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jerryking : architecture   49

The Trees and the Forest of New Towers - The New York Times
By Stephen Wallis
Nov. 20, 2019

Mass timber refers to prefabricated structural wood components that can be used to construct buildings — even large-scale buildings — faster, with less waste and eventually with less money........Mass timber refers to a variety of different types of engineered wood components, the most common being cross-laminated timber (known as CLT) and nail-laminated timber (or NLT), in which multiple layers of wood planks, stacked at 90 degrees, are glued or nailed together under pressure to form structural panels. So-called glulams, which are made in a similar fashion and have been around for more than a century, are typically used for long elements like beams and columns.........building with mass timber can ameliorate climate change because it produces less in greenhouse gas emissions than construction with concrete and steel. And wood has the benefit of storing the carbon dioxide trees absorb during their growth, keeping it out of the atmosphere indefinitely.....While cutting down trees to make buildings may not sound environmentally sensitive, mass timber supporters argue that wood could be harvested from sustainably managed forests...At the end of last year, the International Building Code was changed to allow wood buildings of up to 270 feet tall, or the equivalent of about 18 stories, from 85 feet....People want to live and work in these kinds of buildings — they have a sense of connection to the material,”......what we’ve seen from fabricators and builders is that there’s a 35 percent drop in construction time for mass-timber buildings, which means the carrying costs are less.”....
architecture  building_codes  climate_change  construction  design  emotional_connections  lumber  materials  skyscrapers  sustainability  Swatch  timber  wood_products  
november 2019 by jerryking
Da Vinci code: what the tech age can learn from Leonardo
April 26, 2019 | Financial Times | by Ian Goldin.

While Leonardo is recognised principally for his artistic genius, barely a dozen paintings can be unequivocally attributed to him. In life, he defined himself not as an artist but as an engineer and architect......History does not repeat itself, but it rhymes. The Renaissance catapulted Italy from the Medieval age to become the most advanced place on Earth. Then, as now, change brought immense riches to some and growing anxiety and disillusionment to others. We too live in an age of accelerating change, one that has provoked its own fierce backlash. What lessons can we draw from Leonardo and his time to ensure that we not only benefit from a new flourishing, but that progress will be sustained? When we think of the Renaissance, we think of Florence. Leonardo arrived in the city in the mid 1460s, and as a teenager was apprenticed to the painter Verrocchio. The city was already an incubator for ideas. At the centre of the European wool trade, by the late 14th century Florence had become the home of wealthy merchants including the Medicis, who were bankers to the Papal Court. The city’s rapid advances were associated with the information and ideas revolution that defines the Renaissance. Johann Gutenberg had used moveable type to publish his Bible in the early 1450s, and between the time of Leonardo’s birth in 1452 and his 20th birthday, some 15m books were printed, more than all the European scribes had produced over the previous 1,500 years.

..as Leonardo knew, and the Silicon Valley techno-evangelists too often neglect, information revolutions don’t only allow good ideas to flourish. They also provide a platform for dangerous ideas. The Zuckerberg information revolution can pose a similar threat to that of Gutenberg.

In the battle of ideas, populists are able to mobilise the disaffected more effectively than cerebral scientists, decently disciplined innovators and the moderate and often silent majority. For progress to prevail, evidence-based, innovative and reasoned thinking must triumph.
.....Genius thrived in the Renaissance because of the supportive ecosystem that aided the creation and dissemination of knowledge — which then was crushed by the fearful inquisitions. Today, tolerance and evidence-based argument are again under threat.
accelerated_lifecycles  architecture  broad-based_scientific_enquiry  capitalization  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  curiosity  dangerous_ideas  digital_economy  diversity  engineering  evidence_based  Florence  genius  globalization  human_potential  ideas  immigrants  Italy  industry_expertise  Johan_Gutenberg  lessons_learned  Leonardo_da_Vinci  Medicis  medieval  physical_place  polymaths  observations  Renaissance  Renaissance_Man  Silicon_Valley  silo_mentality  tolerance  unevenly_distributed  visionaries 
april 2019 by jerryking
How to build a better future: high-tech Jenga at the Soane Museum
December 21, 2018 | Financial Times | Simon Ings.

Suspended from four wires, this digitally controlled cable robot is building something out of hand-size wooden blocks. It’s a slow beast. Hours must pass before its construction becomes recognisable: a dome, of the sort that John Soane produced for the Bank of England and Dulwich Picture Gallery.

Polibot does not look like a game changer. But according to Arthur Mamou-Mani, whose architectural practice built it, Polibot’s children are going to change the world.......in the early 2000s, computer-generated design was a fairly dry topic. Patrik Schumacher, principal of Zaha Hadid Architects, dubbed it “parametricism”, reflecting the way programmes evolve forms according to a set of parameters........Through experiments in robotics, Mamou-Mani’s practice is out to develop new ways of building that will make architecture, engineering and construction merge into single field. The point is not what Polibot is, but what it could become. It’s not just a pick-and-place machine. It’s the early prototype of a universal builder.....There have been many experiments in the large-scale 3D printing of buildings. But the kinds of industrial robot arms that are usually employed for this work are far too cumbersome and delicate to wheel on to a building site....Gigantic robot arms will never spew out skyscrapers at a single sweep, Mamou-Mani says, for the simple reason that it would make construction less, not more efficient....construction is mostly about bringing big chunks of stuff together,” he says. “Currently, concrete is still the material of choice for the construction industry, but we’re slowly switching to timber, and this will be a massive revolution, because once you start working with timber, you’re no longer casting anything on site. You’re thinking entirely in terms of prefabrication and assembly.”Mamou-Mani dreams of building simple towers from elements (“prefabricated properly, by robotic arms, like cars”) assembled on site by gigantic Polibots....Mamou-Mani explains his vision of buildings that can expand and contract, depending on the economy....Why do we think that permanence is necessary?” Elsewhere in the show, the wall text proclaims that “the best cities are the ones that don’t leave ruins”....All great advances in industrial culture are prefigured by model-making.


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3-D  architecture  concrete  construction  design  models  model-making  museums  robotics  timber  howto 
december 2018 by jerryking
Thinking BIG: Danish architects have a radical vision to build a distinct condo community in Toronto - The Globe and Mail
ALEX BOZIKOVIC ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
COPENHAGEN
PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 12, 2018

The new condo will be hard to miss. It could be the strangest residential building ever constructed in Canada. Certainly, it will set an interesting example for new housing. While new condos and apartments are often faulted for being soulless, this promises to be a carefully detailed building, a distinctive place, and a village that contributes to the larger city.......the King Street project, by Westbank in partnership with Toronto office developers Allied Properties REIT. It was inspired by Moshe Safdie’s Habitat 67, the legendary assemblage of prefab boxes on Montreal’s harbour.......Like Habitat, the King Street building is configured as a series of “mountains,” irregular stacks of boxes that each contain a home or a piece of one. The residences rise up, over and around four century-old brick buildings, which will all be retained entirely or in large part......They are eminently livable. This is typical of BIG’s work, which tends to juxtapose fantastic ambition with business savvy and technical expertise.......BIG, and their clients, were ready to do something more thoughtful, but had no interest in blending in. After much back-and-forth, they’ve settled on glass block as the building’s main cladding material.....The King Street project is also an ambitious experiment with urban design. There are basically two species of tower in Toronto: a mid-rise slab of six to 10 storeys, which steps back at the top; and a “tower-and-podium,” a model borrowed from Vancouver that combines a fat, squared-off base (or “podium”) with a tall, skinny residential tower.
architecture  Danish  heritage  King_Street  livability  property_development  thinking_big  Toronto  condominiums  soul-enriching  housing 
september 2018 by jerryking
Towers of timber: Why wood is the future of architecture - The Globe and Mail
ALEX BOZIKOVIC ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
TORONTO AND MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
INCLUDES CORRECTION
PUBLISHED DECEMBER 15, 201
architecture  wood_products  timber 
august 2018 by jerryking
City of holes
23 April/24 April 2016 | Financial Times | by Edwin Heathcote
architecture  construction  London  cities  design 
april 2016 by jerryking
A Burglar’s Guide to the City
Ways of thinking/looking at the built environment. Consider "security architecture".

Studying architecture the way a burglar would, Geoff Manaugh takes readers through walls, down elevator shafts, into panic rooms, and out across the rooftops of an unsuspecting city.

At the core of A Burglar’s Guide to the City is an unexpected and thrilling insight: how any building transforms when seen through the eyes of someone hoping to break into it.

Encompassing nearly 2,000 years of heists and break-ins, the book draws on the expertise of reformed bank robbers, FBI Special Agents, private security consultants, the L.A.P.D. Air Support Division, and architects past and present.

Whether picking locks or climbing the walls of high-rise apartments, finding gaps in a museum’s surveillance routine or discussing home invasions in ancient Rome, A Burglar's Guide to the City ensures readers will never enter a bank again without imagining how to loot the vault or walk down the street without planning the perfect getaway.
Achilles’_heel  architecture  books  counterintuitive  dark_side  fresh_eyes  hacks  heists  mindsets  observations  pay_attention  security  security_consciousness 
april 2016 by jerryking
Ideas worth floating: architects adapt to rising sea levels - FT.com
March 4, 2016 |FT| Nicola Davison.

.....As authorities around the world scramble to build so-called “resiliency” to the rising sea, Dutch architects are providing guidance. “In the Netherlands we are living in a completely artificial world,” says Koen Olthuis, founder of Waterstudio.nl, a practice that specialises in “amphibious” architecture. “If you just drive round Holland, you don’t see it, but if you know where to look, it’s all levees. It’s like a machine and if you stopped pumping 24/7, the water would rise within weeks.”....Since 1900, however, the oceans have risen; the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) suggests that the average global sea level could rise more than a metre by 2100.

Higher seas mean Hurricane Sandy-like storm “surges” will hit coastal cities more frequently, while oceans will inundate low-lying areas from the Maldives to Miami. The OECD estimates that by 2070 $35tn worth of property in some of the world’s largest port cities will be at risk of flooding — though insurers will stop selling policies and banks will stop writing mortgages for seafront homes long before then.
The Netherlands began investing in water-resistant infrastructure...Dutch cities have also waterproofed. ...Rather than “fighting” the water with barriers and pumps, planners and architects are beginning to think cities should embrace the water....Climate scientists have different ideas about how quickly the sea around New York will rise, but rocks can be added to the breakwater to raise its height. Scape tries to build “flexible systems that can adapt”, says Elachi. “A lot of this is because we are designing for uncertainty.”
architecture  floods  sustainability  climate_change  Netherlands  resilience  adaptability  uncertainty  sea-level_rise 
april 2016 by jerryking
Design for disasters
November 14/5, 2015 | FT | Nicola Davison
Architects, he thinks, have as great a responsibility to people in disaster-prone regions as other professionals. It is not earthquakes themselves that kill ...
architecture  design  earthquakes  natural_calamities 
november 2015 by jerryking
LET'S REINVENT THE BOOKSHOP | More Intelligent Life
Rosanna de Lisle asks four firms of architects and designers to create the bookshop of their dreams

From INTELLIGENT LIFE magazine, May/June 2014
architecture  design  e-commerce  retailers  creativity  reinvention  bricks-and-mortar  booksellers  bookshops 
august 2015 by jerryking
Five things the TD Centre can teach us about how to build Toronto - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 01 2015,

The TD towers were a radical departure both in scale and in style. The tallest of the original two soared to 56 floors, dominating the skyline like nothing before or since. Rising from its six-acre site at King and Bay, it was everything the old buildings around it were not. While they featured arched windows and gargoyles, Greek columns and bronze roofs, the design of the TD Centre was all austerity and simplicity.

It is just this sort of future that the creators of the TD Centre had in mind when they hired one of the era’s most renowned architects to build them something outstanding. The architect was Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), the Chicago-based German émigré who liked to say that “less is more.” He referred to his works as “skin-and-bones” architecture, and his unadorned steel-and-glass boxes were meant to reflect the spirit of a modern technological era.

It took ambition and foresight to pull off something as bold as the TD Centre. It meant thinking about what the city would become instead of just coping with what it was. Those qualities sometimes seem lacking in today’s Toronto. There are still things we can learn from those dark towers.

First, don’t be afraid of tall buildings.
Second, investing in quality pays.
Third, maintain what you have.
Fourth, pay attention to details.
Finally, always think about the future. Toronto, and Canada, were in a risk-taking frame of mind when the first tower took shape. Expo 67, the wildly successful world’s fair, was under way in Montreal. The striking new Toronto City Hall by Finnish architect Viljo Revell had opened two years earlier.
'60s  ambitions  architecture  boldness  foresight  history  lessons_learned  Marcus_Gee  skyscrapers  Bay_Street  TD_Bank  Toronto  design  forward_looking  PATH  detail_oriented  minimalism  quality  Expo_67  risk-taking  mindsets  pay_attention 
may 2015 by jerryking
Hidden landmarks: Why Toronto is at the forefront of the landscape architecture movement - The Globe and Mail
May. 01 2015 | The Globe and Mail | ALEX BOZIKOVIC.

The history of Toronto's University Avenue: The landscape designer André Parmentier planted the avenue in 1829; it was reshaped in the 1920s in the Beaux-Arts style; and in the 1960s, the current landscape was designed by the British-born architect Howard Dunington-Grubb to cap the newly built subway. It includes perennials, statues and vent stacks.

What is clear to Mr. Birnbaum – a century and a half of design ideas – is invisible to most of us, part of the scenery. That is the plight of landscape architecture, and this is what Mr. Birnbaum’s group is hoping to change: to make familiar the idea of a “cultural landscape” as something to be seen, valued and protected by the general public. As he puts it, “We’re making visible the often-invisible hand of the landscape architect.”

What exactly is a “cultural landscape”? It can be a street or a waterfront, designed or inherited. But most often it means a designed outdoor space, the work of landscape architects who deal with urban and ecological lenses, as well as vegetation and the formal design of plazas, streets and other outdoor spaces...Waterfront Toronto: In remaking 800 hectares of the industrial waterfront, that agency has brought together some of the best landscape architects in the world to remake the topography and to set a high standard for the urban fabric it is building....Parks matter! Parks generate real-estate value and, more importantly, a sense of place. As Mr. Birnbaum points out, the waterfront parks “were built first, communicating what the quality of life will be along the waterfront. We think it sets an enviable standard, and that’s why we will be bringing people from all over the globe to see the landscapes and to discuss these issues.”
Toronto  landmarks  landscapes  architecture  design  parks  waterfronts  Waterfront_Toronto  history  public_spaces  quality_of_life 
may 2015 by jerryking
Hidden language of the streets - FT.com
March 6, 2015 | FT| Edwin Heathcote.

Each city has its own visual and filmic shorthand for its streetscape (should read "cityscape"). There are the monuments — the Eiffel Tower, Big Ben, the Empire State Building and so on, but at street level there are markers of urban identity as potent as the great monuments and which, in fact, have a far more meaningful impact on everyday life, as the fragments that form the backdrop against which we live our public lives.
...Street furniture and the in-between architecture that populates the pavements defines the experience of walking through the city. ...Streets and their furniture are designed for an ideal public but they can also be vehicles of control....The question is, what kind of meaning does our contemporary streetscape communicate? Throughout the history of public space, urban markers have been used to convey a sense of place, of centre, connection and of context. ....Then there is a rich layer of what we might call in-between architecture, the market stalls, newsstands, food carts and hot-dog stands, caramelised-nut vendors and seafood stalls. To a large extent these are among the elements that make up the experience of the city yet they are rarely regarded as architecture. Instead they represent an ad-hoc series of developments that have evolved to an optimum efficiency....This layer expresses the story of the desires, the fears, the entrepreneurialism and the attitude to privacy of a city. But the most intriguing thing is that it is simultaneously an expression of the top-down and the bottom-up city.
cities  design  identity  architecture  public_spaces  furniture  cityscapes  iconic  top-down  bottom-up  street_furniture  streetscapes  overlay_networks  streets  landmarks  shorthand 
march 2015 by jerryking
Explore Toronto’s libraries, one illustration at a time - The Globe and Mail
SEAN LILLANI
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 13 2015,

Daniel Rotsztain’s prints are available at allthelibraries.ca/prints.
TPL  libraries  art  artists  architecture  Toronto 
february 2015 by jerryking
Architect David Adjaye's World View - WSJ.com
By Ian Volner
Nov. 6, 2013 | WSJ |

Profile of David Adjaye:
The promise of those first projects attracted major institutional commissions—including the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo in 2005, and Denver's Museum of Contemporary Art two years later—but it was the 2008 economic crisis that obliged Adjaye to look still further afield and set up satellite offices in Germany and the U.S. "The catalyst for us was the downturn," says Adjaye. "We had to undergo a total restructuring. Basically we had to go big or go home."
architecture  Africa  innovation  design  Ghanaian  Nobel_Prizes  museums  art  cosmopolitan  contemporary_art  David_Adjaye 
november 2013 by jerryking
Facebook Plays It Safe - NYTimes.com
August 31, 2012, 9:00 pm75 Comments
Facebook Plays It Safe
By ALLISON ARIEFF
Facebook  architecture  playing_it_safe 
september 2012 by jerryking
Meet the man who shaped 20th-century Toronto - The Globe and Mail
JOHN LORINC
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 18, 2012

Rowland Caldwell Harris – who began a 33-year term as works commissioner a century ago this week – left his civic fingerprints all over Toronto, building hundreds of kilometres of sidewalks, sewers, paved roads, streetcar tracks, public baths and washrooms, landmark bridges and even the precursor plans to the GO commuter rail network.

“The significance of Harris a hundred years later is that we’re still living fundamentally in the city he imagined,” observes Dalhousie architecture professor Steven Mannell, who studies his career and has advised city officials on an extensive rehabilitation of the R.C. Harris Water Treatment Plant, due to be finished next year.

Mr. Harris famously added a second deck to the Prince Edward Viaduct in anticipation of a subway line that wasn’t built for decades. What’s less well known is that Mr. Harris was a photo buff who, in 1930, presided over the city’s first planning exercise – a process that led to construction of congestion-easing arterials such as Dundas Street East and the parkway extension of Mount Pleasant through Rosedale and up towards St. Clair.
John_Lorinc  Toronto  trailblazers  R.C._Harris  architecture  wastewater-treatment  infrastructure  municipalities  urban  urban_planning  landmarks  bridges  foresight  imagination  TTC  '30s  city_builders 
may 2012 by jerryking
The business case for beautiful libraries - The Globe and Mail
LISA ROCHON | Columnist profile | E-mail
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 10, 2012
culture  libraries  planning  case_studies  Lisa_Rochon  architecture 
february 2012 by jerryking
Homegrown designers plant global roots
August 25, 2011 | | RICHARD FOOT,Special to The Globe and Mail
Send to Kellie
international_marketing  globalization  landscapes  architecture 
november 2011 by jerryking
How art’s vision heals when eyesight fails - The Globe and Mail
Russell Smith: On Culture
How art’s vision heals when eyesight fails
From Thursday's Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011

One. Architecture aids healing.
Two. There is not much entertainment for the sightless
Three. I call bullcrap on audio books.
Russell_Smith  art  architecture  blindness 
november 2011 by jerryking
The Grand ManhattanEntrances of 'Mad Men' - WSJ.com
JULY 21, 2010 Wall Street Journal | By MARC MYERS. The
Impeccably Crafted Style of 'Mad Men' Isn't All a Thing of the Past. You
Can Find It in These Landmarks of 1960s Design.
Mad_Men  New_York_City  '60s  architecture  commercial_real_estate  design 
july 2010 by jerryking
King's College Chapel, Cambridge, England | Masterpiece by Julia Vitullo-Martin - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 19, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by JULIA
VITULLO-MARTIN. King's College Chapel in Cambridge, England, is the
product of an extraordinary combination of royal commitment, turbulent
religious politics, violent civil wars, vicious labor disputes, superb
medieval craftsmanship, and engineering that has never been replicated
and is still not fully understood today. The historian Francis Woodman,
author of "The Architectural History of King's College Chapel," calls it
"the English building of the late Middle Ages, every element capturing
the artistic and political revolution of its time."
architecture  Cambridge  churches  history  medieval  Middle_Ages  United_Kingdom 
january 2010 by jerryking
Miracles of Resurrection
May 29, 2007 | Wall Street Journal| Joanne Kauffman
Retrospective by Donald Samick, head of J & R Lamb Studios, the
oldest continuously operating ecclesiastical art and stained glass
concern in the U.S. Lam was 150 yrs old in 2007.
preservation  History  design  architecture  restorations  Joanne_Kauffman  glass 
april 2009 by jerryking

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