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jerryking : benefactors   14

Opinion | What Billionaires Don’t Understand About College Debt
Dec. 23, 2019 | - The New York Times | By Alissa Quart. Ms. Quart is the author of “Squeezed: Why Our Families Can’t Afford America.”
Anand_Giridharadas  benefactors  Colleges_&_Universities  high-impact  income_inequality  moguls  philanthropy  structural_change  tax-deductible  The_One_Percent 
12 weeks ago by jerryking
Pamela Joyner: collector of ‘Afropolitan abstraction’
SEPTEMBER 30, 2016 | FT| by Julie Belcove.

.....Joyner and Giuffrida are not merely acquisitive in the vein of so many collectors but are activist. “We think of ourselves as stewards of their careers,” Joyner says of their artists. “Our philanthropy is focused on getting works of the artists who we support into museums....Joyner and Guiffrida donate paintings to leading museums in the UK and the US. Joyner introduces those museum curators to talented-but-lesser-known artists for whom she advocates. She also organizes trips domestically and internationally (.e.g South Africa) for museum curators....Joyner and Guiffrida created an artist’s residency on their property in Sonoma, California, in 2014.....Artists return the loyalty and remark that Joyner and Guiffrida never ask for a discount....Joyner has made collecting — and sitting on boards — her primary occupation. “Now I have a strategy, I have a budget,” she says. “I run it like you’d expect an MBA to run it.”...“Race is a really bad lens through which to view art. I could make an argument that Zander Blom is far more African than I am.”....“I was really struck by these artists who were determined to create an aesthetic that was compelling to them, which was abstraction, and there were no rewards for that if you were an African-American artist at the time,” Joyner says. “The traditional art world expected African-American artists to create identifiably black subject matter. ....The daughter of two public school teachers, Joyner, 58, grew up on the South Side of Chicago, where she attended the prestigious University of Chicago Laboratory Schools and frequented the Art Institute of Chicago. A serious ballet dancer, Joyner took a year off from Dartmouth College to try to break into the professional ranks in New York. “What I discovered was, I was really average,” she says frankly. “That was a good thing to discover early. I decided at that juncture that I would become a patron of the arts.”

Patronage requires money, so Joyner went on to Harvard Business School, then a successful career in finance.....With 300 to 400 artworks by roughly 100 artists, among them contemporary masters Glenn Ligon, Julie Mehretu, Mark Bradford and Kara Walker, the collection is the subject of a new book, Four Generations: The Joyner/Giuffrida Collection of Abstract Art, written by a Who’s Who of top curators. In October 2017, a travelling exhibition of the collection’s highlights will open at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans.
art  collectors  women  African-Americans  curators  Diaspora  artists  museums  philanthropy  marginalization  leadership  patronage  high_net_worth  benefactors  cultural_literacy  Afropolitan  activism  race  HBS  abstractions  books  stewardship  Pamela_Joyner  contemporary_art  champions 
october 2016 by jerryking
Righting Wrongs and Generating Attention for Art of the African Diaspora
OCT. 16, 2016 | The New York Times | By TED LOOS.

A profile of Pamela J. Joyner, a prolific art collector and supporter of artists of African descent..... Later, Ms. Joyner donated money to buy another Gilliam, “Whirlirama” (1970), and next year there are plans to exhibit both when the Met reinstalls its modern collection. “Pamela is such an informed champion of her artists,” Ms. Wagstaff said.

That trip to Washington was one of the many ways that Ms. Joyner, 58, exerts her power as an art-world influence behind the scenes. She has relinquished a successful business career to become what she calls a full-time “mission-driven” collector of a very specific niche: Abstract art by African-Americans and members of the global African diaspora. Now she leverages her relationships with the Met in New York, the Tate in London, the Art Institute in Chicago and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art to help these artists gain traction in the wider world.

“It’s no less ambitious than an effort to reframe art history,” said Ms. Joyner, who sees herself as righting a wrong. “First, to include more broadly those who have been overlooked — and, for those with visibility, to steward and contextualize those careers.”....“There was a keen sense in my household that you had to be prepared for whatever was going to happen,” Ms. Joyner said. “You needed these literacies, and cultural literacy was one of them.”
African-Americans  Diaspora  art  artists  collectors  museums  overlooked  philanthropy  leadership  patronage  high_net_worth  benefactors  cultural_literacy  women  marginalization  Pamela_Joyner  stewardship  reframing  mission-driven  champions  art_history  exclusion  prolificacy 
october 2016 by jerryking
The Art of Being Unreasonable: Lessons in Unconventional Thinking By Eli Broad
We started by looking at some of the industry's most fundamental operating principles, what most people would call the basics. They represent the strongest, stickiest — and most unexamined kind of c...
conventional_wisdom  critical_thinking  quotes  moguls  unexamined  patronage  benefactors  assumptions  innovation  opportunities  Eli_Broad  thinking  unconventional_thinking  assessments_&_evaluations  unreasonableness 
february 2015 by jerryking
Renaissance man Joseph Rotman was a patron of education - The Globe and Mail
JANET MCFARLAND
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 27 2015

He and his wife, the former Sandra Frieberg, whom he married in 1959 and with whom he had two children, have long been known for their support for Canadian culture and arts.
Rotman  obituaries  UWO  philanthropy  institution-building  moguls  tributes  benefactors  uToronto  culture  cultural_institutions  patronage  education  Colleges_&_Universities  renaissance  Renaissance_man 
january 2015 by jerryking
Eli Broad's Entrepreneurial Approach to Philanthropy
September 13, 2013 | WSJ | By ALEXANDRA WOLFE.

Eli Broad's Entrepreneurial Approach to Philanthropy
Billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad on art, education and revitalizing Los Angeles....Mr. Broad describes his approach to philanthropy as entrepreneurial. Mostly, he says, "what I do is I bet on people." Mr. Broad himself spends most of his time identifying effective leaders—and then he invests in them and their ideas. He also spends millions of dollars each year coming up with metrics to reveal hard data about performance, and only continues funding a school or institution if it is showing signs of improvement....
...Eli Broad enjoys artists' thoughts on "the human condition." He talks to them about social and global issues, from the disappearance of the middle class to the crisis in Syria. The gap between the rich and poor bothers Mr. Broad, he says, and has been an impetus for his philanthropy. "Artists see the world differently than us businesspeople," he says. "If I spent all my time with bankers, lawyers and businesspeople, it would be kind of boring."
moguls  entrepreneur  Eli_Broad  Los_Angeles  philanthropy  benefactors  school_districts  achievement_gaps  metrics  museums  collectors  art  artists  artwork  art_galleries  patronage  the_human_condition 
september 2013 by jerryking
Forstmann's Not So Little Idea - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 10, 2011
Forstmann's Not So Little Idea
Ted Forstmann put his money behind the missing element in inner-city education: committed parents.
By DANIEL HENNINGER
Daniel_Henninger  private_equity  philanthropy  moguls  parenting  benefactors  Ted_Forstmann 
november 2011 by jerryking
Philanthropists Set Spending Deadlines - WSJ.com
MAY 21, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by SHELLY BANJO. A
growing number of philanthropists are adopting spending deadlines and
sunset provisions to ensure urgent global needs are addressed in a
timely way.

By granting the entirety of funds within a certain period of time, these
charitable efforts are looking to have a bigger immediate impact than
traditional foundations, which are typically set up to last forever and
pay out roughly 5% of assets a year.
philanthropy  Shelly_Banjo  benefactors  high-impact  impact_investing 
may 2009 by jerryking
When Donors Can't Keep Their Pledges - WSJ.com
JANUARY 27, 2009 WSJ column by SHELLY BANJO. Some
philanthropists are finding themselves unable to fulfill multi-year
pledges or continue annual contributions to charities they support.
Articles offers solutions.
philanthropy  charities  fundraising  economy  Shelly_Banjo  benefactors 
january 2009 by jerryking
Giving Till It Works - WSJ.com
Oct. 10, 2008 book review by Richard J. Riordan which looks at
the rise of billionaires who increasingly, are attempting to apply the
lessons of business success--monitoring investments, measuring
results--to their charitable efforts.
books  moguls  book_reviews  charities  entrepreneurship  capitalism  nonprofit  philanthropy  Eli_Broad  billgates  benefactors  passions  impact_investing  social_impact 
january 2009 by jerryking

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