legal diseconomy. There is an ever-widening gap between supply and unmet demand. Following the Ontario government's tuition deregulation in 1998, University of Toronto law led the charge, raising tuition by 320 per cent under dean Ron Daniels. Other law schools followed suit and continue to do so. This year, U of T law is unashamed to charge incoming students more than $30,000 a year. Not to be left out, the Law Society of Upper Canada recently doubled its licensing fees. The legal academy is aggravating the access to justice crisis by imposing ever-higher rents on the most vulnerable entrants to the profession. A false and parasitic empiricism has evidently burrowed itself in the minds of our country's greatest legal thinkers.

Ubernomics is not a panacea for the legal sector. Rather than disrupt it, it will transform. Big firms are here to stay if they embrace innovation. Digital technologies promise more efficient work flows and higher productivity. The shortcomings of the consensus-driven decision-making structure, exemplified by the fall of Heenan Blaikie, suggests more strategic thinking, stronger leadership and a heavier investment in R&D is needed to make legal work more efficient and cost effective.........
Businesses like fixed-cost projections. The billable-hour model introduces a lot of uncertainty into the equation. Software such as LawScout is unlikely to undermine the legal industry’s biggest players, but it signals that an economic culture shift lies ahead.
arbitrage  billing  contracts  digital_disruption  disruption  fees_&_commissions  invoicing  law  law_firms  law_schools  lawtech  legal  sharing_economy  start_ups  Uber  unmet_demand  uToronto 
july 2015 by jerryking
Why a Harvard Professor Has Mixed Feelings When Students Take Jobs in Finance - NYTimes.com
APRIL 10, 2015 | NYT | By SENDHIL MULLAINATHAN.

Every profession produces both private returns — the fruits of labor that a person enjoys — and social returns — those that society enjoys. If I set up a shop on Etsy selling photographs, my private returns may be defined as the revenue I generate. The social returns are the pleasure that my photographs provide to my customers....
career_paths  career  Wall_Street  students  economics  Harvard  Colleges_&_Universities  talent  rent-seeking  arbitrage  finance 
april 2015 by jerryking
My eBay MBA: a dozen business lessons from online auctions - FT.com
August 25, 2014 | FT | By Lucy Kellaway.
My eBay MBA: a dozen business lessons from online auctions.

1. Trust is vital . . .
2. Consumers are sometimes irrational
3 . . . and sometimes dead sensible
4. Jargon and hyperbole subtract value
5. Spelling matters
6. Accentuate warts
7. Arbitrage opportunities are plentiful
8. Do something you love
9. Study the data
10. The human touch is vital
11 Innovation is overrated
12. Tell stories
What they don’t teach you at eBay Business School . . .
. . . is how to network.
eBay  lessons_learned  Lucy_Kellaway  auctions  networking  overrated  trustworthiness  storytelling  irrationality  spelling  arbitrage  jargon  online_auctions 
august 2014 by jerryking
Incognito
October 2003 | Report on Business Magazine | by Doug Steiner.

"...He always seemed a step ahead, and he did it by working harder, thinking harder and trading harder—and in ways that the competition couldn't quite grasp."

Steiner's 10 rules for making serious money:

1. Economists say investing is a zero-sum game It isn't. Money moves to smart hands quickly, and lazy investors pay a price. Tiger Woods became the been golfer by practising a lot. How many prospectuses have you read in bed after the news?
2. Really good investors rarely crow. If there is $5 to be made from a trade, there will be loss than $2.50 after you've blabbed about how smart you are. There are traders who quietly take home $10 million a year. They live beside you in a modest house and drive a beat-up Nissan.
3. The best follow rules and they‘re patient. They may not invest for months. One great trader I know wanted to buy a house in a fancy neighbourhood. He spent more than a week in the registry office on his vacation, searching the title on each property in the neighbourhood to find what buyers paid and how much of that was mortgaged, going back 20 wars. He got a good deal. He does the same amount of homework investing.
4. Sharp traders never add to losing positions. Too many headaches.
5. Smart investors. when puzzled about when to sell. wonder if they should buy more. If they don’t think they should buy more,they sell.
6. The most information wins. If you like a company, phone some people who work there. Apply for a job. Try their products. Phone the shipping dock to find out if they're busy.
7. Get a Bloomberg terminal. Bloombergs have more information in them than you can use, but smart people use a lot of it.
8. Following really smart traders around the market is hard. Most have more money to invest in a position than the arbitrage or opportunity can handle. They leave few tracks.
9. Great investors an: like great athletes—they see opportunities that others don’t. Often you don't realize that what they've made the most money on is even fungible.
10. If you can't do it yourself, find someone who likes the foldouts in annual reports more than anything. Their management fees are usually worth it. And they usually don't have slick marketing brochures.
absorptive_capacity  arbitrage  Bay_Street  Bloomberg  dedication  Doug_Steiner  hard_work  hedge_funds  humility  idea_generation  investment_advice  investing  investors  money_management  obscurity  opportunities  overlooked_opportunities  patience  perception  primary_field_research  prospectuses  rules_of_the_game  self-discipline  sleuthing  slight_edge  smart_people  traders  training  unfair_advantages  zero-sum_games 
december 2013 by jerryking
Hedge funds in Texas: Stetsons and spreadsheets | The Economist
Jul 30th 2011 | The Economist | FOR a state more closely
associated with cattle and cowboys, Texas is home to a surprisingly big
herd of hedge funds. They manage around $40 billion, making Texas the
fifth-largest US state for hedge-fund assets (after NY, CT, MA and
CA),...Many Texans like to trace the industry’s vibrancy to the state’s
risk-taking traditions. ...More important than the idea that there is
something entrepreneurial in the water is the state’s tremendous wealth,
much of which comes from oil and gas. Around 10% of Americans worth
over $30m are in Texas, according to WealthX, which tracks rich
investors. The Bass brothers in Fort Worth were among the first to
invest in hedge funds—in the 1970s, after they inherited some of the
family fortune—and to bring talented managers down to run arbitrage
strategies. Texans today also prefer investing in trusted local
managers.
Texas  hedge_funds  asset_management  arbitrage  financial_services  investment_advice  oil_industry  Bass_brothers 
july 2011 by jerryking
WSJ: Galleon and the Trouble With Insider Trading
Jan/Feb 2010 | The Corporate Board | Andy Kessler.

Information now travels at the speed of light. The edge to human traders
is mostly gone, arbitraged out by fast computers.
Near-term blips in stocks will always be driven by those with industry
contacts, legal or illegal. The only way to truly beat the market long
term is to use your head, think out long-term trends, figure out where
productivity and therefore wealth is being created in the economy,
and invest alongside it. This might include investing in wireless commerce, gigabit broadband, personalized prescription drugs, oil shale extraction, or electric smart grids that can better allocate power to where it is needed.
**********************************************************************
[January 06, 2020 |WSJ| Tech Will Rule These ’20s, Too by Andy Kessler]
So what’s next? My fundamental rule for finding growth trends is that you need to see viable technologies today, and then predict which ones will get cheaper and better over time. Microprocessors, storage, bandwidth—all still going strong after half a century.
2020s  alpha  Andy_Kessler  arbitrage  beat_the_market  broadband  commoditization_of_information  hydraulic_fracturing  ideas  insider_trading  JCK  long-term  personalization  power_grid  productivity  productivity_payoffs  Raj_Rajaratnam  shale_oil  smart_grid  strategic_thinking  technology  traders  trends  trend_spotting  wealth_creation 
june 2011 by jerryking
Goldman Sachs Before the Storm - WSJ.com
Oct. 1, 2008 article by Liz Peek reviewing Charles D. Ellis' "The Partnership"

a company that, through well more than a century of investing and trading, has repeatedly found ways of reinventing itself, by exploiting the weakness of its rivals and by mastering new financial specialities -- e.g., block trading, corporate underwriting, commodities trading and arbitrage.
book_reviews  Goldman_Sachs  history  books  arbitrage  reinvention 
january 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read