recentpopularlog in

jerryking : audits   5

Successful people act quickly when things go wrong - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Aug. 02, 2015

Productivity

Pivot quickly to maximize success
Airplanes are off course 90 per cent of the time but incessantly correct their direction, . Similarly, successful people correct their course quickly when off-kilter. They also set short timelines, have small daily to-do lists and drop stuff that isn’t working. Lifehack.org

Branding

Learn from but don’t live in the past
It’s great to know your company history but senseless to live in the past,Your company’s history is valuable only if customers and prospective clients believe it defines your brand and success, and differentiates you from competitors. If it doesn’t, build a new history.

Leadership

Pre-empt attacks with regular audits
To pre-empt an activist investor’s attack, eliminate financial and operational underperformance. Conduct regular vulnerability audits, looking at factors such as how earnings per share, profit and price-to-earnings ratios in the past 18 months compare with peers. If necessary, create an aggressive turnaround plan. ChiefExecutive.net

Human resources

Ask potential hires where they’ll go next
It sounds weird, but LinkedIn asks potential employees what job they want to have next after they leave the company. Founder Reid Hoffman says it signals the intent to have a huge impact on the individual’s career, helping to develop them for whatever they choose, and invites honesty. Vox.com

Tech tip

Use phone’s camera as portable copier
Productivity blogger Mark Shead recommends using your phone’s camera as a portable copy machine/scanner when on the road, photographing paperwork, train schedules or other information. Many new camera phones have the resolution to provide readable copies. Productivity 501.com
branding  productivity  human_resources  leadership  Harvey_Schachter  character_traits  habits  pre-emption  course_correction  Reid_Hoffman  career_paths  beforemath  overachievers  affirmations  pivots  audits  signals  vulnerabilities  hiring  interviews  high-achieving 
august 2015 by jerryking
Due Diligence Gets Tougher: A loose term now means a whole lot more work
Aug 5. 2002 | The Investment Dealers’ Digest | by Barbara Etzel.

What constitutes enough due diligence anyway? It may be vague enough for attorneys to argue about, but there is no doubt that the bar has just been raised due to the steady diet of scandals and investors' mistrust of Wall Street. Attorneys say that the level of due diligence will continue to increase. That is because it will be up to advisers on all types of deals, stock and bond offerings as well as mergers and acquisitions, to make certain the company is complying with all the new laws that are being instituted. Corporations will need a policy for setting up internal controls and to have an independent audit committee. Their top officers will be required to certify the accuracy of their financial results, and those who falsely do so will face jail time and million-dollar fines. Companies will also be taking a closer look at their internal disclosure policies. That means that underwriters and their attorneys must understand what the company's policies are and make certain they are following them.
due_diligence  scandals  Wall_Street  investors  mistrust  financial_advisors  internal_controls  audits  disclosure 
september 2012 by jerryking
Climate Feedback: A new adaptation tool: climate insurance : Climate Feedback
22 Jul 2009 | 15:54 BST | Posted by Jeff Tollefson.

climate insurance is by no means a magic bullet. But clearly the tools of modern finance could certainly help make poor nations prepare for and respond to all manner of natural disasters big and small.

We explore some of these ideas in this week’s issue of Nature, taking a quick look at how the insurance debate is playing out in the ongoing United Nations climate talks. The upshot is that some kind of insurance mechanism is likely to make it into whatever climate deal is struck in Copenhagen and beyond.

One commonly cited option is index insurance, which is tied to things like rainfall that can be measured objectively. This cuts down on costs by eliminating the need for audits and investigations. In the case of something like crop insurance, moreover, it could put money in the hands of farmers immediately after the rains fail – and before the hunger sets in....Today these programs are being paid for largely by the farmers and nations buying the insurance, but industrialized nations would likely subsidize any insurance program deployed as part of an international climate agreement. The logic is that extreme weather variations – including droughts and heavy storms – are likely to increase in a warmer world, which means that both costs and premiums will rise as well.

A key challenge moving forward is how to scale up programs that benefit the world’s poorest farmers and communities. Dan Osgood, a researcher at Columbia University’s International Research Institute for Climate and Society, points out the pilot programs that are under way today have generally been deployed in areas where information – regarding weather, crops and the like – is available. This means it will only get more difficult moving forward....Osgood says the insurance question could also increase pressure on scientists and insurance companies to tease out the long-term impacts of global warming at very local scales.
insurance  crop_insurance  climate_change  natural_calamities  data  farming  poverty  hyperlocal  indices  microtargeting  audits  pilot_programs 
april 2012 by jerryking
Big debate about food safety | Canadian Grocer
Chris Powell, photo by Canadian Press.  |  September 21, 2011

Frank Schreurs, president and chief technical officer for the Guelph Food Technology Centre–which audits more than 1,500 food businesses, agrees. The CMAJ editorial has “taken some information and they’re couching it to make it sound like, ‘Oh we’re in a lot of trouble.’ We’re not,” says Schreurs. “We’ve got one of the soundest food safety systems in the world.”

Charlebois, now associate dean at the University of Guelph’s College of Management and Economics, thinks consumers must also share some of the blame for food safety. He estimates that close to 85% of
the reported 11 million annual cases of food-borne illness are the result of improper
handling at home.
product_recalls  tracking  traceability  audits  Sylvain_Charlebois  food_safety 
december 2011 by jerryking
Clinical depression | NOW Magazine
October 23-30, 2003 | NOW | By Ali Sharrif.

African Canadian Legal Clinic in turmoil over shocking audit.

the leak of a thick audit conducted by the clinic’s funder, Legal Aid Ontario, over the last week, all hell has broken loose. The document was sent to media, including to this reporter, by a clinic employee upset by the audit’s contents.

The audit, released in April, raised questions about the possible misuse of funds and inflation of client numbers, and pointed to the existence of "weak internal controls with respect to the payment of expenditures.’ Documents suggest that some $418,000 was received from various funders but not reported to Legal Aid Ontario, which backs the group to the tune of approximately $628,000 yearly.
African_Canadians  lawyers  law  irregularities  mismanagement  audits  internal_controls 
november 2011 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read