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jerryking : arenas   9

Ticketmaster’s New Challenger: Your Face - WSJ
By Anne Steele
Updated May 4, 2018

The industry is ripe for disruption. People are spending more than ever on experiences, even as concern is rising about security at crowded live events. At the same time, artists and teams today have little control over how, to whom or for how much their tickets are sold.
entrepreneur  start_ups  disruption  Live_Nation  live_performances  facial-recognition  sports  arenas  Ticketmaster  Rival  Andreessen_Horowitz 
may 2018 by jerryking
Toronto's Air Canada Centre to be renamed Scotiabank Arena in $800-million deal
August 29, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY ROBERTSON , JAMES BRADSHAW AND JEFF GRAY.

Toronto's Air Canada Centre (ACC) is being renamed Scotiabank Arena in an $800-million deal over 20 years that marks one of the biggest investments in naming rights in North America.

The agreement announced on Tuesday by Bank of Nova Scotia and Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment Ltd. (MLSE) is 10 times the annual $4-million Air Canada paid to attach its name to the home of the Toronto Maple Leafs, the Toronto Raptors and a number of A-list concerts and other events. Other recent naming deals for coveted sports venues in the United States have gone for significantly less. Last year, the NBA's Golden State Warriors agreed to name its new arena the Chase Centre, in a deal with JPMorgan Chase estimated at more than $300-million (U.S.) for 20 years, the largest at the time.

The play is Scotiabank's latest move to market itself as "Canada's hockey bank." Scotiabank sponsors community hockey clubs across the country, all seven Canadian NHL teams, and is the official bank of the NHL. To allow another company or even another bank to take top billing at one of Canada's premier venues would be to risk giving up Scotiabank's dominant position as a sponsor of hockey in Canada......The deal is also a representation of a boom in sponsorship spending in general, as marketers struggle to find new ways to reach consumers in an increasingly cluttered media environment.

Companies spent $1.98-billion on sponsorship fees in Canada last year, according to the most recent Canadian Sponsorship Landscape Study, conducted by Ohio University professor Norm O'Reilly in association with sports marketing firm T1. And "activations" that make people aware of those sponsorships, such as advertising, promotions and events, accounted for roughly another $1-billion. Those numbers have doubled in the past 10 years, according to the research.

Such deals are particularly important for what's known as "earned media" exposure – as opposed to "paid media" such as ads – because they mean that the sponsor's brand is baked in to coverage of everything happening at the venue. Media include the name in their coverage of teams and big-ticket matches; the brand appears in TV images of major events through permanent ads in and around the venues; on digital properties associated with bookings there; and the buildings themselves act as giant billboards. Contrast that with a media environment in which consumers are bombarded with digital, outdoor, print and broadcast ads, seemingly at every turn......MLSE will also benefit from Scotiabank's efforts to use digital and mobile technologies to communicate with the bank's customers – using its insights to connect to fans both at the rink and watching at home, Mr. Hopkinson said. The bank can also give MLSE access to its analytics team to assist in crunching large sets of data to better understand hockey fans, Mr. Doig said, and the deal will give MLSE a window into Scotiabank's Scene loyalty program, which has more than eight million members. Many of those are young people that the NHL has an interest in courting as future fans.
10x  Susan_Krashinsky  Jeff_Gray  MLSE  sports  naming  Scotiabank  Bay_Street  sponsorships  arenas  earned_media  paid_media 
august 2017 by jerryking
Oak View Group – We are here to be a positive disruption to business as usual in the sports and live entertainment industry.
Messrs. Irving Azoff and Tim Leiweke could use conferences to help Oak View Group, their venue-management company, which collects annual fees from about two dozen arenas in exchange for sponsorships, event booking and other services.
disruption  back-office  sports  live_performances  sponsorships  events  arenas  Tim_Leiweke  entertainment_industry 
april 2017 by jerryking
Stadiums race to digitize: How sports teams are scrambling to keep Millennials coming to games - TechRepublic
There are three reasons that stadiums are pushing to improve connectivity:

1. Changing demographics
2. Luring fans away from their big-screen TV at home
3. Boosting revenues

Whether by building from scratch or retrofitting existing facilities, stadiums are in a fierce competition with each other to add the latest technologies.
millennials  sports  LBMA  technology  stadiums  arenas 
may 2016 by jerryking
Businesses Are Turning to Beacons, and It’s Going to Be O.K. - NYTimes.com
OCT. 15, 2014 |NYT | Molly Wood.

The point of the devices is to send a specific signal, using low-energy Bluetooth, to phones that come into proximity, as long as those phones are running apps that can respond to the beacon. Those codes then set off an action on the phone, like a coupon, a reminder, a reward or just information. A beacon at the gates of a baseball stadium could open a map to the user’s seat and offer a beer or hot dog coupon.
sensors  beacons  location_based_services  advertising  mobile_applications  Bluetooth  digital_footprints  proximity  stadiums  arenas  mapping  wayfinding 
october 2014 by jerryking
A high-tech sports revolution
Jan. 09, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | by Stephen Brunt. The
boomers and their buying power are heading toward the sunset, and the
talk in the sports business now is about how to attract and hold a
different generation, with a different, diminished attention span,
accustomed to having the whole world laid out for them, every minute of
every day, literally at their fingertips.

Getting them out of their homes and into the building or into the
ballpark, getting their eyes to linger for more than a few seconds as a
game flickers across a screen – not to mention the advertising that pays
the freight – has become the core challenge.
sports  consumption  Stephen_Brunt  revolution  arenas  future  challenges  LBMA  sports_marketing  baby_boomers  millennials  attention  advertising  buying_power  stadiums  attention_spans 
january 2010 by jerryking

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