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George Trower-Subira, author, lecturer
December 16, 2010 | The Inquirer | by JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com

FOR A MAN who spent his life in the often frustrating struggle to win justice for African-Americans, George Russell Trower-Subira embodied the meaning of the Swahili word that he added to his given name.

"Subira" means "patience" in Swahili. And that was one of the main characteristics of George's character.

"He had incredible patience with people," said his brother, Len Trower. "Even people who did unjust things to him, he would forgive them. He would try to rationalize why they did it. Me? I'd be throwing things against the wall."

George Russell Trower-Subira, who grew up in Philadelphia as George Trower and wrote numerous books of self-help advice for African-Americans as George Subira, collapsed and died of a heart attack Sunday while jogging on the track at Penn Wood High School, in East Lansdowne. He was 66 and lived in East Lansdowne.

He was a major influence on the subject of black entrepreneurship through his writings and speeches. His book, "Black Folks Guide to Making Big Money in America," published in 1980, was the first to tell blacks that what was missing from their drive for equality was success in the economic arena.....George traveled the country expounding these views, and was in demand at schools and conferences as a speaker and teacher of economic values and business development for blacks.

He gained wide recognition for his ideas and was interviewed on the Phil Donahue show, the "Today" show, "Tony Brown's Journal" and the "700 Club," and was written up in Essence, Ebony, Jet and Black Enterprise, among others.
African-Americans  authors  economic_clout  entrepreneurship  entrepreneur  obituaries  black_power  conspicuous_consumption  distractions  entertainment  immaturity  pay_attention  self-discipline 
12 weeks ago by jerryking
What tech hasn’t learnt from science fiction
APRIL 3, 2019 | Financial Times | Elaine Moore.

Never mind the future: where are the books tackling Silicon Valley’s current challenges?

There is a myth that Silicon Valley is stuffed full of nerds who have never picked up a book in their lives. Like a lot of tales about the Valley, it is not true. The tech industry is acutely aware of the value of storytelling.......Whenever a tech founder is asked about their favourite novel it is usually worth paying attention. Uber founder Travis Kalanick’s admires Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead.....Jeff Bezos’s is taken by the quiet despair of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Remains of the Day......and Theranos' Elizabeth Holme is attached to Moby-Dick.

It’s true that reading lists on the West Coast tend to skew towards science fiction.......For Silicon Valley, the genre seems to offer both inspiration and validation. .......But the connection between tech companies and sci-fi novels runs deeper. To make their futuristic projects reality, some seek the help of the authors themselves......Less is made of its focus on the downside of humanity interacting with a virtual world (jk: sci fi doesn't pay enough attention to the the downside of humanity interacting with a virtual world). .....The affection tech founders feel for sci-fi often seems to lack this dimension.....If founders are not paying too much attention to cautionary sci-fi themes, at least some people are. Amazon Go shops can feel like a vision of the future as you pick up milk and walk away, without scanning anything. But cities such as San Francisco have begun to wonder whether cashless shops will end up marginalising the country’s poorest citizens, who do not have access to online bank accounts......does any sci-fi novel offers a way to think about Silicon Valley’s present, as well as its future? The singularity and inter-planetary travel are well covered in literature..... are there book out there that address privacy scandals, electric scooters and $100bn IPOs?
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
* Counting Heads' (2005) by David Marusek is a novel set in 2134.
* Mars trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson.
* Idoru" by William Gibson.
* Count Zero" by William Gibson.
* "Black Mirror" TV series Charlie Brooker.
* The Circle by Dave Eggers.
* ‘Minority Report’ Phil K Dick.
* Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson
* Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson.

People who don't read science fiction (SF) are handicapped in today's world really, because usually they form part of the 99% of humans who are unable to look ahead more than a few months or so and see where society is going. ......Or the people that think Elon Musk is a visionary. He is not a visionary! He is just a smart person, which necessarily includes reading SF, and taking things from there. People who do not read SF think that Musk is the only person on the planet thinking about and developing our future society on Mars...  But there are millions - it's just that he is one of a few billionaires working concretely on it. For example, if you read the Mars trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson, you'd realise that one of the reasons that Elon Musk now has a tunnel boring company is that we will NEED tunnels on Mars... You'd also realise that the TV rights of the trip to Mars will pay for (most of) the cost of the trip... etc. etc. etc.
Amazon_Go  augmented_reality  Ayn_Rand  authors  books  cautionary_tales  Elon_Musk  entrepreneur  fiction  founders  future  futurists  novels  pay_attention  reading_lists  San_Francisco  science_fiction  Silicon_Valley  start_ups  storytelling  virtual_reality  William_Gibson 
april 2019 by jerryking
Philip Roth: a titan of American letters
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Philip_Roth  obituaries  writers  authors  best_of 
may 2018 by jerryking
Sir Wilson Harris obituary | Books
Fri 9 Mar 2018 | The Guardian | Michael Mitchell

16.13 GMT Last modified on Sun 11 Mar 2018 11.28 GMT
obituaries  Guyanese  Guyana  Afro-Guyanese  writers  authors  Wilson_Harris 
march 2018 by jerryking
David Ignatius — Charlie Rose
11/07/2017 | Charlie Rose Show|

David Ignatius, columnist for The Washington Post, talks about Saudi Arabia, President Trump's China visit, and his new spy novel, Quantum Spy.
G-2  China  Saudi_Arabia  David_Ignatius  U.S.-China_relations  U.S.foreign_policy  Charlie_Rose  interviews  security_&_intelligence  authors  books  quantum_computing  novels  fiction  CIA 
november 2017 by jerryking
When Jack Daniel’s Failed to Honor a Slave, an Author Rewrote History - The New York Times
By CLAY RISEN AUG. 15, 2017

“It’s absolutely critical that the story of Nearest gets added to the Jack Daniel story,” Mark I. McCallum, the president of Jack Daniel’s Brands at Brown-Forman, said in an interview.

The company’s decision to recognize its debt to a slave, first reported last year by The New York Times, is a momentous turn in the history of Southern foodways. Even as black innovators in Southern cooking and agriculture are beginning to get their due, the tale of American whiskey is still told as a whites-only affair, about Scots-Irish settlers who brought Old World distilling knowledge to the frontier states of Tennessee and Kentucky.

Green’s story changes all that by showing how enslaved people likely provided the brains as well as the brawn in what was an arduous, dangerous and highly technical operation......Mr. May said that so far, visitor response to the new tours spotlighting Green’s contribution has been positive. It’s not hard to see why: At a rough time for race relations in America, the relationship between Daniel and Green allows Brown-Forman to tell a positive story, while also pioneering an overdue conversation about the unacknowledged role that black people, as slaves and later as free men, played in the evolution of American whiskey.
African-Americans  authors  distilleries  history  liquor  origin_story  slavery  storytelling  whiskey  writers 
august 2017 by jerryking
Spencer Johnson, ‘Who Moved My Cheese?’ Author, Dies at 78 - The New York Times
“Who Moved My Cheese?,” which was published in 1998, was the story — in 94 pages of large type — of two mice, Sniff and Scurry, and two tiny people, Hem and Haw, looking for cheese in a maze. When the cheese supply runs out at Cheese Station C, the mice leave without angst to find more.

But Hem and Haw resist, refusing to accept change. Haw overcomes his anxiety and ventures out of his comfort zone — at first timidly, but then, gradually, with more confidence — in search of a new supply of cheese.

“Before long, he knew why he felt good,” Mr. Johnson wrote about Haw. “He stopped to write again on the wall: ‘When you stop being afraid, you feel good!’”
obituaries  '90s  metaphors  writers  authors  management_consulting 
july 2017 by jerryking
Acclaimed Canadian historian, author Michael Bliss dies at 76 - The Globe and Mail
TORONTO — The Canadian Press
Published Thursday, May 18, 2017

Bliss authored 14 books on business, politics, and medicine, was an Officer of the Order of Canada, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and a member of the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

When Bliss was inducted into the Medical Hall of Fame in 2016, Canadian Museum of History president Mark O’Neill called him “one of Canada’s leading intellectuals and historians.”

“Michael Bliss brings a wealth of knowledge to Canada and the world,” O’Neill said.
Canadian  historians  authors  writers  obituaries  uToronto  Michael_Bliss 
may 2017 by jerryking
David McCullough’s History Lessons
April 14, 2017 | WSJ | By Alexandra Wolfe.

David McCullough thinks that the country isn’t in such bad shape. It’s all relative, says the 83-year-old historian and author of such books as the Pulitzer Prize-winning biographies “Truman” (1992) and “John Adams” (2001). He points to the Civil War, for instance, when the country lost 2% of its population—that would be more than six million people today—or the flu pandemic of 1918, when more than 500,000 Americans died. “Imagine that on the nightly news,” he says.

History gives us a sense of proportion, he says: “It’s an antidote to a lot of unfortunately human trends like self-importance and self-pity.”.....see history “as an aid to navigation in such troubled, uncertain times,”.....[McCullough] thought back to something that the playwright and novelist Thornton Wilder had said while a fellow at Yale during Mr. McCullough’s undergraduate days. When Wilder heard a good story and wished to see it on the stage, he wrote the play himself. When he wanted to read a book about an interesting event, he wrote it himself.....Even today, Mr. McCullough doesn’t use a computer for research or writing. He still goes to libraries and archives to find primary sources and writes on a typewriter. ...History, he adds, is “often boiled down to statistics and dates and quotations that make it extremely boring.” The key to generating interest, he says, is for professors and teachers to frame history as stories about people.
archives  authors  biographies  Civil_War  contextual  David_McCullough  DIY  flu_outbreaks  Harry_Truman  historians  history  John_Adams  libraries  self-importance  self-pity  sense_of_proportion  storytelling 
april 2017 by jerryking
Review: ‘Winter is Coming’, by Garry Kasparov
NOVEMBER 8, 2015 | FT | Review by John Thornhill

‘Winter is Coming: Why Vladimir Putin and the Enemies of the Free World Must be Stopped’, by Garry Kasparov, Atlantic Books, £16.99; Public Affairs, $26.99

"The price of deterrence always goes up"

the real power of Kasparov’s book lies in his argument that the west must pursue a more assertive and moral foreign policy, something that has faded out of fashion. In his view, the most moral foreign policy is also the most effective. It enhances international security by insisting on observance of law....one of the most important aspects of any moral foreign policy is its consistency. Western leaders should keep talking about human rights issues in good times as well as bad. Otherwise, these issues become just another chip on the “geopolitical gaming table”. Those leaders should also insist on raising these subjects with strong autocracies, such as China, as well as the weak.

in Kasparov’s view, US President Bill Clinton squandered the chance to advance the international human rights agenda in the 1990s, as the west took a holiday from history. And today the west is too “uninformed, callous, or apathetic” to assert its influence and values.

He, rightly, argues that one of the most important aspects of any moral foreign policy is its consistency. Western leaders should keep talking about human rights issues in good times as well as bad. Otherwise, these issues become just another chip on the “geopolitical gaming table”. Those leaders should also insist on raising these subjects with strong autocracies, such as China, as well as the weak.
books  Russia  Vladimir_Putin  book_reviews  authors  writers  dictators  dictatorships  deterrence  dissension  Ukraine  human_rights  strategic_thinking  autocracies  chess  authoritarianism  foreign_policy  geopolitics  liberal_pluralism  rogue_actors  Garry_Kasparov  consistency  exile 
january 2017 by jerryking
Why Self-Help Guru James Altucher Only Owns 15 Things
AUG. 6, 2016 | The New York Times | By ALEX WILLIAMS.

there has never been a better time to choose yourself, he said.

You do not have to be Mark Zuckerberg, he said, to be an entrepreneur. “You can learn basic web development,” he said. “You can go to Codeacademy.com, learn the basic skills in three months, then sell them on Freelancer.com, where there are millions of jobs. I know 15-year-olds who are making a few thousand dollars a month.”
self-help  James_Altucher  authors  freelancing  software_development 
august 2016 by jerryking
Violently Wrought, Kaitlyn Greenidge interviews Marlon James - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics
Kaitlyn Greenidge interviews Marlon James
November 3, 2014

Guernica: When you are inside the big book, how do you map out structure?

Marlon James: I have note sheets. I use Moleskine notebooks. I’m analog like that. I have a plot chart. I have different columns for the character, rows with different times of day, because even though it’s a big book, each chapter takes place basically in a day. So I need to know where Nina Burgess is at nine o’clock, and where she’ll be at ten. It allows me to be spontaneous. It’s sort of like how knowing prosody really liberates a poet.

If you know you have a backbone, you can bend and contort. That’s what allowed a lot of the freedom in the book. Because half of that stuff in that chart I didn’t follow. Because characters become real and they don’t take crap from you. But also because I always knew where the return line was. You can always go so far out on a limb and know you have to come back to this point. Plot charts and diagramming also stopped me from playing favorites. Because everybody had to get equal time.
Marlon_James  writers  Caribbean  culture  violence  fiction  books  Jamaica  '70s  profile  authors  teachers  Bob_Marley  writing  analog  spontaneity  Moleskine  plot_charts  diagramming  Man_Booker  prizes 
january 2016 by jerryking
Isabel Wilkerson Reflects on the Black Lives Matter Movement
January 05, 2015 | Essence.com | Essay by Isabel Wilkerson.
Where Do We Go From Here?:

The outcomes in Staten Island and Ferguson and elsewhere signal, as in the time of Jim Crow, that the loss of Black life at the hands of authorities does not so much as merit further inquiry and that the caste system has only mutated with the times.From this, we have learned that the journey is far from over and that we must know our history to gain strength for the days ahead. We must love ourselves even if—and perhaps especially if—others do not. We must keep our faith even as we work to make our country live up to its creed. And we must know deep in our bones and in our hearts that if the ancestors could survive the Middle Passage, we can survive anything.
African-Americans  authors  journalists  women  feedback_loops  digital_advocacy  Reconstruction  Jim_Crow  the_South  internal_migration  Black_Lives_Matter  Isabel_Wilkerson  Great_Migration 
may 2015 by jerryking
David Chilton’s rise from The Wealthy Barber to The Wealthy Dragon - The Globe and Mail
IAN MCGUGAN
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 23 2015,

Clips from the Wealthy Barber

On luck: “I’ve been incredibly lucky in life, and my health is my greatest gift. I don’t work out much, I love Nibs and Diet Pepsi, but I’m never sick a day, I never get a cold, I hardly ever sleep, and it’s all from my mom and dad. They’re in their early 80s and still have crazy energy.”

On the economy: “I try to be optimistic but you have to be concerned about debt levels just about anywhere in the developed world. I think governments are making promises they may not be able to keep. It would not shock me to see another financial crisis at some point over the next three to five years.”

On investing: “It’s shocking how badly many people manage their own investments. Mutual fund fees and expenses are part of that, but we also appear to have mastered the art of buying mutual funds that are just about to underperform.”

On mutual funds: “Paying 2 per cent [in mutual fund fees] doesn’t sound like much, because we still relate things to our high school marks. Losing 2 per cent off a mark of, say, 70 per cent is no big deal. But with mutual funds, you’re talking about losing two percentage points of an estimated 8 per cent or so return. That’s a quarter of your expected gain.”

On alternative investing: “If you’re going to get involved with hedge funds, don’t invest in them, run them.”

On entrepreneurship: “A lot of the people we see on Dragons’ Den have the naive idea that the biggest challenge in business is getting their product on the shelves. It’s not – it’s getting it off the shelves. Once it’s in the store, how do you create demand, how do you make it stand out among the competition?”

On perseverance: “No author in history did more interviews about a single book than I did about The Wealthy Barber. I did hundreds of interviews a year. For years and years and years.”
creating_demand  personal_finance  personal_branding  angels  entrepreneurship  luck  fees_&_commissions  perseverance  debt  investing  writers  authors  developed_countries  developing_countries 
january 2015 by jerryking
Wattpad's strategy is not exactly an open book - The Globe and Mail
ALEC SCOTT
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Sep. 25 2014
Wattpad  OMERS  authors  mobile  reading  writing 
september 2014 by jerryking
Tom Clancy knew that it was all about the story
Oct. 04 2013 | The Globe and Mail | ROBERT WIERSEMA

Late one afternoon, two men came into the store, clearly American in that slightly louder-talking, slightly bigger-than-life way that stands out in unassuming Victoria. They wandered the store for a bit before stopping at the display of Tom Clancy’s then-newest paperback, The Sum of All Fears.

One of the men brought a copy to the cash desk. Rather than pulling out his wallet, though, he asked to borrow a pen. Flipping the book open, he signed the title page, along with a note, something along the lines of: “Thank you for your support.”

He slid the book back across the desk to me with a small smile. And then, without another word, Tom Clancy left the store.

That casually bad-ass blend of hubris and humility was my one personal encounter with Clancy.....Clancy was one of a group of authors that included the recently departed and much-missed Elmore Leonard and Ray Bradbury, among others, who reminded me of the values of storytelling, the virtues of characterization, plot and wonder – elements that were either overlooked or looked down upon in the English department.
Tom_Clancy  covert_operations  espionage  authors  tributes  obituaries  writers  storytelling  virtues  characterization  plot  wonder 
october 2013 by jerryking
Why feminists have better sex - The Globe and Mail
zosia bielski
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Sep. 29, 2011 5:43PM EDT
Last updated Friday, Sep. 30, 2011
relationships  dating  feminism  sexual_relations  authors 
september 2011 by jerryking
Brad Thor
Series
Scot Harvath
1. The Lions Of Lucerne (2001)
2. Path of the Assassin (2003)
3. State of the Union (2004)
4. Blowback (2005)
5. Takedown (2006)
6. The First Commandment (2007)
7. The Last Patriot (2008)
8. The Apostle (2009)
9. Foreign Influence (2010)
10. Full Black (2011)
espionage  security_&_intelligence  books  authors  writers  novels  Brad_Thor 
august 2011 by jerryking
Harry Potter and the amazing exploding book industry — Tech News and Analysis
Jun. 23, 2011 | Gigaom | By Mathew Ingram. Despite the
obvious demand, Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling has adamantly refused
to offer electronic versions of her phenomenally popular series for
young adults — until now. As part of Thursday’s launch of an interactive
website called Pottermore, the billionaire writer also announced that
e-book versions of the novels will be available directly through the
site for all major platforms. In one fell swoop, Rowling has cut both
her publishers and booksellers such as Amazon out of the picture. Not
everyone has that kind of power, of course, but Rowling’s move shows how
the playing field in publishing continues to be disrupted.
books  publishing  Harry_Potter  authors  DIY  disruption  Mathew_Ingram  Amazon  e-books  hits 
june 2011 by jerryking
Remembering Edgar Mittelholzer: Part 1
November 15, 2010 | Stabroek News | By Colin Rickards.
The republication of four of the early novels of the late Guyanese
author Edgar Mittelholzer (1909-1965), and the intended republication of
six more, along with his autobiography, and a detailed evaluation of
his work, as well as a full scale biography, is giving a fresh lease of
life, and a whole new readership, to a near-forgotten author who died
more than half a century ago. Jeremy Poynting, who heads up the Peepal
Tree Press, based in Leeds, England, has been the catalyst for this
renewal of interest in Mittelholzer, a pioneering Caribbean writer.
Guyanese  Caribbean  authors  writers 
november 2010 by jerryking
Rafi Mohammed: Getting Pricing Right -
May 27, 2010 | BusinessWeek | By Nick Leiber. Small
businesses should feel confident about charging more, says the author of
The 1% Windfall.
pricing  small_business  authors 
august 2010 by jerryking
From Gutenberg to Zoobert - WSJ.com
AUG. 8, 2010 | WSJ | By L. GORDON CROVITZ . "Barnes &
Noble, whose more than 700 stores make it the largest bricks-and-mortar
book chain, put itself up for sale. Its market capitalization is less
than $1 B vs. Amazon's $55 B. This reflects both the better economics of
Web sales of print books and the increasingly uncertain future of print
books in an e-book world...Technology has made the physical scale of
B&N a liability...the iPad, with color and Web access, is pointing
the way to a new genre of e-books--called enhanced, multimedia or
"transmedia" versions of books, with video, audio and
interactivity...Textbook publishers offer e-books with video,
interactive testing and built-in research links...it's important to note
the costs...Lower sales of print books pressure publishers, which
usually get lower profits on e-books --> fewer opportunities for
aspiring authors until new business models emerge...it will take time
for book publishers and authors to find new revenues.
Barnes_&_Noble  creative_destruction  Johan_Gutenberg  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  e-books  publishing  textbooks  business_models  authors  bricks-and-mortar 
august 2010 by jerryking
Bits of Destruction Hit the Book Publishing Business: Part 4
August 17, 2009 | Read Write Web | Written by Bernard Lunn. In
Part 4 here, we focus on authors, without whom we would have nothing to
read.
publishing  creative_destruction  authors  creative_types  writers 
november 2009 by jerryking
Have you done your 10,000 hours? - The Globe and Mail
Margaret Wente

Published on Friday, Nov. 20, 2009 7:21PM EST Last updated on Monday, Nov. 23, 2009

"Outliers", if you have not. It's all about 10,00 hours of preparation and timing. Luck is the intersection of preparation and opportunity.
books  Margaret_Wente  Malcolm_Gladwell  Success  authors  genius  talent  psychology  Outliers 
november 2009 by jerryking

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