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Ikea dismantles tradition to seek inspiration from car industry
October 2, 2019 | Financial Times Richard Milne in Oslo.

Sometimes the complexity of their own companies can surprise top managers. Torbjorn Loof, chief executive of the owner of the Ikea brand, looks wide-eyed as he describes how the furniture retailer has nearly 100 different cabinets, sometimes with only 4-5 millimetres difference between models.

In storage solutions it has Pax wardrobes, Godmorgon bathroom cabinets, Metod in the kitchen and Besta in the living room — similar products but with subtly different heights or widths, making things difficult not just for the customer but also for Ikea itself.

So the world’s largest furniture retailer has looked to the car industry for inspiration. Platforms have dramatically changed the process of making cars — different models with vastly different pricing can be built on the same basic chassis. Changes are made between models on the things customers see — like the dashboard and entertainment systems — but much of the back-end that is invisible to drivers can be common.

Now Ikea is looking to bring platforms into home furnishing....Ikea is experimenting with city-centre and smaller shops as well as services such as home delivery and assembly. It is looking into renting out furniture instead of selling it, and smart home technology that brings it up against Silicon Valley.

Its platform initiative is one of its most important, albeit largely invisible to customers. Much still remains to be worked out such as just how much is common between different products — a dilemma recognisable from the car industry where Volkswagen faced complaints that there was little difference between VW and Skoda models except for the price.....standardisation should lead to lower prices for both it and customers. ....“How can we scale up in an efficient way? It’s difficult if we make each product uniquely. With platforms, it’s easier to adjust to new markets,” ...The new approach is not without risks though. Developing new platforms can be a costly business and in the car industry has often led to just as much complexity as before, particularly in companies like VW that are known for overengineering their vehicles, or confusion among consumers as to how big a difference there is between supposedly rival products.

Mr Loof is aware of the problem. “We need to define what makes sense to have on the platform and what not,” he says. “If you go too far you can arguably say you have decreased your range offer.”....for the furniture group, facing the same rapid changes in the retail landscape that have caused dozens of brands to fail, there is a feeling that it needs to do as much as it can even if it is likely to have failures on the way.
automotive_industry  CEOs  complexity  furniture  home_furnishing  Ikea  inspiration  platforms  retailers  risks  small_spaces  standardization  Torbjörn_Lööf 
october 2019 by jerryking
Lee Iacocca, car executive, 1924-2019
July 2, 2019 | Financial Times | by Kenneth Gooding 14 HOURS AGO
'80s  automotive_industry  CEOs  Chrysler  Detroit  Ford  obituaries 
july 2019 by jerryking
Robotaxis: can automakers catch up with Google in driverless cars?
January 31, 2019 | Financial Times | by Patrick McGee.

A new network of small tech companies could allow the car industry to compete with Waymo.

The automotive industry is among the most capital-intensive in the world: If the economy sours, assets turn into liabilities overnight as factories churning out thousands of cars begin to haemorrhage cash. So when toxic mortgage securities blew up in 2008, causing a recession, banks performed terribly — but carmakers fared even worse.

That is what makes auto consultants at Bain so worried. They fear that carmakers are about to be hit with a one-two punch: first, they project a US recession in the next 12 to 18 months. Then, increasing numbers of baby boomers will retire, causing a structural decline so big that, they warn, US car sales could shrink from more than 17m last year to just 11.5m by 2025 — the same level seen in 2008-09, which caused GM and Chrysler to go bankrupt and Ford to suffer a $14.6bn loss.....But there is hope. If carmakers play their cards right, they could be saved by what GM has called “the biggest business opportunity since the internet”. The potential saviour is the rise of shared, driverless “robotaxis”, which Bain expects to become mainstream in some large cities in six to eight years. This new market, virtually non-existent today, promises to be huge. ... Intel projects a “passenger economy” worth $7tn by 2050....Car brands typically earn $2,000 from a vehicle sale. That is just $0.01 per km over the lifetime of a vehicle, whereas for robotaxis “the potential is 20 to 25 cents per km”,...To realise this potential the industry will need to update its entire business model. The challenge for carmakers is to gain the expertise in self-driving algorithms, in-car entertainment, streaming services and fleet management for ride-hailing that will be central to this new era......Luckily, there has been an explosion of small companies developing the skills and technologies that carmakers can make use of. .......Waymo, the Alphabet self-driving unit that began as a Google project, is widely seen as the leader in this new landscape....it has built a commanding lead since its founding in 2009. And with at least 600 of its vehicles driving more than 25,000 miles a day, it is perfecting its algorithms in a way that could blindside the competition. Last year UBS projected that Waymo “will dominate” the operating systems for autonomous vehicles, taking “60 per cent of the total projected revenue pool in 2030”.......The threat of Waymo is not that it will build better cars. It has no need to. Instead it is ordering vehicles from Chrysler and Jaguar — effectively turning them into suppliers — and then fitting them out with self-driving software and hardware built in-house. But its potential goes beyond superior self-driving capabilities. Once robotaxis are mainstream, Alphabet can collect data from Google Maps and Search, entertain with YouTube and the Play Store, offer advice through Google Home smart speakers and use its software knowhow to manage fleets. Aside from the vehicle itself, Waymo is a vertically-integrated “closed system”........Carmakers are responding by partnering up like never before and making big investments to acquire new expertise. Volkswagen has linked up with Ford, while arch-rivals BMW and Mercedes have pooled their mobility efforts. In 2016 GM paid $500m for a stake in Lyft, the ride-hailing group, and it spent more than $1bn to buy Cruise, a self-driving company.......These deals, however, are merely the tip of the iceberg. Beneath the car brands, an entire ecosystem of niche companies has spurred into existence. Known as the “data value chain”, these groups specialise in the software, sensors, data processing and navigation needed to make autonomous cars a reality. None has the willpower, resources or vision to take on Waymo. Instead, they are forming clusters, exercising “swarm intelligence” to independently work towards the same collective goal of creating a safe, driverless experience......The implications of this ecosystem are profound. It suggests the carmakers can catch the likes of Waymo up without being the best-in-class in the new technologies. They merely need to be competent enough to know who is best — and then partner with them.
Alphabet  automotive_industry  automobile  autonomous_vehicles  Bain  blindsided  capital-intensity  GM  Google  large_markets  partnerships  supply_chains  Waymo 
january 2019 by jerryking
Dyson shifts HQ to Singapore to focus on cars
January 23, 2019 | Financial Times Michael Pooler and Peter Campbell in London and Stefania Palma in Hong Kong.

Move by billionaire’s business reflects strategy to be closer to customers and manufacturing centres....James Dyson’s decision to move his business headquarters to the other side of the world struck an odd note.

The switch to Singapore comes at a crucial juncture for his company, which is seeking to evolve from a household appliance brand to a manufacturer of electric vehicles. It is nothing short of his greatest gamble, which could secure his legacy or risk his fortune.....Dyson said it was simply for commercial reasons because most of its customers and all its manufacturing operations are in Asia, and to give management supervision over the construction of a car factory in Singapore that will be its largest investment to date......“This is to do with making sure we future-proof [the company],”......“What we’ve seen in the last few years is an acceleration of opportunities to grow from a revenue perspective in Asia.”......Dyson CEO, Jim Rowan insisted that the HQ move was not a bad omen for the UK, where Dyson ceased manufacturing in 2003, and pledged it would enlarge its 4,800-strong workforce there. “We’ll continue to invest in the UK,” said Mr Rowan, pointing out a proposed £350m expansion to one of two research and development centres in Wiltshire, south-west England, for autonomous vehicle testing.......far more likely that the move is linked to Dyson’s latest, and boldest, venture — its £2bn drive to break into the automotive arena. It has developed a UK site to test the vehicles, but also plans to expand its Singaporean research and development facilities, a sign that future vehicle work will take place closer to the manufacturing sites.....The company spreads its intellectual property around the globe, with about 1,500 of its 5,000 patents registered in the UK, according to data from patent research group Cipher. “Clearly if you have new business like cars that will generate significant IP,”.....A Dyson spokesman said the company had no intention of moving its current UK patents to Singapore.
Asia  automotive_industry  autonomous_vehicles  Brexit  Dyson  electric_cars  engineering  future-proofing  head_offices  intellectual_property  James_Dyson  manufacturers  patents  relocation  Singapore 
january 2019 by jerryking
Waymo’s driverless taxis are not free of labour costs
December 10, 2018 | Financial Times | Ashley Nunes.

After years of work, Waymo — Alphabet’s self-driving subsidiary — has finally unveiled its driverless taxi service. Dubbed Waymo One, it is available to locals in some Arizona suburbs. ....Competitors including Ford, General Motors and Mercedes hold similar aspirations. All three are expected to launch robotaxi services. For now, Waymo is leading and equity analysts are cheering.....A bigger problem for Waymo is its pricing. The company says fares are competitive with ride-hailing apps Uber and Lyft. However, they are lossmaking enterprises that rely on investors to subsidise fares. Self-driving technology is expected to change this by eliminating the cost of human drivers. But there is a problem. Waymo’s driverless cars arguably use even more human capital than the manned set-up employed by Uber and Lyft.

First, there is the safety driver. Every Waymo robotaxi has one. The company says these individuals, “supervise vehicles for riders’ comfort and convenience”. Additional support personnel are also on hand to answer rider queries — things like: “What if I want to change my destination during the trip?” There is also the fleet response team — a dedicated group of Waymo engineers whose job is to solve vexing road problems, such as what to do when a lane is blocked.
Alphabet  automotive_industry  autonomous_vehicles  Google  taxis  Waymo 
december 2018 by jerryking
Globalised business is a US security issue | Financial Times
Rana Foroohar YESTERDAY

there is a much broader group of people in both the public and the private sector who would like to reverse the economic integration of China and the US for strategic reasons..... a two-day event sponsored late last month by the National Defense University, which brings together military and civilian leaders to discuss the big challenges of the day. Dozens of experts, government officials, and business leaders gathered to talk about the decline in the post-second world war order, the rise of China, and how the US could strengthen its manufacturing and defence industries. The goal would be to create resilient supply chains that could withstand not just a trade war, but an actual war......“If you accept as your starting point that we are in a great power struggle [with China and Russia], then you have to think about securing the innovation base, making viable the industrial base, and scaling it all,”....Included on the event’s reading list was Freedom’s Forge, which outlines the role that US business — notably carmakers — played in gearing up the US for war in the early 1940s. At that time, because of the depth and breadth of the auto industry’s manufacturing and logistical might, the sector was viewed as being just as important to national security as steel and aluminium.

That is not to say the US security community is pro-tariffs or trade war .... But there is a growing group of thoughtful people who believe that American national security interests will require a forcible untangling of the investment and supply chain links between the US and China. They point to high-tech areas like artificial intelligence, robotics, autonomous vehicles, virtual reality, financial technology and biotech as important not only to the military but also for private sector growth.....While America’s military is still figuring out how make sure its supply chains are not controlled by strategic adversaries, the Chinese have played a much more sophisticated long game. The difference can be summed up in two words: industrial policy. China has one. The US doesn’t. The US has always steered away from a formal policy because critics see it as the government “picking winners”. But the Chinese don’t so much pick winners as use a co-ordinated approach to harnessing the technologies they need. They do it not only through investments and acquisitions but also through forced joint ventures, industrial espionage, and cybertheft [jk: predatory practices].....many multinationals were shortening their supply chains even before the current trade conflicts.

It is a trend that will probably speed up. Multinational companies, much more than domestically focused ones, will suffer collateral damage from tariffs. They will also be a major target of Chinese backlash. Anecdotally, this is already leading some groups to shift production from China to other countries, like Vietnam. If the military-industrial complex in the US has its way, those supply chains might move even closer to home.
adversaries  anecdotal  automotive_industry  books  China  China_rising  collateral_damage  co-ordinated_approaches  cybertheft  economic_integration  industrial_espionage  industrial_policies  military-industrial_complex  multinationals  predatory_practices  Rana_Foroohar  WWII  security_&_intelligence  supply_chains  trade_wars  U.S.  U.S.-China_relations 
july 2018 by jerryking
NAFTA is dead and Canada should move on
June 2, 2018 | The Globe and Mail | by PETER DONOLO.

So what is our Plan B?

It obviously means seriously and aggressively pursuing markets and investment beyond the U.S. For example, new markets for Canadian resources are now more important than ever. That’s why the government’s decision this week to effectively nationalize the Trans Mountain Pipeline in order to finally get it built and deliver oil to Asia-bound tankers was such an important step. This decision in itself was a significant response to an unreliable American partner, and a signal that we must look farther abroad for greater economic opportunity.

The same goes for the myriad of trade agreements on which our country has embarked – most prominently the Canada-EU trade agreement and the Trans-Pacific Partnership. The GATT and WTO breakthroughs of the 1990s also work in Canada’s favour, providing us with tariffs much lower than existed before NAFTA and the original Canada-U.S. free-trade agreement. If NAFTA were to cease tomorrow, our trade with the U.S. would still operate under the WTO’s rules.

Finally, we need to redouble efforts to attract direct foreign investment into Canada. The government recently launched a new agency, Invest in Canada, to do just that. But there are obstacles. The Business Council of Canada cites the regulatory burden as the biggest challenge. In a globalized economy, tax competitiveness is always an issue. And governments need to walk the walk when it comes to opening up to investors from countries such as China, even when there is domestic political blowback.

The only negotiating stance that works against Donald Trump is the ability and willingness to walk away. Mr. Trump sniffs out weakness or desperation – in a friend or a foe – and he pounces without mercy. A defensive crouch is the wrong position. “Sauve qui peut” is the wrong rallying cry. Negotiating with strength, from strength, is the only approach.
beyondtheU.S.  automotive_industry  crossborder  Donald_Trump  FDI  global_economy  Nafta  negotiations  Plan_B  oil_industry  pipelines  protectionism  tariffs  TPP  Trans_Mountain_Pipeline  walking_away 
june 2018 by jerryking
Ford CEO: Decision-Making ‘Shot Clock’ Needed to Accelerate Plans - WSJ
By Christina Rogers
Updated June 30, 2017

Ford Motor Co.’s new Chief Executive Jim Hackett is enforcing a “shot clock” on lingering decisions at the auto maker to put plans into action faster and regain competitive footing in vital segments of the car business.

Mr. Hackett, speaking to analysts this week, rolled out the shot-clock idea—which is borrowed from a rule employed in basketball to quicken the pace of the game—as part of his agenda for the first 100 days in a job he took over in May. He spoke Thursday with Wall Street analysts, the first such meeting for Ford’s new chief as he confronts an underperforming stock price.

The company has been widely criticized for appearing indecisive on important technology bets, including self-driving cars or electric vehicles.

In addition to setting firmer deadlines on decisions, Mr. Hackett said he plans to focus on costs, according to analysts’ reports recounting the event. He wants to move faster to target weaknesses in the business, such as slumping U.S. sedan sales.......Ford is now investing in autonomous-vehicle research, including taking financial stakes in startups, and is spending more than $4 billion to improve its electric-car lineup.
operational_tempo  decision_making  Jim_Hackett  Ford  automotive_industry  electric_cars  autonomous_vehicles  accelerated_lifecycles  clock_speed  indecision  shot_clock 
june 2017 by jerryking
The End of Car Ownership - WSJ
By Tim Higgins
June 20, 2017

Thanks to ride sharing and the looming introduction of self-driving vehicles, the entire model of car ownership is being upended—and very soon may not look anything like it has for the past century.

Drivers, for instance, may no longer be drivers, relying instead on hailing a driverless car on demand, and if they do decide to buy, they will likely share the vehicle—by renting it out to other people when it isn’t in use.

Auto makers, meanwhile, already are looking for ways to sustain their business as fewer people make a long-term commitment to a car.

And startups will spring up to develop services that this new ownership model demands—perhaps even create whole new industries around self-driving cars and ride sharing.

**Drivers: No more permanent arrangements**
The business of ride sharing may take on some new forms. Startups such as Los Angeles-based Faraday Future envision selling subscriptions to a vehicle (e.g. a certain number of hours a day, on a regular schedule for a fixed price).....Other companies are experimenting with the idea of allowing drivers to access more than just one kind of vehicle through a subscription.....Elon Musk has hinted that he’s preparing to create a network of Tesla owners that could rent out their self-driving cars to make money....Companies are already looking at how to market vehicles to overcome some of the possible psychological resistance to nonownership. Waymo, the self-driving tech unit of Google parent Alphabet Inc., has begun public trials of self-driving minivans in Phoenix for select users, with the eventual goal of testing them with hundreds of families.

**Big auto makers: Making peace with on-demand services**
As a result of both driverless cars and fleets of robot taxis, sales of conventionally purchased automobiles may likely drop. What’s more, because autonomous cars will likely be designed to be on the road longer with easily upgradable or replaceable parts, the results could be devastating to auto makers that have built businesses around two-car households buying new vehicles regularly. Currently, cars get replaced every 60 months on average...to get drivers to buy a vehicle of their own is to help owners rent out their vehicles,....GM is hedging all bets, investing in autonomous vehicles, Lyft, a car sharing service (Maven) and allowing Cadillac customers the ability to subscribe to ownership.

**New businesses: Helping to power a new industry**
....Autonomous vehicles could ultimately free up more than 250 million hours of consumers’ commuting time a year, unlocking a new so-called passenger economy, .....turn away from using the exterior of the vehicle as a selling point and focusing on making the interior as comfortable and loaded with features as possible.... turning cars into living rooms on wheels:.....Design firms will also cook up features designed to ease people into the practice of sharing rides regularly (with strangers).....allowing cars recognize to passengers’ digital profiles and become more responsive to their needs (caledaring, eating habits, etc.)....Existing industries may change to support an autonomous, shared future. For instance, the alcohol industry might see a rise in drinks consumed weekly with customers not having to worry about driving home,....Managing autonomous car fleets may be a new line of business for dealerships
automotive_industry  automobile  on-demand  autonomous_vehicles  end_of_ownership  Waymo  Tesla  sharing_economy  ride_sharing  start_ups  transportation  ownership  accessibility  Zoox  dealerships  Lyft  Maven  Reachnow  Getaround  subscriptions  Faraday  passenger_economy  connected_cars 
june 2017 by jerryking
Google vs. Uber: How One Engineer Sparked a War - WSJ
By Jack Nicas and Tim Higgins
Updated May 23, 2017

Anthony Levandowski started outside tech companies while working for Google, which alleges he took driverless-car secrets to a competitor.....Google parent Alphabet Inc. and Uber are embroiled in a legal fight over driverless-car technology, with Mr. Levandowski playing a starring role. The two firms, along with several other companies, are locked in a race to automate cars, a contest that could affect the future of transportation......Google’s approach [i.e. encouraging entrepreneurship amongst employees] helps it create new businesses, it also can spark disagreements between the company and its employees over who owns certain technology......Alphabet accuses Mr. Levandowski of stealing its trade secrets around driverless-car technology and bringing it to Uber, which he joined as its head of its driverless-car project last year after earning more than $120 million at Google. Alphabet has filed two arbitration claims against Mr. Levandowski and is suing Uber for allegedly conspiring with him.....
Google  Uber  automotive_industry  autonomous_vehicles  litigation  conflicts_of_interest  side_hustles  employment_contracts  intellectual_property  noncompete_agreements  start_ups  talent  Alphabet  trade_secrets  entrepreneurship  engineering 
may 2017 by jerryking
Growing a Different Apple - The New York Times
January 2, 2017 | NYT | By Vindu Goel

Founded in 2014 by three former senior managers from Apple’s iPod and iPhone groups, Pearl has tried to replicate what its leaders view as the best parts of Apple’s culture, like its fanatical dedication to quality and beautiful design. But the founders also consciously rejected some of the less appealing aspects of life at Apple, like its legendary secrecy and top-down management style.

The start-up, which makes high-tech accessories for cars, holds weekly meetings with its entire staff. Managers brief them on coming products, company finances, technical problems, even the presentations made to the board....Pearl’s siren song was appealing: Make the roads safer by giving tens of millions of older autos the same high-tech safety features that the newest models have.....Like Apple, though, Pearl is playing the long game. Engineers are already testing self-parking technology and other driver-assistance features for future products. So far, the company has raised $50 million from prominent venture capital firms, including Accel, Shasta Ventures and Venrock, but Mr. Gardner said it would need to raise more money in 2017.
Apple  alumni  design  detail_oriented  organizational_culture  accessories  automotive_industry  automobile  safety  Pearl  new_products  long-term 
january 2017 by jerryking
VC Pioneer Vinod Khosla Says AI Is Key to Long-Term Business Competitiveness - CIO Journal. - WSJ
By STEVE ROSENBUSH
Nov 15, 2016

“Improbables, which people don’t pay attention to, are not unimportant, we just don’t know which improbable is important,” Mr. Khosla said. “So what do you do? You don’t plan for the highest likelihood scenario. You plan for agility. And that is a fundamental choice we make as a nation, in national defense, as the CEO of a company, as the CIO of an infrastructure, of an organization, and in the way we live.”....So change, and predictions for the future, that are important, almost never come from anybody who knows the area. Almost anyone you talk to about the future of the auto industry will be wrong on the auto industry. So, no large change in a space has come from an incumbent. Retail came from Amazon. SpaceX came from a startup. Genentech did biotechnology. Youtube, Facebook, Twitter did media … because there is too much conventional wisdom in industry. ....Extrapolating the past is the wrong way to predict the future, and improbables are not unimportant. People plan around high probability. Improbables, which people don’t pay attention to, are not unimportant, we just don’t know which improbable is important.
Vinod_Khosla  artificial_intelligence  autonomous_vehicles  outsiders  gazelles  unknowns  automotive_industry  change  automation  diversity  agility  future  predictions  adaptability  probabilities  Uber  point-to-point  public_transit  data  infrastructure  information_overload  unthinkable  improbables  low_probability  extrapolations  pay_attention 
november 2016 by jerryking
London lives again: Inside the revival in Ontario’s rust belt - The Globe and Mail
JOHN IBBITSON
LONDON, ONT. The Globe and Mail Last updated: Friday, Feb. 05, 2016

Synergies between the education sector and the private sector lie at the very heart of Southwestern Ontario’s future. By incubating, encouraging and then feeding workers into London’s emerging high-technology sector, Western and Fanshawe are doing for their city what the University of Waterloo has long been doing for Kitchener-Waterloo’s computer-based industries and the University of Guelph is doing for bio-technology in Guelph.
John_Ibbitson  rust_belt  manufacturers  job_loss  revitalization  Southwestern_Ontario  entrepreneur  automotive_industry  UWO  Kitchener-Waterloo  synergies 
february 2016 by jerryking
Smartphones on wheels | The Economist
Sep 6th 2014 |

the rise of the “connected” car. This is the coming together of communications technologies, information systems and safety devices to provide vehicles with an increasing level of sophistication and automation. It is a process that will change not just how cars are used but also the relationship between a car and its driver. This, in turn, will affect the way vehicles are made and sold. Eventually, it is the connected car that may deliver a driverless future....Connected cars are a marriage of two types of mobile technology: the mechanical sort, which revolutionised transport in the 20th century, and the electronic variety, which has transformed telecoms in the 21st. A recent report by analysts at Citigroup, a bank, used data from IHS, a research firm, to divide the ways that mobile telecoms are influencing motoring into three useful groups.
technology  connected_devices  automotive_industry  connected_cars  smartphones  mobile_applications  location_based_services  LBMA  automobile  automotive  autonomous_vehicles 
september 2015 by jerryking
How Canadian startups are disrupting the auto industry - The Globe and Mail
CAMILLA CORNELL
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jul. 30, 2015
start_ups  automotive_industry  uWaterloo 
july 2015 by jerryking
You call this an auto strategy? - The Globe and Mail
JIM STANFORD
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Apr. 30 2015
industrial_policies  automotive_industry  Canada  Canadian  EDC  Mexico  Volkswagen 
may 2015 by jerryking
The Evolving Automotive Ecosystem - The CIO Report - WSJ
April 6, 2015| WSJ | By IRVING WLADAWSKY-BERGER.

An issue in many other industries. Will the legacy industry leaders be able to embrace the new digital technologies, processes and culture, or will they inevitably fall behind their faster moving, more culturally adept digital-native competitors? [the great game]

(1) Find new partners and dance: “The structure of the automotive industry will likely change rapidly. Designing and producing new vehicles have become far too complex and expensive for any likely one company to manage all on its own.
(2) Become data masters: “Know your customers better than they know themselves. Use that data to curate every aspect of the customer experience from when they first learn about the car to the dealership experience and throughout the customer life cycle. Having data scientists on staff will likely be the rule, not the exception.
(3) Update your economic models: “Predicting demand was hard enough in the old days, when you did a major new product launch approximately every five years. Now, with the intensity of competition, the rapid cadence of new launches, and the mashup of consumer and automotive technology, you may need new economic models for predicting demand, capital expenditures, and vehicle profitability.
(4)Tame complexity: “It’s all about the center stack, the seamless connectivity with nomadic devices, the elegance of the Human Machine Interface.
(5) Create adaptable organizations: “It will take a combination of new hard and soft skills to build the cars and the companies of the future. For many older, established companies, that means culture change, bringing in new talent, and rethinking every aspect of process and people management.
Apple  automotive_industry  autonomous_vehicles  ecosystems  Google  know_your_customer  adaptability  CIOs  layer_mastery  competitive_landscape  competitive_strategy  connected_devices  telematics  data  data_driven  data_scientists  customer_experience  curation  structural_change  accelerated_lifecycles  UX  complexity  legacy_players  business_development  modelling  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger  SMAC_stack  cultural_change  digitalization  connected_cars  the_great_game 
april 2015 by jerryking
Apple’s drive for world auto dominance spooks the industry - The Globe and Mail
GREG KEENAN, BRIAN MILNER AND OMAR EL AKKAD
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 20 2015,

Apple’s big advantage over traditional car makers is simple, yet hard to overcome, and it lies in the cloud.

The cloud consists of remote servers that store vast amounts of data and run applications, giving everyone on the planet with a connected device access to unlimited computing power essentially for free. It is also revolutionizing the way companies do business by instantly providing them with vast amounts of customer data. And it means Apple would not need to acquire car manufacturing capacity or build assembly and distribution networks in order to create chaos in the club.

It’s an advantage few traditional manufacturers, including auto makers, fully grasp, let alone have the ability to exploit.....“Apple thinks from the cloud out,” says Mr. McInerney, who would definitely line up for an Apple vehicle. At least then, he says, he would be assured of a better communications interface than the clunky one in his new upscale German model.

“If you’re an Apple or a Google, it allows you to use the same power to manage your supply chain that you use to manage your customers,” he says.

“That’s a revolution in thinking that allows you to identify all the cash-wait states [where money sits idle] and to collect a stunning amount of customer information in real time. Put the two together and you’re turning that information into cash at an accelerated rate. Car companies don’t think like that.”
automotive_industry  automobile  Apple  batteries  autonomous_vehicles  cloud_computing  connected_devices  layer_mastery  digital_first  data_coordination  incumbents  monetization  cash  customer_data  idle_funds  SMAC_stack  connected_cars 
march 2015 by jerryking
Redefining ‘made in China’: How one firm is forging a new path for manufacturers - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 30 2014 | G&M | NATHAN VANDERKLIPPE.

CFmoto has obsessed about quality, devoting nearly a fifth of its 1,350-person work force to research and development, and buying dozens of robotic CNC machines to sculpt its own key components. It has built dealer networks around the world – and sales, too. Eighty per cent of its revenues now come from exports

“We have a different way of thinking from others,” Mr. Lai said. “We want to create fun for our customers.”....China is already the world’s motorcycle factory. Last year, nearly 23 million were built by hundreds of Chinese companies – some sprawling state-owned enterprises, some barely larger than a backyard shed....But that business model is beginning to tatter, as South American and Eastern European consumers gain the wealth to buy cars, and competition steps in. ...“Now they’re looking another way at it – and mainly because of the threat from the Indian industry in their established markets.”....The Chinese situation is, of course, different: Where Japanese and Korean companies built their skill inside markets largely protected from foreign competition, China today is wide open to imported brands, which have been hugely successful. Cars bearing a mainland mark now account for only 23 per cent of sales.....But western markets have remained largely impenetrable: after years of splashy introductions at the Detroit Motor Show that date back to 2006, Chinese brands are no closer to making their big North American entrance....China’s experience with motorcycles, however, shows the distance it has to go. In their bid to increase quality, companies have outfitted their products with foreign-made suspensions, brakes and fuel systems....“demand for design is shifting” to Asia....He faults an inability among many Chinese firms to create their own identity, which can translate into a uniqueness that customers can latch onto.
China  manufacturers  motorcycles  design  value_chains  branding  brands  quality  automotive_industry  copycats  dealerships  distribution_channels 
december 2014 by jerryking
Nokia a lesson for backers of Canada’s nanny state - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 17 2014 | The Globe and Mail | BRIAN LEE CROWLEY.

How did it all go so wrong? And what might Canada learn from Finland’s downfall?

One obvious conclusion is not to put all your eggs in one basket, but it goes well beyond that. There was a time when economic change worked slowly enough that you could get a generation or two’s employment out of an industry before it was overtaken by innovation. Detroit dominated automobile manufacturing for many decades before its own complacency and the innovativeness of European and Asian producers came into play. In a similar vein, Nokia allowed itself to believe in its own infallibility, and Finland meekly followed suit. But the forces of change are now so powerful and lightning fast that sometimes a single product release from a competitor can signal the death knell of a previously healthy company or industry....Canada is rife with industries with their heads stuck in the sand, almost invariably because they believe they can shelter behind a friendly bureaucrat with a rulebook.

Examples abound in fields as diverse as telecoms, dairy, airlines, broadcasting, taxis and transport. Could there have been a bigger farce than the CRTC’s attempt to manhandle online content provider Netflix?...The real lesson of Nokia’s demise was that there is no substitute for being driven by what customers want, which is quality products and service at the lowest possible price...Every deviation from this relentless focus on what customers actually want makes your market a tasty morsel for the disrupters.
concentration_risk  Nokia  Finland  mobile_phones  disruption  Netflix  Uber  CRTC  complacency  accelerated_lifecycles  protectionism  nanny_state  customer_focus  change_agents  Finnish  demand-driven  lessons_learned  automotive_industry  downfall  change  warning_signs  signals  customer-driven  infallibility  overconfidence  hubris  staying_hungry 
october 2014 by jerryking
Lunch with the FT: Vikram Pandit - FT.com
July 11, 2014 | FT | By Tom Braithwaite.

“For a large group of people who grew up over the past two, three, four decades, they’ve been in a very different world – it was a world of predictable growth, it was a world of the ability to finance yourself, it was a world where you could really put one foot in front of the other. You find people grappling with what’s the new sustainable model for growth. And that is true of countries, it’s true of businesses.”
At the same time, Pandit proclaims that, largely thanks to technology, “It’s never been easier to start your own business.”
Our starters arrive. Beetroot and ricotta for Pandit while I get a plate decorated with delicious oily slivers of fish and vegetables offset by the occasional crunch from puffed rice and bite of horseradish.
“Bon appétit,” says Pandit, as he slices into a beetroot and continues to extol the virtues of something he calls the “SMAC stack”. I tell him this sounds awful but, he assures me, “it’s the vernacular for the ease for which you can get into business today,” and it stands for “Social media, Mobility, Applications and Cloud.
“Data is like . . . You’re too young, but there was a movie with the [line about] plastics.” When I assure him I’m familiar with The Graduate, he says: “Data is this generation’s plastics. I don’t see business models being truly successful until you get it.”...Pandit has a fondness for big concepts and management-speak and it can be difficult to bring him down to earth. I press him for examples. “You have large auto companies saying, ‘Where is the growth?’ and, on the other hand, you have a SMAC stack that’s created Uber. What’s interesting is that all those intangible abilities are inside the auto companies to make it happen.”
He has been investing in a steady stream of companies that he thinks embody innovative ideas that might make them the next Uber, the suddenly ubiquitous taxi-ordering app. At the same time, he is chairman of TGG Group, a consulting company set up by Steven Levitt, co-author of pop economics book Freakonomics – which aims to help corporations unlock their inner Ubers....Accordingly, while many of Pandit’s new investments are financial companies – Orchard, a platform for users to trade loans; CommonBond, a student lending platform; Fundbox, which lends money to small businesses against their invoices – only one, in India, has any aspirations to be a traditional bank.
With many of his new interests, Pandit says he is looking to remove “frictions”, which happen to be the way Citi and other banks make their money: for example, the middle men that sit between a big bond manager and retail investors and charge a fee. As he points out, the wealthiest individuals are not saddled with these costs to the same extent.
Vikram_Pandit  Citigroup  Wall_Street  career_paths  start_ups  financiers  financial_services  Sheila_Bair  fin-tech  Steven_Levitt  data  behavioural_economics  Second_Acts  reinvention  platforms  layer_mastery  data_driven  jargon  frictions  pain_points  large_companies  growth  Fortune_500  intangibles  SMAC_stack  automotive_industry 
july 2014 by jerryking
Intel’s Sharp-Eyed Social Scientist
FEB. 15, 2014 | NYT |By NATASHA SINGER.

Dr. Bell’s title at Intel, the world’s largest producer of semiconductors, is director of user experience research at Intel Labs, the company’s research arm. She runs a skunk works of some 100 social scientists and designers who travel the globe, observing how people use technology in their homes and in public. The team’s findings help inform the company’s product development process, and are also often shared with the laptop makers, automakers and other companies that embed Intel processors in their goods.
Intel  UX  anthropologists  semiconductors  observations  product_development  ethnography  consumer_research  anthropology  automotive_industry  laptops  social_science 
february 2014 by jerryking
New Technology, Computing Power Give Car Designers a Big Boost - WSJ.com
Oct. 20, 2013 | WSJ | By Mike Ramsey.

Advances in computer-aided engineering and big investments in computing power have given manufacturers new tools to create designs and the ability to test their ideas in a fraction of the time and at far less cost than they could before.

The result: Many more design ideas are being conceived and tested than ever before, and the best are being adopted quickly, helping manufacturers improve the fuel efficiency and the performance of cars, trucks, buses and motorcycles.
design  automotive_industry 
november 2013 by jerryking
Have Configurator, Will Sell Accessories
August 2010 | Ward's Dealer Business pg. 29 | by Steve Finlay
A study at more than 120 car dealerships indicates selling
accessories to new-vehicle buyers is enhanced by the right timing and a visualization of potential enhancements. In izmocars' study, car buyers were much more likely to buy accessories when using an online configurator allowing them to interactively customize their new car at the time of purchase.
One in two buyers using izmocars' AddOnAuto configurator purchased accessories, up from one in 10 before, the study indicates.
Dealers historically have struggled to
sell accessories. Dealership accessory sales account for 10%-17% of total sales in a S32 billion accessories market heavily dominated by independent chains and mail-order/online outlets.
"Dealerships actually have powerful, built-in advantages to 'own' far more of the accessories market than they do," says Sidney Haider, president of izmocars accessories division.
"Psychologically, consumers are far more likely to spend on enhancements at that exciting time of purchase, and the customer is physically in the showroom at that sweet-spot moment," he says.
automotive_industry  automobile  dealerships  accessories 
november 2013 by jerryking
Jonway Auto's Big Plans Points to Chinese Consolidation - WSJ.com
April 9, 2013 | WSJ | Rose Yu.

Overcapacity worries aren't confined to cars. China has a glut of factories in industries ranging from steel to construction equipment to solar panels. Beijing encouraged heavy investment in those industries to move away from its dependence on low-level manufacturing. While central government officials signal that they want to tamp down on capacity, local governments are still backing local champions that are major employers.

China's car-making capacity is set to soar in coming years. General Motors Co., GM +3.05% Volkswagen and Ford Motor Co F +2.50% . are building new factories and assembly lines. China's top 10 auto groups—which make both foreign and domestic brands—are expected to have combined capacity to build about 35 million vehicles a year by the end of 2015, according to their previous announcements, compared with 18 million vehicles in 2012.

But sales growth is slowing.
automotive_industry  China  overcapacity  consolidation 
april 2013 by jerryking
Car Companies Tap Data Trove - WSJ.com
March 7, 2013 | WSJ| By IAN SHERR And MIKE RAMSEY.
Drive Into the Future
Your car knows a lot about you. And it's talking....Automakers are exploring ways to use information form cars on the road to improve the driving experience, car design, fuel efficiency and financing, among other things...Improving safety, however, isn't the only way car companies can use that data. Mr. Koslowski estimates that by 2016, up to a third of all interactions between car companies and their customers will happen in the vehicle. Car companies, for example, could collect and analyze data about how customers use leased vehicles, and based on that information suggest other cars a driver might like around the time his or her lease is expiring, he says.

"They can notice all the vehicle seat belts are occupied and they can say, hey, maybe you want a family vehicle," Mr. Koslowski says....In the coming years, auto makers like Ford, Audi AG NSU.XE +0.34% and others see even more potential in big data. They envision taking information from customers' typical driving patterns, schedules and movements on the road to recommend routes the drivers might feel more comfortable with, either because they prefer city streets to freeways or don't respond well to bumper-to-bumper traffic.
massive_data_sets  automotive_industry  data  pattern_recognition  traffic_congestion  data_driven  product_recalls  social_media  telematics  customer_experience  UX 
march 2013 by jerryking
Advice helps firm turn down time into productive time - The Globe and Mail
BRYAN BORZYKOWSKI

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Wednesday, Jan. 02 2013
automotive_industry  data_driven 
january 2013 by jerryking
Change or die: could adland be the new Detroit?
Feb 18, 2011|Campaign |Amelia Torode (head of strategy and innovation at VCCP and the chair of the IPA Strategy Group) and Tracey Follows ( head of planning at VCCP)...

As the world changed with the globalisation of markets, the transformative power of digital technologies and a shift in consumer demand, the automotive industry and the city of Detroit did not. At a fundamental level, nothing changed. Detroit failed to adapt, failed to evolve.

We have started to ask ourselves: is adland the new Detroit?

Data: find stories in numbers

It's time to reimagine our role. We're no longer solving problems but investigating mysteries; no longer taking a brief, rather taking on a case. Like a detective, we start with behaviour, looking for patterns and anomalies. We assume that what we're being told is not entirely the "truth" so search for information that is given from various perspectives and tend to believe our eyes more than our ears.

Imagine the implications for how we approach data. Seen through the lens of "mystery", we're not simply seeing data as a stream of numbers but as a snapshot of behaviour and an insight into human nature. What we do with data is the same thing we do when we sit on a park bench or at a pavement café - people-watching,albeit from desktops. It's human stories hidden within numbers, and it takes away the fear that surrounds "big data".
shifting_tastes  data-driven  data_journalism  Detroit  advertising_agencies  data  storytelling  massive_data_sets  adaptability  evolution  United_Kingdom  Publicis  managing_change  sense-making  insights  behaviours  patterns  anomalies  assumptions  automotive_industry  human_experience  curiosity  consumer_behavior 
december 2012 by jerryking
Welcome to 'Moral Hazard' - WSJ.com
October 2, 2008 | WSJ | By DANIEL HENNINGER.

"Moral hazard" is an odd phrase. Its meaning isn't obvious though it does sound like something one ought to avoid. "Moral hazard" dates back hundreds of years in obscurity, but its use eventually settled inside the insurance business in the 19th century. The French call it risque moral.

Back then, it really was taken to mean that reducing risk too much exposed people to the hazard of poor moral judgments. If an insurer charged too little for a policy to replace farms in the English countryside, Farmer Brown might be less careful about cows knocking over oil lamps in the barn.

In time, the economists got their hands on "moral hazard," and the first thing they did was strip out the heavy moral freight to make the concept value-neutral. Now moral hazard became less about judgment and more about the economic "inefficiencies" that occur in riskless environments.

We're back to the original meaning. Losing tons of money for an institution is an economic inefficiency. Lose the nation's financial structure, however, and moral fingers get wagged.
moral_hazards  Daniel_Henninger  automotive_industry  TARP  inefficiencies  riskless  19th_century 
june 2012 by jerryking
Tire Recalls Show Flaws in the System - WSJ.com
November 1, 2007 | WSJ | By TIMOTHY AEPPEL

Poor Communication Means Potentially Dangerous Products Often Remain With Consumers And on Store Shelves....Notifying consumers is a problem in many kinds of recalls, in part because of the sheer volume of recall announcements. An average of 28 recalls are announced each week, says Dirk Gibson, an associate professor of communications at the University of New Mexico who studies recalls. Six separate arms of the government have the authority to do recalls, including the Food and Drug Administration, the Coast Guard and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
product_recalls  Communicating_&_Connecting  automobile  automotive_industry  RFID  Goodyear  Wal-Mart  Ford 
june 2012 by jerryking
globeadvisor.com: Right-brain ideas in a left-brain world
June 6, 2012
Fine arts degrees make ideal drivers for innovation and advancement in the corporate world, business leaders say. 'It changed the way I think'

JAMES MARTIN
creativity  humanities  innovation  automotive_industry 
june 2012 by jerryking
Ontario Biomaterials A Team_Brochure
The Ontario Biomaterials A-Team is a group of ten experts from seven Ontario universities. These top-rate, internationally recognized scientists are eager to work cooperatively with you and with each other. They understand the needs of industry including speed of service, confidentiality and respect for corporate ownership and exclusive access to intellectual property. Bob_Surgeoner's baby!!!
biomaterials  Ontario  scientists  Guelph  Colleges_&_Universities  automotive_industry  brochures  agribusiness 
may 2012 by jerryking
Finding a New Niche May Offer Better Chance at Fat Margins - WSJ.com
May 13, 2003 | WSJ | By JEFF BAILEY | Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
These days, with information and capital zipping around at warp speed, a business or industry with fat margins essentially has a target painted on its back.

And yet, plenty of small and midsize companies in less-than-glamorous industries manage, some year after year, to post enviable margins. Some have patents or other intellectual property that protect them from competition. Others have invested large sums in plant and equipment to acquire economies of scale that scare off new market entrants. Some defend themselves by knitting together extensive sales-and-distribution networks that would take years to replicate.
patents  intellectual_property  entrepreneur  business_models  dealerships  automotive_industry  barcodes  medical_devices  hospitals  niches  unglamorous  differentiation  proprietary  small_business  mid-market  barriers_to_entry  economies_of_scale  margins  warp_speed  defensive_tactics  distribution_channels 
may 2012 by jerryking
Adequate Due Diligence: Are You Sure?
Fall 2002 | Journal of Private Equity | by Michael J. Hausman.

Review of:
(a) Prior acquisitions and/or acquisition strategies;
(b) Profitability by product line;
(c) Historical and projected financial results;
(d) current status of the industry (or industries) in which the company operates;
(e) existing customer relationships.
automotive_industry  due_diligence  distressed_debt  restructurings 
april 2012 by jerryking
Google's Turn to Quake? - WSJ.com
April 4, 2012 | WSJ | By ROBERT HAHN.

Google's Turn to Quake? IBM and Microsoft fought antitrust authorities on multiple continents, even as they lost their fleeting dominance....Antitrust policy is built on the notion that market concentration, collusion or nasty behavior toward rivals undermines efficiency by allowing producers to charge more and to block innovation. That's not a bad rule of thumb for "old economy" industries. Before Japanese auto makers broke through the barriers, Detroit charged too much, divvying up most of the surplus between workers and managers. Worse—much worse—auto industry technology and productivity stagnated, as stakeholders sheltered their pockets of privilege from the winds of change.

But high-tech industries in general, and information technology industries in particular, are an entirely different sort of beast. Market concentration and huge profits are typically a consequence of economies of scale and returns to intellectual property, not monopoly power. (It costs no more to produce 10 million copies of Microsoft Office than 10 copies.) And while the management of the current crop of winning companies may be as eager as monopolists of yore to bar the doors to rivals, rapid technological change denies them the opportunity.
Google  IBM  Microsoft  antitrust  competition  competitive_landscape  increasing_returns_to_scale  collusion  market_power  corporate_concentration  monopolies  economies_of_scale  intellectual_property  automotive_industry  productivity  winner-take-all  market_concentration  technological_change  returns_to_intellectual_property 
april 2012 by jerryking
SAOIRSE32 :: Bill Cullen: self-made Irish millionaire :: June :: 2005
Bill Cullen: self-made Irish millionaire
Filed under: an príomhbhóthar

Telegraph

Born in the slums, reaching for the stars
(Filed: 08/06/2005)

Elizabeth Grice meets the self-made Irish millionaire who believes poverty is no barrier to success
Irish  entrepreneur  automotive_industry  dealerships  self-made 
november 2011 by jerryking
Does America Need Manufacturing? -
August 24, 2011 | NYTimes.com | By JON GERTNER. Interesting
article about how the U.S. is stumbling its ways towards a tepid,
stealth industrial policy with respect to the making of lithium-ion
batteries to support getting said batteries to be cost-effective enough
for use in electric vehicles.
manufacturers  industrial_policies  batteries  stealth  electric_cars  automotive_industry  MIT  cleantech  start_ups  unemployment  Michigan 
september 2011 by jerryking
THEY TRASH CARS, DON'T THEY? | More Intelligent Life
Paul Markillie goes along for the ride ...

From INTELLIGENT LIFE Magazine, Summer 2011
automotive_industry  automobile  testing 
july 2011 by jerryking
Which Cars Are Most Likely to Get Traffic Tickets? - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 20, 2010 Is Your Car Getting You More Traffic Tickets?
By JOSEPH B. WHITE

Quality Planning, a unit of Verisk Analytics, serves the insurance
industry by analyzing and verifying the claims motorists make when
applying for auto insurance. The company checks into such questions as
who is driving the car, how far it is likely to be driven, and where the
car is garaged overnight. It also digs into whether motorists are being
truthful about their driving records. All of this information and more
goes into calculating the insurance premium motorists are charged
speed  automotive_industry  insurance  analytics  automobile 
april 2011 by jerryking
RVs Map a Different Road Back - WSJ.com
* DECEMBER 27, 2010

RVs Map a Different Road Back by JAMES R. HAGERTY
RVs  automotive_industry  trucking 
march 2011 by jerryking
Auto Be Perfect - The Globe and Mail
Summer 2007 | Report on Small Business Magazine | OLIVIA STREN

$14.4 million, Nissan's cost to recall 131,000 cars for defective steering systems. $10,000 average cost of a SigPod.
automotive_industry  product_recalls 
february 2011 by jerryking
Mechanics Seek Out 'Right to Repair' - WSJ.com
FEB.10, 2011 | | by ANGUS LOTEN. Mechanics/ garage owners
hope the new small-biz.-friendly tone in Washington, will re-energize
the Right-to-Repair Act, a bill that levels the playing field with auto
dealerships. The bill, which has languished in Congress for nearly a
decade, requires auto makers like Ford, GM & Toyota, to supply
smaller repair shops with the same onboard-computer data they give to
their affiliated dealerships. Technology in newer vehicles controls
everything from the steering wheel to the fuel delivery system, brakes,
air bags, tire pressure and more. Supporters, including
auto-service-trade assocs., consumer groups & small-biz advocates,
say the move will boost competition in the auto-repair market, forcing
dealerships to lower prices....Auto makers aren't going to let this
happen w/o a fight, claiming all the necessary tools & diagnostic
data for any repair job are available online from individual auto
makers, as well as from tool mfgs. like Snap-on Inc.
automotive_industry  repairs  dealerships 
february 2011 by jerryking
SMS case study – Canyon Country Car Wash - Mobile Commerce Daily - Database/CRM
Objective
Competition became very stiff after the third car wash opened for
business. The objective of the mobile couponing initiative was to
compete with the two car-wash establishments located within a one-mile
radius.
mobile_e-commerce  automotive_industry  Awash 
february 2011 by jerryking
Auto Engineers Look Beyond Engines - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 16, 2010/ Wall Street Journal /By NEAL E. BOUDETTE.
In Effort to Boost Fuel Efficiency, Companies Tweak Other Components;
Ford's Electric Power Steering. ....inside the labs of many auto
companies, engineers have quietly started looking beyond the engine and
toward other components to reduce what is known in the industry as
"parasitic losses" of fuel-efficiency.

These include air-conditioning compressors, power-steering systems,
alternators and such. All of them need power to operate and
traditionally they draw that from the turning of the engine, usually via
a tangle of pulleys and belts. Together, they add up to a considerable
strain on the engine—and represent an opening for new fuel-saving
technologies.
automotive_industry  automobile  efficiencies 
november 2010 by jerryking
Booking Oil Changes Online
Dec 7, 2005. / Wall Street Journal pg. D.4 /Jennifer Saranow.
The car industry hopes the new online booking services will make the
process of scheduling service appt. easier and more convenient, and
encourage more customers to return to dealerships for service. Customers
who frequent dealership service depts are also more likely to remain
loyal buyers.

Many dealerships are offering discounts to encourage customers to use
the new service-booking tools (e.g. 10% off all services booked online).

Most of the new online scheduling options are at dealership Web sites,
and some, can also be accessed through manufacturer sites. With many of
the programs, customers also can see their personal service history and
booked appts. on personal password-protected Web pages...The move to
allowing immediate appointment scheduling is also part of a broader push
by the car industry to boost service visits with the help of new
technologies.
ProQuest  automotive_industry  automobile  online_scheduling  dealerships 
october 2010 by jerryking
What Detroit Can Learn From Silicon Valley - WSJ.com
JULY 13, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By ANDREW S. GROVE.
Vertically integrated production is a thing of the past. Will the auto
industry's new overseers catch on?
silicon_valley  Andy_Grove  Detroit  automotive_industry  vertical_integration  layer_mastery 
august 2010 by jerryking
D.I.Y. Detroit: A Hands-On Approach to Fixing the Auto Industry - Bits Blog - NYTimes.com
July 30, 2010 | New York Times | By ASHLEE VANCE. D.I.Y.
Detroit: A Hands-On Approach to Fixing the Auto Industry. Added
proposed new location for TechShop Detroit. Geeks, engineers and
do-it-yourselfers in Detroit will soon have a chance to take the future
of the American automotive industry into their own hands.
manufacturers  automotive_industry  DIY  Detroit  hacks  micro-factories  small_batch 
august 2010 by jerryking
Martinrea gears up for big drive into Europe
Jun. 09, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | GREG KEENAN Auto Industry Reporter
Martinrea  automotive_industry  international_marketing 
june 2010 by jerryking
Paul Ingrassia: The Lessons of the GM Bankruptcy - WSJ.com
JUNE 1, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by PAUL INGRASSIA.
Everybody knew it was ridiculous and unsustainable to pay UAW workers
not to work.
boards_&_directors_&_governance  automotive_industry  GM  Ford_Motor_Co.  moral_hazards  bailouts  unions  UAW 
june 2010 by jerryking
Vijay Govindarajan Pins Future Growth on Reverse Innovation
October 6, 2009 | — World Business Forum — Presented by Shell |
Vijay GovindarajanTo tap opportunities in emerging markets, companies
must excel at “reverse innovation”: develop products in countries like
China and India and then distribute them globally. Why? The fundamental
driver of reverse innovation is the income gap that exists between
emerging markets and the developed countries....Established automakers
are missing the opportunity. They have chartered their innovation
efforts for rich countries — and then offered the same cars, perhaps
de-featured to reduce costs somewhat, in poor countries....Yet far more
is at risk than missed opportunities for growth. Increasingly, success
in the developing world is a prerequisite to continued vitality at home.
In the transformed economic landscape, reverse innovation is not
optional — it is oxygen.
reverse_innovation  gurus  Vijay_Govindarajan  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  product_development  China  India  missed_opportunities  de-featured  automotive_industry  emerging_markets  developed_countries  jugaad  developing_countries 
may 2010 by jerryking
Manufacturing Bloom
December 7, 2009 | The National Review | by Noam Scheiber. The proletarian schlub who might just save American industry.
profile  manufacturers  automotive_industry 
may 2010 by jerryking
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