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jerryking : attitudes   19

A hacker mindset for success, the accelerated way - FT.com
September 10, 2014 | FT | By Emma Jacobs.

Cedarbrae: Book Nonfiction In Library 650.1 SNO

Shane Snow’s book Smartcuts....too many of us are mired in dated ways of doing things, argues Snow. Traditional thinking goes something like this: if we pay our dues and take our time, we might earn great success. What Snow suggests instead is that we learn from people such as Groupon's Mr Mason, who “buck the norm and do incredible things in implausibly short amounts of time”.

Snow, a tech journalist in New York and co-founder of Contently, which provides content for brands, believes we all need a hacker mindset to become successful. He is not advocating criminality or even the skills of a coder but suggests applying lateral thinking to careers and business problems. Rather than shortcuts, he advocates ethical “smartcuts”, hence the book’s title. Classic success advice, he writes, is “work 100 hours a week, believe you can do it, visualise, and push yourself harder than everyone else. Claw that nail out with your bare hands ‘til they bleed if necessary”. He dismisses this as “the hard way”.
He argues, for example, that mentors do not work because they are stiff and formulaic.
hackers  books  career_paths  disruption  attitudes  lateral_thinking  thinking  hacks  mindsets  shortcuts  speed 
september 2014 by jerryking
How Jurgen Klinsmann Plans to Make U.S. Soccer Better (and Less American) - NYTimes.com
By SAM BORDENJUNE 4, 2014

Most coaches would have understood the players’ sluggishness; most people would have excused it.

Klinsmann did not. He wants to win every practice. He wants to win every game. He wants accountability at every moment. He wants the sort of committed, hungry, unentitled attitude that is the very opposite of what so many American pro athletes regard as their birthright.

Klinsmann believes firmly in two things: first, that a national soccer team is always racing the clock. Casual fans may not realize it, but the men responsible for coaching players in the biggest soccer games of their lives every four years actually see their players about as often as they see their barbers. (In the 500 or so days from the beginning of last year until training camp began last month, Klinsmann got to work with his top players for two days before a game here, three days before a qualifier there, for a total of no more than 40 or 50 days — roughly the length of spring training in baseball, if spring training were played in different countries and stretched out over 16 months.)

The second thing Klinsmann believes is that if the United States is ever going to really succeed at a World Cup, a specific and significant change must occur within the team. That change does not necessarily have to do with how the Americans play; rather, it has to do with the American players being too American. Put simply, Klinsmann would like to see his players carry themselves like their European counterparts — the way he used to.
soccer  German  coaching  organizational_culture  team  hustle  attitudes  grit 
june 2014 by jerryking
The need for an analytical approach to life
November 3, 2013 | FT.com | By Rebecca Knight.

Risk analysis is not about predicting events; it’s about understanding the probability of possible scenarios, according to Elisabeth Paté-Cornell, professor at the Stanford School of Engineering.
In her latest research, she argues that expressions such as “black swan” and “perfect storm”, which have become journalistic shorthand when describing catastrophes, are just excuses for poor planning. Managers, should “think like engineers” and take a systematic approach to risk analysis. They should figure out how a system works and then identify the probable ways in which it could fail.
So does a black swan event exist?
The only one that I can think of is the Aids epidemic. In the case of a true black swan, you cannot anticipate it.
And what about ‘perfect storms’?
A combination of rare events is often referred to as a perfect storm. I think people underestimate the probability of them because they wrongly assume that the elements of a perfect storm are independent. If something happened in the past – even though it may not have happened at the same time as something else – it is likely to happen again in the future.
Why should managers take an engineering approach to analysing the probability of perfect storms?
Engineering risk analysts think in terms of systems – their functional components and their dependencies. If you’re in charge of risk management for your business, you need to see the interdependencies of any of the risks you’re managing: how the markets that you operate in are interrelated, for example.
You also need imagination. Several bad things can happen at once. Some of these are human errors and once you make a mistake, others are more likely to happen. This is because of the sequence of human error. When something bad happens or you make a mistake, you get distracted which means you’re more likely to make another mistake, which could lead to another bad event. When you make an error, stop and think. Anticipate and protect yourself.
How can you compute the likelihood of human error?
There are lots of ways to use systems analysis to calculate the probability of human error. Human errors are often rooted in the way an organisation is managed: either people are not skilled enough to do their jobs well; they do not have enough information; or they have the wrong incentives. If you’re paid for maximum production you’re going to take risks.
So in the case of a financial company I’d say monitor your traders, and maybe especially those that make a lot of money. There are a lot of ways you can make a lot of money: skill, luck, or through imprudent choices that sooner or later are going to catch up with you.
So you can do risk analysis even without reliable statistics?
We generally do a system-based risk analysis because we do not have reliable statistics. The goal is to look ahead and use the information we have to assess the chances that things might go wrong.
The upshot is that business schools ought to do a better job of teaching MBAs about probability.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
“Numbers make intangibles tangible,” said Jonah Lehrer, a journalist and
author of “How We Decide,” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009). “They
give the illusion of control. [Add "sense of control" to tags]
engineering  sense_of_control  black_swan  warning_signs  9/11  HIV  Aids  business_schools  MBAs  attitudes  interconnections  interdependence  mindsets  Stanford  imagination  systems_thinking  anticipating  probabilities  pretense_of_knowledge  risk-management  thinking_tragically  complexity  catastrophes  shorthand  incentives  quantified_self  multiple_stressors  compounded  human_errors  risks  risk-analysis  synchronicity  cumulative  self-protection  systematic_approaches 
november 2013 by jerryking
Jurgen Klinsmann Has U.S. Soccer Team Speaking German - WSJ.com
June 19, 2013 | WSJ | By MATTHEW FUTTERMAN.

When head coach Jurgen Klinsmann, the former German star, took over this band of oddly self-satisfied athletes two years ago, he promised to change the culture of U.S. soccer at the highest level. He aimed to build a side that played with both discipline and fury—one that could compete consistently with the best soccer nations. In other words, to turn them into... perhaps not Germany exactly, but something like it....Players talk constantly now about wearing out opponents rather than surviving them, of wanting to enforce their will on games and not simply being satisfied with that staple of American soccer from toddlerhood on—the trophy for participation. "Jurgen has instilled that mentality to fight for every ball, to play your role, to not take plays off," midfielder Graham Zusi said after Tuesday's win. "If we do that we can eventually grind a team down." In other words, what Germans do......"It is what is required to play well internationally. You got to play fast. You got to play at a high tempo, you got to play both ways, get behind the ball and be going forward. If you're going to be with the best in the world, this is what you got to do."

He has conveyed his message with the subtlety of a Wagnerian symphony. He belittled the accomplishments of his top players, booted team captain Carlos Bocanegra, even temporarily dropped Jozy Altidore, the team's top striker, all in an effort to teach these big fish in the smallish pond of U.S. soccer they need to burn to get better. His message, that international soccer is no joke, seems to be sinking in.
soccer  German  coaching  organizational_culture  team  hustle  operational_tempo  attitudes  grit  mindsets  fingerspitzengefühl  tempo  momentum 
june 2013 by jerryking
The Difference Between The Mindsets Of Founders And Professional Managers - Forbes
Eric Jackson, Contributor

I cover the business of technology
Follow (1,079)
Investing
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3/26/2013
entrepreneur  start_ups  attitudes  mindsets  founders 
march 2013 by jerryking
A Liberal Arts Foundation for Any Career - Room for Debate
March 24, 2013 | NYTimes.com | William Pannapacker

When it comes to choosing a major, you should engage with things that you care about, that interest you and that will produce your strongest efforts. Your major must not be the path of least resistance or an excuse for narrowness. Don’t be the English major who says, “I’m scared of math and computers.” Don’t be a chemistry major who says, “I never read books.”

Become the kind of person who is interested in everything and can do anything.

I keep hearing the same thing from potential employers: “We love students with liberal-arts degrees. They are curious; they know how to ask good questions. They know how to conduct research. They are effective writers and speakers. And they learn quickly.“...Liberal-arts colleges are now engaging with the “digital humanities.” Simply put, that means we are producing history and music majors who are as good at working with technology as they are at developing research projects and performing on stage....In a period of rapid, unpredictable change, a combination of traditional liberal-arts education, collaborative research, workplace experiences, and a “can-do” attitude is the safest bet for future employment, as well as the foundation for good citizenship and a life that’s engaged with culture and thought.

Updated March 24, 2013,
liberal_arts  humanities  Colleges_&_Universities  education  questions  attitudes  curiosity 
march 2013 by jerryking
Everything I know I learned at Western, plus a little extra
From a chemistry prof whom I will not embarrass by naming him — my career as a chemist was short, lasting about halfway into
second year, and its trajectory was none of his fault — I learned a set of procedures for solving complex problems. Write down what you know. Write down what you’re trying to figure out. Write down the tools you’ve mastered that might get you from here to there. It’s not a technique, really, just an attitude toward the known and unknown, which is why it’s all I’ve retained from my failed years as a science student.
I’ve learned that politicians who approach problems with the same attitude — What do you have? What do you need? How can you
get from here to there? — are likelier to succeed than the ones
who hope to coast on “charisma” or “electability” or, Lord save us,“vision.” At school, the kids who sat at the front of the lecture hall and closed the library every night actually did better. The same is true in life.
Paul_Wells  UWO  problem_solving  unknowns  information_gaps  charisma  attitudes  politicians  visionaries  electability  5_W’s  complex_problems 
january 2013 by jerryking
Viola Davis on a Mind-Set That She Says Harms Black Actors - NYTimes.com
February 14, 2012, 8:30 am
Viola Davis on a Mind-Set That She Says Harms Black Actors
By MELENA RYZIK

“I want you to win,” Mr. Smiley said, “but I’m ambivalent about what you’re winning for.”

Ms. Davis was direct. “That very mind-set that you have and that a lot of African-Americans have is absolutely destroying the black artist,” she said.

“The black artist cannot live in a revisionist place,” she added. “The black artist can only tell the truth about humanity, and humanity is messy. People are messy. Caucasian actors know that.”
African-Americans  actors  films  movies  Tavis_Smiley  attitudes  mindsets 
february 2012 by jerryking
Tough-mindedness - Gabor's Positive Thoughts
William James, a great teacher of psychology & philosophy
at Harvard during the early yrs. of the 20th century, made the useful
distinction between being tough-minded vs. tender-minded. The terms have
nothing to do with levels of ethical conduct; the toughness referred to
is toughness of the intellectual apparatus, toughness of the spirit,
not toughness of the heart. It is the attitude & the qualities &
the training that enable one to seize on facts & make these facts a
basis for intelligent, courageous action. The tough-minded have a zest
for tackling hard problems. They dare to grapple with the unfamiliar
& wrest useful truth from stubborn new facts. They are not dismayed
by change. Above all, the tough-minded do not wall themselves in
comfortable illusions. They do not rely on the easy precepts of
tradition or on mere conformity to regulations. They know that the
answers are not in the book.
tough_love  tough-mindedness  attitudes  conformity  mindsets  decision_making  ambiguities  change  illusions  arduous 
april 2011 by jerryking
black like them
April 29, 1996 | gladwell dot com | Malcolm Gladwell
Malcolm_Gladwell  African-Americans  Caribbean  migrants  culture  attitudes  immigrants 
march 2011 by jerryking
Want to Be More Successful? Change Your Mindset
January 24, 2011 | BNET | By Jeffrey Pfeffer. for most
people, networking, building social relationships with strangers at, for
instance, events and functions, was seen as a task. That mindset held
true for many of the other actions required to build power–they were
tasks. Tasks, he said, are things like taking out the garbage. You don’t
try to develop your “skill” at taking out the garbage, you don’t think
much about it, you just do it and get it over with.

However, if you think of networking as a skill, then that mindset
changes everything. Skills are things that can, and maybe even should,
be developed. You think about how well you are performing skills, you
work on getting better, you get feedback, you apply thought, you learn.
attitudes  lifehacks  skills  networking  mindsets 
march 2011 by jerryking
Race, Sex and the Trials of a Young Explorer - NYTimes.com
February 13, 2011, 5:00 pm
Race, Sex and the Trials of a Young Explorer
By RICHARD CONNIFF
race  racism  Africa  attitudes 
february 2011 by jerryking
Why a Product’s Job Matters
April 18, 2007 | - The Informed Reader - WSJ | by Robin
Moroney. A basic principle of business–knowing what consumers want from
a particular product–is often ignored by corporations. Many businesses
focus on qualities that are largely irrelevant to the consumers’ buying
decisions, such as product prices, or data on customer age, gender and
marital status. Some business-to-business companies slice their markets
by industry; others by size of business. The problem with such
segmentation schemes is that they are static. Customers’ buying
behaviors change far more often than their demographics, psychographics
or attitudes. This leads to situations in which, in the words of the
late business guru Peter Drucker, “the customer rarely buys what the
business thinks it sells him.”
Peter_Drucker  Clayton_Christensen  Scott_Anthony  segmentation  marketing  market_segmentation  static  dynamic  purchase_decisions  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  B2B  demographics  psychographics  attitudes  demographic_information  relevance  consumer_behavior  behavioral_change  irrelevance 
january 2010 by jerryking
Pitching With Purpose
Published: April 1, 2008 |New York Times | By DAVID BROOKS

“Self-discipline is a form of freedom. Freedom from laziness and
lethargy, freedom from expectations and demands of others, freedom from
weakness and fear — and doubt.” You can’t simply urge someone to be
disciplined; you have to build a structure of behavior and attitude.
Behavior shapes thought. If a player disciplines his behavior, then he
will also discipline his mind. A pitcher’s mind is better balanced when
it is unceasingly aggressive.
habits  David_Brooks  book_reviews  baseball  self-discipline  mindsets  attitudes  life_skills  work_habits  routines 
april 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: My friend is newly jobless - and clueless
February 19, 2009 at 7:21 PM EST G& M column by DAVID EDDIE
offering advice to the newly jobless and clueless. Start looking for
work right away and not wait (I'd told him I would start looking as soon
as my current job was over): "Because people can tell when you're in
your bathrobe, both literally and metaphorically."
job_search  layoffs  attitudes  metaphors 
february 2009 by jerryking
Pew Global Attitudes Project: Introduction and Summary: The Great Divide: How Westerners and Muslims View Each Other ...
June 22, 2006 release of results of large scale attitudinal survey undertaken by the Pew Research Center in the Spring of 2006.
attitudes  Islamic  Western_values  surveys 
january 2009 by jerryking

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