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jerryking : assets   18

The death of cultural transmission
April 3, 2019 | FT Alphaville | By Jamie Powell.

music publishing = the business of licensing songs for films, television and advertising.

Valuing [a record label's] music catalogue is... crucial for anyone looking to bid for a stake in the business.

Despite the prominence of new music, established artists are still fundamental to recorded music's success. .......So let's think about these golden oldies as assets. Assets whose appeal has, arguably, only been heightened by the advent of streaming which, with its recurring revenues and growing audience, has made recurring payments from established acts even more bond-like in their cash flow consistency.
But like fixed-income assets with long durations, these cash flows are also sensitive to the smallest assumptions about their future viability. Assumptions which are not as rock solid as some investors might imagine. Let's use The Beatles as a point of reference here, as "The White Album" was UMG's fourth best-selling album last year. (If you're asking “why The Beatles?” Well, Alphaville likes The Beatles, sure. The Fab Four could easily be replaced by its other legacy acts, such as Queen and Nirvana).

But the problem for a prospective buyer is why we're a fan. To put it simply: we had no choice. We were indoctrinated.

On a long car journeys to coastal summer holidays, or at home on a knackered JVC stereo, we, like many of our friends, were limited to a dozen or so records (jk: finite resources). One of which, inevitably, would be some form of John, Paul, George and Ringo (and George).

Call it the cultural transmission effect. Music would be passed on generation to generation, amplified by the relative scarcity, physical space constraints and high prices of recorded media.

This provided a boon for the major labels as it not only meant lower marketing costs but reissues, limited editions, and remasters became an easily repeatable trick, as younger generations grew up to become consumers themselves.......The Beatles, Rolling Stones and Bob Marley are after all, great artists. Their music will live on. But that's not the question for a perspective investor.

The question is: to what degree will the royalties from these artists continue to flow? Assume Sir Paul and Sir Ringo will continue to grow exponentially richer off the back of streaming, and perhaps the quoted multiples don't look quite so mad. In this age it's hard to find assets which both grow, and have semi-predictable cash flows.

But if the next generation doesn't hold the same affinity to the artists which defined the first fifty years of the pop era, where does that leave the labels' back catalogues? May we suggest: in a tougher spot than most imagine.
Apple_Music  artists  assets  Beatles  biopics  bonds  cultural_transmission  digital_strategies  finance  finite_resources  golden_oldies  hard_to_find  indoctrination  legacy_artists  music  music_catalogues  music_labels  music_publishing  platforms  Rollingstones  royalties  Spotify  strategic_buyers  streaming  superstars  U2  UMG  valuations 
april 2019 by jerryking
5 Ways to Value Your Collection, Whether It’s Fine Wine or Shrunken Heads
March 1, 2019 | The New York Times | By Paul Sullivan.

Collectible assets include wine, spirits, coins, trading cards as well as more unusual items, like lighters, belt buckles and even shrunken heads. These collections cost money and time to assemble and certainly have a value to their owners, but can they be considered legitimate investments? That depends on the market.

For many collectors, the only option to buy, sell or even value these assets is through online auction platforms like eBay or enthusiast sites, but for others, their possessions are treated as fine art.......the market for collectibles, which are often valued in the millions of dollars, may not always be so easy to weather. It can experience sudden surges that put desired items out of the reach of true collectors or it can collapse, wiping out the gains speculators thought they had made.

In an economic slowdown, how these investments are treated depends on supply and demand as well as unpredictable forces like fashion and popularity.....Collectibles can be broken into categories determined by provenance, rarity and even a moment in time. Here are five issues to consider when weighing the investment potential of your collection.....
(1) The standouts in the crowd - Leading the pack are high-quality items that have broad name recognition.
(2) High risk, high reward -
(3) Not all collectibles are investments- jewelry is not an investment....because the market is driven too much by changing fashion.
(4) Obscure and difficult to sell - establish the value of esoteric collections by using third-party appraisers. But insurance companies like A.I.G. value these collections by their replacement value, not by the price someone would pay for them.
(5) A market downturn - =hether it’s shrunken heads, 1,000 bottles of wine or sheets of trading cards, a ready buyer may not be available — or may want to pay much less (i.e. a step change in the valuation).
collectibles  collectors  high-risk  howto  obscure  valuations  AIG  auctions  assets  brands  eBay  economic_downturn  esoteric  fine_arts  high-end  high-quality  investing  investments  passions  step_change  unpredictability  wine  whisky  online_auctions 
march 2019 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: Before you raise money (assets and expenses)
Here's the key thing you have to understand before you ask your mom or your friends or the local VC for an investment:

There's a huge difference between spending money on expenses and spending money to build an asset.

Ice at a picnic is an expense. Once it melts, it's gone. Your electric bill, rent--these are costs of doing business, and you should rarely if ever borrow money to pay them.

Assets, on the other hand, are things that sustain or grow in value, that you can use again and again, and that are ultimately worth more than they cost.

A college degree from the right institution is an asset. So is an earned list of 10,000 people who want to hear from you by email once a week. So is a reputation (which some people call a brand).

For entrepreneurs, then, the math is simple: any asset-building opportunity that will generate a long-term profit is worth considering and even worth borrowing money to acquire.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The reason for this money trap is that so many small-business owners confuse raising money for expenses with raising money to build an asset. This is worth understanding.

If you can say, "I will spend this money on X, and X will make Y happen, and Y will pay off handsomely," then a professional investor ought to be open to hearing that story.

But the things to spend money on are a significant real estate presence, machines, patents, a permanent, expensive brand. The entrepreneur who spends this money does it with enthusiasm, because she's buying things that are going to grow in value, fast.

This is the painting contractor who realizes that a high-powered industrial paint booth will make him the only guy in town who can do a certain kind of job. Or the fast food impresario who asserts that opening ten restaurants in one town in one year will give her the footprint to be more efficient and profitable.
funding  assets  Seth_Godin  expenses  financing 
may 2017 by jerryking
Emerging markets offer clue for investors in 2017
December 31/January 1 2017 | Financial Times | by Gillian Tett.

Now (people = politicians = capriciousness/alternatively, unpredictable waves of populism) are shaping events, not established party platforms or policy programmes....the pricing of political uncertainty has moved from being an emerging market phenomenon to an emerged market issue....Is there any way for investors to adapt to this new world? ....(1) Start by abandoning the idea that asset values can be predicted by using neat economic models alone. ...investors urgently need to think about the difference between "risk" (i.e. events that can be predicted with a certain probability) and "uncertainty" (i.e. unknown future shocks). Until now, investors in developed markets have tended to focus primarily on risks and assume that these can be priced (and hedged against). But 2017 is likely to produce uncertainty. That cannot be easily priced or hedge--and investors should recognize this. (2) Investor should also embrace "optionality": the only way to prepare for a world of uncertainty is to stay as flexible and diversified as possible. Now is not the time for investors to put all their eggs in one basket, or bet on just one asset class. Nor is it time for businesses to be locked into rigid business plans: political and geopolitical upheaval could strike almost anywhere. (3) If 2017 does deliver more risk and uncertainty, expect financial markets to be "skittish" about "news" of all types, and not just economic....Bad news for those who despise market volatility (expectation: we're in for volatility like we've never seen before)....Uncertainty can deliver huge opportunity alongside risks..."good" surprises....Surviving 2017 in the developed economies requires that investors use tools beyond those found in the realm of economics: psychology, sociology and political science. Also, talk to successful emerging market investors to find out how they practice their craft.
concentration_risk  Gillian_Tett  emerging_markets  political_risk  unpredictability  Brexit  investors  Donald_Trump  uncertainty  risks  optionality  geopolitics  financial_markets  politicians  volatility  tools  economics  psychology  sociology  political_science  FT  institutions  rule_of_law  Gary_Cohn  populism  indicators  human_factor  assets  asset_values  asset_classes  diversification  dislocations  bad_news 
january 2017 by jerryking
Network orchestrators are the new path to profit - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 03, 2016 | Special to The Globe and Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER

* "The Network Imperative" by authors Barry Libert, Megan Beck, and Jerry Wind.

Technology - Shift from physical to digital. Develop a digitally enabled platform around which people can congregate.

Assets - Shift from tangible to intangible assets. Physical assets are becoming a liability. Pay attention to your brand, a key intangible asset, and also view people as an asset, not an expense.

Strategy -move from operator to allocator. As a strategist, Mr. Libert has spent many years working with leaders to figure out what products to sell to what market. But these days, leaders should be active allocators of capital, like portfolio managers.

Leadership - The shift here is from commander – in charge of a highly structured, hierarchical, top-down organization – to co-creator, who knows how to motivate, inspire and work alongside others to develop the network.

Boards - His favourite shift, because it is the most difficult, is the switch from governance to representation.
Finally, the mindset must change to thinking less rigidly about roles, processes, products and industries.
assets  atoms_&_bits  books  business_models  capital_allocation  co-creation  eBay  Etsy  flexibility  Harvey_Schachter  intangibles  mindsets  networks  orchestration  pay_attention  platforms  portfolio_management  physical_assets  resource_allocation 
july 2016 by jerryking
Patterns of Deconstruction: Layer Mastery
JANUARY 01, 1999 | bcg.perspectives |by David Edelman.

In order to exist as a layer, a product or activity supplied by a single company must be a key input to one or many value chains, while also being modular enough to stand on its own as an independent business.
So, the first step in achieving layer mastery is to identify whether any assets or capabilities that have traditionally been part of your proprietary product definition or process expertise may represent the kernel of a new layer business. Often, the asset or capability you have been protecting most carefully is precisely the thing you should be selling to as many players as possible—competitors included—in an effort to create a branded industry standard.

Is the Layer Worth Mastering?

Not all are. Deconstruction de-averages the economics of a business. Some layers are naturally fragmented, leading to stalemate. Other layers, however, can be highly scale sensitive, leading to winner-takes-all competitive dynamics.
For instance, as deconstruction separates physical activities from informational ones, a new information-based scale is emerging. In layers governed by this information scale, network effects create ever increasing value for customers as more of them use the layer—a powerful economic logic for the existence of a dominant competitor.
BCG  layer_mastery  deconstruction  core_competencies  winner-take-all  physical_activities  value_chains  scaling  assets  capabilities  network_effects  kernels  informational_activities 
april 2015 by jerryking
The 9 Characteristics Of A Strong Brand:
October 26, 2008 | Branding Strategy Insider| Posted by Martin Roll.
1. A brand drives shareholder value
2. The brand is led by the boardroom and managed by brand marketers with an active buy-in from all stakeholders
3. The brand is a fully integrated part of the entire organisation aligned around multiple touch points
4. The brand can be valued in financial terms and must reside on the asset side of the balance sheet
5. The brand can used as collateral for financial loans and can be bought and sold as an asset
6. Customers are willing to pay a substantial and consistent price premium for the brand versus a competing product and service
7. Customers associate themselves strongly with the brand, its attributes, values and personality, and they fully buy into the concept which is often characterized by a very emotional and intangible relationship (higher customer loyalty)
8. Customers are loyal to the brand and would actively seek it and buy it despite several other reasonable and often cheaper options available (higher customer retention rate)
9. A brand is a trademark and marquee (logo, shape, colour etc) which is fiercely and pro-actively protected by the company and its legal advisors
brand_purpose  brands  branding  ksfs  large_companies  Fortune_500  emotional_connections  goodwill  customer_loyalty  brand_equity  boards_&_directors_&_governance  logos  trademarks  intangibles  shareholder_value  assets  collateral 
november 2012 by jerryking
Let strategic assets go forth and prosper
Feb. 16, 2011 | The Globe and Mail| Editorial TMX Group Inc. is
in a sense a strategic asset for Canada, as some people are saying, but
that is all the more reason why it should be free to expand its scope
and compete beyond Canada by merging with London Stock Exchange Group
PLC, giving Canadian issuers and investors wider opportunities. The
adjective “strategic” should not be a synonym for “to be
protected.”....Good strategy is outward-looking, not merely defensive.
TMX should be entitled to pursue its hypothesis that a transatlantic
alliance would make it, more than before, a strategic asset for
Canadians.
stockmarkets  LSE  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  TSX  editorials  TMX  assets  strategy  transatlantic  alliances  outward_looking 
february 2011 by jerryking
Facing Budget Gaps, Cities Sell Parking, Airports, Zoos, Other Assets - WSJ.com
AUGUST 23, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By IANTHE JEANNE DUGAN.

The privatization trend is being spurred by a cottage industry of consultants, lawyers and bankers. Allen & Overy, a New York law firm, dubs it "rescue investing" and recently provided investors a booklet on "jurisdictions of opportunity"—municipalities whose laws, budget woes and credit ratings make them most likely to make deals [jk: unexploited_resources ].

"More public-private partnerships for public infrastructure in the U.S. have reached commercial and financial close than during any comparable period in U.S. history," the booklet says.
airports  assets  austerity  cities  cottage_industries  cutbacks  deal-making  dealmakers  divestitures  entrepreneurial  fallen_angels  infrastructure  investors  law_firms  lawyers  municipalities  opportunities  opportunistic  parking_lots  pitches  PPP  privatization  prospectuses  rescue_investing  unexploited_resources  vulture_investing 
august 2010 by jerryking
Using data to enhance customer experience
: January 24, 2006 | FT.com | By Ian Limbach. "“Call
centres are often seen as a way to manage costs rather than enhancing
the quality of [customer] service,” warns Wes Hayden, CEO of Alcatel’s
Genesys subsidiary. This has discouraged investments in new technology
and led management to measure efficiency with metrics such as throughput
and call duration, rather than customer-centric measures. “There needs
to be a change in C-level executives’ view of call centres,” he says.
This narrow focus has led to call centres being one of the most
under-used corporate assets today, says McKinsey. Beyond fielding
customer complaints, the call centre should be closely integrated with
other company functions such as sales & marketing.

Some leading companies are focusing on ways to turn calls from customers
into new selling opportunities, and finding that callers are more
receptive to buying after a positive service experience than they are
when reached by outbound telemarketing campaigns. "
call_centres  contact_centres  customer_experience  McKinsey  customer_centricity  CRM  data  upselling  cross-selling  unstructured_data  churn  predictive_modeling  metrics  mismanagement  underutilization  assets  cost_centers  C-suite 
august 2010 by jerryking
Letters to the Editor: Spotting Bubbles in the Economy Isn’t Hard, but Deflating Them Is - WSJ.com
AUGUST 2, 2009 | Wall Street Journal..."More important than
appointing and paying someone to identify risks which are already being
identified is the need to have the political will to do something about
them when they are identified and, more importantly, to have the wisdom
to know which ones are going to become problems and which ones aren’t.
Systemic risks that cause major disruptions are only identified in
hindsight."..."Systemic risk is not created by assets increasing in
value—that’s good news. The risk is that asset values increase because
of excessive debt growth. Bubble watching is then simply a matter of
defining a speed limit for debt growth."
letters_to_the_editor  bubbles  Alan_Greenspan  systemic_risks  debt  political_will  assets  asset_values  wisdom  hindsight 
august 2010 by jerryking
The New Phrase for Indulgence: ‘Passionate Investing’ - The Wealth Report - WSJ
* May 17, 2010, 11:47 By Robert Frank

“Wealthy individuals still have money but now they are combining investment with improving the quality of their lives through investing in assets with which they have emotional attachments,” says Susan Ellis, financial analyst at Datamonitor. “It is a way to invest and spend simultaneously while adding to the richness of their lives,” she says.

She adds that the wealthy are seeking “safe havens” that they can also enjoy, like jewelry and art.

She concedes that “the line between investment in tangibles and luxury expenditure can sometimes be blurred, particularly in a period of market uncertainty.” Yet she says the jump in some luxury sales is owed in part to “passionate investing.”

I agree that some of the the wealthy, having watched their millions or more disappear in 2008, would much rather lose money on things they can drink, drive or wear. But I’m not sure they see it as “investing.” To them, it could be a more simple matter of spending being far more enjoyable than losing an equivalent amount in the markets.
high_net_worth  Robert_Frank  passions  assets  emotional_commitment  emotional_connections  investors 
may 2010 by jerryking
Wealthy Investors Discover Timberland - WSJ.com
MAY 1, 2010 |WSJ| By JEFF OPDYKE.

*********************************************************************
https://www.landthink.com/timberland-is-for-small-investors-as-well-as-large/
*********************************************************************
The timber business as an asset class makes sense only for ultrawealthy, ultralong-term
investors.Timber isn't lumber, the commodity that trades as relatively
short-term futures contracts. Timberland is the farm from which lumber
ultimately comes, and is a long-term holding.Think decades.Timberland
investing works best at scale = a difficult investment for people of
lesser means.Small plots lack the muscle to generate meaningful income,
since only a fraction of the trees are culled at any one time.The avg.
timber tract is = 400 acres in the Southeast, the US 's wood basket.At
roughly $2k/acre, that's an $800k ante just to play.

Wealthy individual investors typically put their money in timber
investment-management organizations, or TIMOs, which cater largely to
institutions, but which often accept individuals investing a minimum of
between $1 million to $5 million. Some TIMOs do allow individuals to
pool money into a single account to meet the minimum.
assets  asset_classes  economies_of_scale  farming  forestry  high_net_worth  illiquidity  investors  long-term  lumber  timber 
may 2010 by jerryking
Googling Growth - WSJ.com
APRIL 9, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | by CHRIS ZOOK. Rapid
shifts in markets and technologies are forcing companies of all sorts to
change direction faster than ever. Many management teams are tempted
by "big bang" solutions: dramatic, transformative mergers or aggressive
leaps into sexy new markets. The success rate for major, life-changing
mergers is only about one in 10. For most companies, reinvention of a
core business doesn't have to involve such high levels of risk. The
solution lies in mining hidden assets -- assets already possessed but
not being tapped for maximum growth potential.
One way to open management's eyes to hidden assets is to identify the
richest hunting grounds, usually camouflaged as hidden business
platforms, untapped customer insights, and underused capabilities.
accelerated_lifecycles  Apple  assets  Bain  big_bang  business_models  Chris_Zook  core_businesses  customer_insights  GE  growth  hidden  high-risk  iPODs  latent  life-changing  M&A  mergers_&_acquisitions  moonshots  Nestlé  Novozymes  rapid_change  reinvention  resource_management  Samsung  success_rates  transformational  underutilization 
february 2010 by jerryking
globeandmail.com - Corporate survival: Be ready to chart a new course when industry winds blow
Oct. 1, 2007 G&M column by Harvey Schachter on Anita
McGahan's suggestions on how to interpret the signals of industry
change.

Determine whether your core activities or core assets are threatened - or both. Core activities are those actions that have historically generated profits for the industry, such as owning dealerships in the auto industry, which is less significant in an Internet era. Core assets are the resources, knowledge, and brand capital that have made the organization unique, like blockbuster drugs in the pharmaceutical industry.

(1) Radical Change.our core activities and core assets are both threatened with obsolescence. This is similar to the concept of disruptive change outlined by Harvard's Clayton Christensen in his writings.

(2) Intermediating Change. Core activities are threatened while core assets retain their strength. Sotheby's, for example, remains top notch at assessing works of art but because of technology eBay can challenge on the matchmaking side of the business.

(3) Creative Change. Core assets are under threat but core activities remain stable, as in pharmaceuticals or oil and gas exploration, where relationships with customers and suppliers are fairly steady but assets turn over constantly. Innovation occurs in fits and starts.

(4) Progressive Change. Both core assets and core activities are stable, but significant change still threatens, as in discount retailing, long-haul trucking, and commercial airlines.
assets  Clayton_Christensen  Harvey_Schachter  strategy  industries  structural_change  preparation  readiness  warning_signs  howto  interpretation  core_businesses  obsolescence  taxonomy  change  pivots 
january 2009 by jerryking

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