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jerryking : asymmetrical   18

Globe editorial: China wants Canada to shut up. That’s exactly why we shouldn’t
December 2, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | EDITORIAL.

That’s why “guts” isn’t the answer. Canada needs to be smart, and exploit Beijing’s weaknesses.

The biggest one is the Chinese economy. Mr. Xi’s Orwellian surveillance state needs steady economic growth to keep Chinese citizens passive. Mr. Trump’s trade war has slowed China’s growth and made the Communist Party a bit more vulnerable than it would like.

You could see that in the threat made by China’s ambassador to Canada after the U.S. legislation standing up for Hong Kong was passed. “If anything happens like this, we will certainly have very bad damage in our bilateral relationship,” he said of a possible similar action by Ottawa.

The last thing China wants is a co-ordinated, global effort calling out its abuses. Which means there ought to be just such an effort. Instead of letting Beijing isolate it, Ottawa should explore strategic alliances that would prevent that from happening.

Which leads to China’s other weakness: Its actions in Hong Kong are a violation of the treaty it signed when it took over the territory from the British in 1997.

Beijing agreed to a “gradual and orderly” evolution to universal suffrage in Hong Kong. Instead, under Mr. Xi, it has moved in the opposite direction.

If democratic countries stood up as one and demanded that it live up to its commitments, it would be difficult for China to carry out retaliation.

Instead, too many countries like Canada are leaving it to brave Hong Kongers to battle alone for something the entire world has a stake in. We can do better.
alliances  asymmetrical  bullying  Canada  Canada-China_relations  China  China_rising  editorials  Hong_Kong  Huawei  hostages  Meng_Wanzhou  new_normal  reprisals  strategic_alliances  surveillance_state  weaknesses  Xi_Jinping 
11 weeks ago by jerryking
Naive entrepreneurs at risk of losing out to venture capitalists
Jan. 20, 2016 | The Financial Times News: p6. | Murad Ahmed

Tech start-up financing is often structured to protect venture capitalists, not founders, says Murad Ahmed

Nicolas Brusson and Philip...
entrepreneur  founders  vc  venture_capital  France  BlaBlaCar  trustworthiness  relationships  funding  asymmetrical  investors  naivete  connected_cars 
april 2017 by jerryking
‘Beneficial opportunities’ are all in China’s favour
25 February 2017 | FT | Sir Christopher Ruane

This is disingenuous. Africa provides dozens of examples of lopsided investment that bolsters China politically and provides little or negative local economic benefit, from its dangerous copper mines in Zambia to the decimation of Nigerian textile manufacturing by Chinese imports. A similar pattern emerges globally.
China’s outward investment has been politically charged, socially disruptive and environmentally damaging in many ways.
disingenuous  China  Africa  textiles  letters_to_the_editor  FT  exploitation  deindustrialization  asymmetrical  dangers  predatory_practices  Zambia  Nigeria  neocolonialism  imperialism  FDI  environment  lopsided 
march 2017 by jerryking
U.K. Can’t Bank on EU’s Rationality in Talks - WSJ
By STEPHEN FIDLER
July 1, 2016

In a rational world, the EU would indeed react to Brexit by seeking the closest economic relationship possible with the U.K., and this may be what happens. But there are other factors suggesting this outcome shouldn’t be taken for granted.

Here are four reasons why:

Anger: The U.K. can’t draw on a wellspring of sympathy from the EU 27, and some leaders are plain angry that in their view the British government has put the EU’s future at risk to resolve a domestic political problem. “Moods are ephemeral,” said Peter Ludlow, a Brussels-based historian and analyst, before the vote. “But it will affect both the tone and the content of the earliest exchanges between the two parties.”

Mercantilism: an outdated philosophy that equates national prosperity with exports, still hold broad sway with the public and with politicians throughout Europe and farther afield. EU governments, not least in Paris, are salivating at the prospect of benefiting from the U.K.’s exclusion from the single market in services.

Asymmetry: Yes, the U.K. is important to Germany, but the EU as a whole is more important to Britain than vice versa.

Strategy: Germany and other EU governments don't want to 'reward' the UK with a special deal that tempts other countries to follow it toward exit.
Brexit  United_Kingdom  Germany  rationalism  negotiations  strategy  EU  anger  asymmetrical 
july 2016 by jerryking
The Revolt of the Weak - NYTimes.com
SEPT. 1, 2014 | NYT | By DAVID BROOKS.

there are certain unconscious habits and norms of restraint that undergird civilization. These habits and norms are now being challenged by a coalition of the unsuccessful.

What we’re seeing around the world is a revolt of the weak. There are certain weak movements and nations, beset by internal contradictions, that can’t compete if they play by the normal rules of civilization. Therefore, they are conspiring to blow up the rule book.....People who conduct foreign policy live today under the shadow of the postwar era. People instinctively understand that just after World War II, Harry Truman, George Marshall, Dean Acheson and others did something remarkable. They stepped outside the immediate crush of events and constructed a context in which people would live for the next several decades.

Some of the problems they faced did not seem gigantic: how to prevent a Communist insurgency from taking over a semi-failed government in Greece. But they understood that by projecting American power into Greece, they would be establishing certain norms and creating a framework for civilization.
Vladimir_Putin  Henry_Kissinger  George_Marshall  Harry_Truman  David_Brooks  ISIS  rogue_actors  U.S.foreign_policy  post-WWII  Dean_Acheson  diplomacy  asymmetrical  APNSA 
september 2014 by jerryking
China's Space Ambitions - WSJ.com
Dec. 18, 2013

Space is ideal for asymmetric warfare, which is central to Beijing's military strategy. With a relatively modest investment, China has developed the capacity to destroy expensive satellites that the U.S. military needs for targeting and command and control. In 2007, China successfully tested an interceptor on one of its weather satellites. Three years later, it maneuvered one satellite close to another, and in July it launched three more maneuverable satellites that could be used to destroy enemy surveillance or communications.
asymmetrical  China  China_rising  space  space_exploration  space_travel  space_warfare 
december 2013 by jerryking
Barack Obama: Taking the Cyberattack Threat Seriously - WSJ.com
July 19, 2012 | WSJ| Barack Obama

In a future conflict, an adversary unable to match our military supremacy on the battlefield might seek to exploit our computer vulnerabilities here at home.
adversaries  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  Obama  simulations  vulnerabilities  asymmetrical  cyberattacks 
july 2012 by jerryking
On the Market
1 March 2012 | n + 1 | Alice Gregory.

I knew little about. In my interview, I told my future boss that I had never been able to imagine an idea that could be best expressed by painting it. “But,” I added, making exaggerated eye contact, “appreciating art doesn’t mean you can send effective emails. I can write. I can make your job easier for you.” This is the best thing to say in an interview if you are young and unqualified to do anything other than maintain a personal blog. I started three weeks later.....financial journalist Felix Salmon asserted in response that “the entire business of the art world is built on opacity and information asymmetry.” Salmon continued, “One of the weird things about conspicuous consumption in the art world is that for all that it’s conspicuous it isn’t public—outside the big public museums everybody tends to be very secretive indeed about what they own and what they don’t.”.....
art  auctions  Sotheby's  opacity  asymmetrical  conspicuous_consumption  information_asymmetry  provenance  financial_journalism  Felix_Salmon 
may 2012 by jerryking
Malcolm Gladwell says the Occupy movement needs to get more Machiavellian - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 02, 2011 | G&M | Ian Bailey.

"I am interested in, obviously, military power. I am interested in economic power. I am interested in any sort of situation. We're always in situations where power is an issue, where we're not equally matched with our competitors, compatriots, colleagues. Whenever there is a kind of disequilibrium, it's interesting. It's kind of puzzling and complex. That's what I am interested in exploring. Those moments of disequilibrium. "
Malcolm_Gladwell  asymmetrical  disequilibriums  economic_clout  protest_movements  political_power  Niccolò_Machiavelli  moments  Occupy_Wall_Street 
february 2012 by jerryking
Investment Strategies in Private Equity
Summer 2003| The Journal of Private Equity | Varun Sood
Adverse selection arises in a market
where buyers cannot accurately gauge the
quality of the product that they are buying. It
suggests that in such a case, the marketplace
most likely will contain generally poor-quality
products. This concept, also referred to as the
“hidden information” problem, is well known
in areas such as insurance and banking. In
simple terms, the theory is that there will
always be a seller for a poor-quality good,
because a seller of such items will always want
to sell. Therefore, by “self-selection,” poor quality
goods will be overrepresented in offers
made to buyers as well as in those accepted for
purchase.
private_equity  asymmetrical  moral_hazards  investing  strategies  overrepresentation  self-selection  adverse_selection  latent  hidden  Gresham's_law 
november 2011 by jerryking
To risk or not to risk? Where (and when) should be the question
Sep 3, 2007 |The Globe and Mail pg. B.6 | Daniel F. Muzyka, Glen Donaldson

First, risk can sometimes be asymmetric: bad news being more "bad" than good news is "good". For example, while a business project that goes particularly well might deliver slightly ahead of expectations, a bad project that goes off the rails may far exceed its time and budget...Second, risk is often interconnected: the knee-bone is connected to the shin-bone is connected to the foot-bone.
...Third, risks can be multiplicative, with a series of small risks combining to produce large outcomes....The good news is that advancements in risk management can help produce insight and can deal with some of the risks. One can consider four steps to managing risk: identification, measurement, mitigation, and monitoring.
ProQuest  Daniel_Muzyka  risk-management  insights  large_payoffs  measurements  compounded  interconnections  risk-mitigation  multiplicative  risks  network_risk  asymmetrical  cumulative  risk-assessment  bad_news 
october 2011 by jerryking
Technology Is Central To CIA's Strategic Plan - WSJ.com
APRIL 26, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By SIOBHAN GORMAN.
The CIA announced a five-year strategic plan that would invest heavily
in new technologies to combat non-traditional threats like cyber attacks
from overseas and gain better intelligence on rogue states like Iran.
... Mr. Panetta released his five-year plan in remarks to agency
employees. "We govern either by leadership or by crisis," he said.
"That's why we're taking a hard look at future challenges, and what we
want our agency to look like five years from now."
threats  adaptability  instability  unpredictability  rogue_actors  security_&_intelligence  CIA  strategic_planning  cyber_warfare  asymmetrical  Iran  Africa  Pakistan  innovation  Pentagon  forward_looking  leadership  strategic_thinking  decentralization  non-traditional  technology  Leon_Panetta 
may 2010 by jerryking
Level the Playing Field - Entrepreneur.com
June 2009 | Entrepreneur Magazine | By Romanus Wolter. Make
sure people in positions of power value your experience and judgment.
negotiations  asymmetrical  tips 
february 2010 by jerryking
Cyber Warriors
March 2010 | The Atlantic Online | James Fallows
Click here to find out more!

When will China emerge as a military threat to the U.S.? In most
respects the answer is: not anytime soon—China doesn’t even contemplate a
time it might challenge America directly. But one significant threat
already exists: cyberwar. Attacks—not just from China but from Russia
and elsewhere—on America’s electronic networks cost millions of dollars
and could in the extreme cause the collapse of financial life, the halt
of most manufacturing systems, and the evaporation of all the data and
knowledge stored on the Internet.

by James Fallows
China  cyber_warfare  security_&_intelligence  James_Fallows  infrastructure  sigint  vulnerabilities  asymmetrical 
february 2010 by jerryking
Principles matter - negotiation strategies for entrepreneurs
July 4, 2003 | First published in the Globe and Mail | By BRIAN
BABCOCK Responding to a bully tactic on pricing. Prepare your brief,
then review your brief, and prepare it again. Have I prepared, revised,
and prepared again? Do I know all I can know about my market and my
competitors? Do I have a plan for negotiations? Have I judiciously
communicated my interests to the other people at the table? Do I
understand their interests? Do I know what I'll do if negotiations
fail? What's my best alternative to agreement? How can I change the
paradigm? Is my interest to expand the possibility of mutual gains? Am I
positional bargaining or interest-based negotiating? Do I remain
principled in the face of brinksmanship? Have I separated my emotions
from the bargaining process? Can I identify when my energy is wasted on
emotional "nonsense" and blame? Will the agreement create lasting
relationships of respect and trust? If not, how do I create those
critical and strategic positions?
asymmetrical  bargaining  BATNA  blaming_fingerpointing  Brian_Babcock  brinksmanship  bullying  emotional_mastery  emotions  mentoring  negotiations  preparation  pricing  respect  trustworthiness 
march 2009 by jerryking

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