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jerryking : big-box   36

Opinion: Is Toronto too downmarket for Eataly?
NOVEMBER 6, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | SYLVAIN CHARLEBOIS, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

The Eataly chain is like no other in food retailing. It’s an Italian-only food court on steroids: nine restaurants, a cooking classroom, a wine bar, a brewpub, a grocery area and even a mozzarella-making counter, all in one spot. After opening its first outlet less than 12 years ago, its first Canadian location opens in Toronto on Nov. 13.

Like other locations, the Toronto Eataly, which will be the chain’s 40th store, will be almost 50,000 square feet and will employ more than 300 people. It’s a massive food emporium, celebrating the best flavours and tastes Italy has to offer, but with a twist of domestic savoir faire.
big-box  cuisine  customer_experience  Eataly  grocery  Italian  Loblaws  retailers  supermarkets  Sylvain_Charlebois  Toronto  upscale  Westons 
november 2019 by jerryking
The incredible shrinking grocery store
NOVEMBER 8, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | RASHA MOURTADA.

Today's urban shoppers – whether they're 35 or 65 – are generally looking for two things in a grocery store: prepared food that tastes homemade and household staples such as paper towels and dishwashing detergent. They want a shopping experience that's more contained but still meets all their needs....Grocery store guru Paco Underhill on three trends he expects to see in North American supermarkets:

Hybrid stores: Think part traditional shopping, part Internet shopping. He expects customers to shorten trips by submitting shopping lists in advance to stores and selecting only certain items – produce and meat, for instance – themselves when they pick up their order.

Refillable containers: He expects a bulk shopping model – widespread today for dry goods – to take off for household supplies such as laundry soap, where shoppers will bring back large containers for refills.

Private label 'stores': Imagine all of Loblaws' President's Choice products in one spot within the store. "Rather than shelving these products throughout the store, they're concentrated in one area, so the shopper looking for the best price sees it all together," says Mr. Underhill.
big-box  boutiques  grocery  Highland_Farms  retailers  small_spaces  supermarkets  Wal-Mart  Paco_Underhill  trends  downsizing  prepared_meals 
october 2018 by jerryking
Despite Amazon effect, not all mom and pops in trouble on Main St.
Chris Morris, special to CNBC.com Published 8:53 AM ET Fri, 11 Aug 2017

With so many major retailers struggling to stay afloat, it'd be easy to think smaller, mom-and-pop stores are doing even worse, or might be largely fading away. The recent demise of retail giants, however, has left a brick-and-mortar vacuum for local stores to fill.

And many experts say it might be best to stay small. Being a micro-sized business certainly isn't protection against big-box retailers or online competitors, but being a small business that's an integral part of a local community can help build a loyal customer base.

"The vast majority of mom-and-pop businesses are either neighborhood retail businesses or small service businesses," says Leonard Schlesinger, Baker Foundation professor at the Harvard Business School. "As neighborhood businesses, they play a significant role in neighborhood stabilization, [providing convenience for people living close by]."
Amazon  big-box  mom-and-pop  retailers  e-commerce  ethnic_communities  convenience_stores  local  customer_loyalty  small_business  department_stores  neighbourhoods 
january 2018 by jerryking
Some Big Retailers Are Still Betting On Brick and Mortar
NOV. 14, 2017 | The New York Times | By MICHAEL CORKERY.

Target’s new store near Herald Square in New York City, down the block from Macy’s flagship store and other national retail chains. It is one of about 130 smaller format stores Target has opened or plans to open by the end of 2019. The new stores are scaled back versions of the big-box Targets that predominate in the suburbs.

The company’s store strategy stands out at a time when just about everyone seems to be questioning the relevance of brick-and-mortar retail. Amazon is seizing an ever-larger share of consumers’ wallets, reducing foot traffic to stores.....The retail industry has been pushing back against the pessimism. This summer, the IHL Group, a retail and hospitality advising firm, produced a report that showed retailers will open more new stores than they will close this year. (Most of the growth, however, came from restaurant openings, not new department stores or big box retailers.)....

“The negative narrative that has been out there about the death of retail is patently false,” Greg Buzek, the group’s president, said in August when the report was published.

Some of the biggest growth in brick-and-mortar stores is coming from discount retailers, like TJX, the parent company of T.J. Maxx and Marshalls. E-commerce may offer convenience and instant gratification. But shoppers are still willing to go into a store to hunt for a good bargain.“......The big challenge is how do you get customers to come into a store if they don’t have to,” said Melina Cordero, head of retail research for Americas at CBRE, the real estate firm.....Walmart is also trying to generate more buzz around its stores, which had drawn complaints from some customers in recent years for being too cavernous and unpleasant to shop in.

This month, Walmart is holding holiday parties — complete with toy demonstrations and workers in reindeer hats — as it “cranks up the volume on store experiences.”...Retailers like Walmart are hoping they can build a more profitable business that incorporates both brick-and-mortar and online shopping — a strategy known in the industry as “omni-channel.”

Online retailers like Amazon face high transportation costs, particularly as they guarantee free two-day and even same-day delivery. They are also bearing the cost of processing free returns.

Many analysts and retail executives said Amazon’s purchase of Whole Foods and its more than 460 stores validated the relevance of brick and mortar. Still, e-commerce continues to grow at a blistering rate, far outpacing the increase in overall retail sales. Unless that growth abates, analysts and economists question how so many stores — from suburban malls to hip boutiques — can survive.
retailers  Target  bricks-and-mortar  small_spaces  store_closings  big-box  CBRE  Wal-Mart  omnichannel  e-commerce 
november 2017 by jerryking
Costco Is Surviving in the Age of Amazon
By DAREN FONDA, Senior Associate Editor
From Kiplinger's Personal Finance, July 2017
Amazon  contra-Amazon  Costco  big-box  e-commerce 
september 2017 by jerryking
Toys ‘R’ Us versus Amazon: No contest
September 17, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | BARRIE MCKENNA.

It's a new era all right...The industry is grappling with the relentless onslaught of Amazon and Alibaba, excess retail space, the retreat of department-store mall anchors and intense price competition. Meanwhile, consumers are shifting their spending from things to experiences, including entertainment and dining-out
The harsh reality for Toys "R" Us and other big-box stores is that they aren't indispensable any more as North Americans discover new and different ways to shop. You don't have to schlep to a suburban shopping strip to find the newest Lego set, video game or electronic gadget. Order it online, and you can have it delivered to your door, often for free the next day, at the best price available anywhere.

....retail experts have warned that a tipping point was coming for the industry as more and more shopping moved online. This looks like the year.....Analysts predict that a record 9,000 retail stores will close across the U.S. in 2017. That would eclipse 2016, when roughly 6,200 stores closed....
Retailers have been filing for protection from creditors at a faster pace this year than at any time since the 2008-09 recession. Toys "R" Us joins a long list of famous retail casualties of 2017 in Canada and the U.S., including Sears Canada, The Limited, Wet Seal, BCBG, Payless Shoes, Sports Authority, Gymboree, Aéropostale and American Apparel. And there are still three-plus months to go.....The rise of Amazon is proof that consumers are embracing new ways of buying. The company's North American sales grew five-fold to $80-billion (U.S.) between 2010 and 2016. Half of U.S. households now subscribe to Amazon Prime, a fee-based service that offers free two-day shipping, music and video streaming plus other perks......What's alarming isn't so much the share of shopping that has moved online, but the speed at which it's moved.

Warren Buffett sold off nearly $1-billion worth of Walmart stock earlier this year, explaining that traditional retailing is "too tough" a business in the age of Amazon. "The world has evolved, and it's going to keep evolving, but the speed is increasing," Mr. Buffett said.

Amazon and China's Alibaba won't be the only winners in this new era. A vast array of other businesses feed off the online industry, including shippers and logistics companies, plus a vast network of technology companies, including store platforms (Shopify), analytics companies and app makers.
Amazon  Alibaba  e-commerce  store_closings  Barrie_McKenna  retailers  bricks-and-mortar  toys  Toys_"R"_Us  bankruptcies  brands  Amazon_Prime  home-delivery  accelerated_lifecycles  Warren_Buffett  Wal-Mart  big-box 
september 2017 by jerryking
Best Buy’s Secrets for Thriving in the Amazon Age
SEPT. 18, 2017 | The New York Times | By KEVIN ROOSE.

Here are the keys to Best Buy’s turnaround, according to Mr. Joly:

1. Price, price, price

The most worrisome trend in big-box retail was “showrooming” .....To combat showrooming and persuade customers to complete their purchases at Best Buy, Mr. Joly announced a price-matching guarantee....Price-matching costs Best Buy real money, but it also gives customers a reason to stay in the store, and avoids handing business to competitors.

2. Focus on humans

Mr. Joly also realized that if Best Buy was going to compete with Amazon, which has spent billions building a speedy delivery system and plans to use drones to become even more efficient, it needed to get better at things that robots can’t do well — namely, customer service & customer experience....Best Buy fixed its internal product search engine. It also restored a much-loved employee discount that had been suspended and embarked on an ambitious program to retrain its employees so they could answer questions about entirely new categories of electronics, such as virtual reality headsets and smart home appliances.....Customers had always loved Best Buy’s Geek Squad.....sometimes, people needed help before they bought big and expensive gadgets. So it started an adviser program that allows customers to get free in-home consultations about what product they should buy, and how it should be installed....a pilot program last year, the service is now being rolled out nationwide.

3. Turn brick-and-mortar into showcase-and-ship

Best Buy’s online ordering system was completely divorced from its stores. If a customer placed an order on the website, it would ship from a central warehouse. If that warehouse didn’t have the item in stock, the customer was out of luck.....Mr. Joly realized that with some minor changes, each of Best Buy’s 1,000-plus big-box stores could ship packages to customers, serving as a mini warehouse for its surrounding area. Now, when a customer orders a product on Best Buy’s website, the item is sent from the location that can deliver it the fastest — a store down the street, perhaps, or a warehouse five states away. It was a small, subtle change, but it allowed Best Buy to improve its shipping times, and made immediate gratification possible for customers. Now, roughly 40 % of Best Buy’s online orders are either shipped or picked up from a store.

Best Buy also struck deals with large electronics companies like Samsung, Apple and Microsoft to feature their products in branded areas within the store. Now, rather than jamming these companies’ products next to one another on shelves, Best Buy allows them to set up their own dedicated kiosks. (Apple’s area inside a Best Buy, for example, has the same sleek wooden tables and minimalist design as an Apple Store.) It’s a concept borrowed from department stores, and it’s created a lucrative new revenue stream. Even Amazon has set up kiosks in Best Buy stores to show off its voice-activated Alexa gadgets.

4. Cut costs quietly

Almost every business turnaround plan includes cutting costs. Best Buy has used the scalpel as quietly as possible, gradually letting leases expire for unprofitable stores and consolidating its overseas divisions, trimming a layer of middle managers in 2014, and reassigned roughly 400 Geek Squad employees within the company. No public rounds of layoffs, which can crater employee morale and create a sinking-ship vibe.

Best Buy has also found more creative penny-pinching methods. Once, the company noticed that an unusually high number of flat-screen TVs were being dropped in its warehouses. It revamped the handling process, reducing the number of times TVs were picked up by a clamp lift and adding new carts to prevent TV boxes from falling over. The changes resulted in less broken inventory and bigger profits.

5. Get lucky, stay humble and don’t tempt fate

It’s lucky that the products it specializes in selling, like big-screen TVs and high-end audio equipment, are big-ticket items that many customers still feel uncomfortable buying sight unseen from a website. It’s lucky that several large competitors have gone out of business, shrinking its list of rivals. And it’s lucky that the vendors who make the products it sells, like Apple and Samsung, have kept churning out expensive blockbuster gadgets.

“They’re at the mercy of the product cycles,” said Stephen Baker, a tech industry analyst at NPD Group. “If people stop buying PCs or they don’t care about big-screen TVs anymore, they have a challenge.”

Mr. Joly knows that despite Best Buy’s recent momentum, it’s not out of the woods yet. To succeed over the long term, it will need to do more than cut costs and match prices. Walmart, another big-box behemoth, is investing billions of dollars in a digital expansion with the acquisition of e-commerce companies like Jet and Bonobos, and could prove to be a fierce rival. Amazon has been expanding into brick-and-mortar retail with its acquisition of Whole Foods, and is moving into Best Buy’s home installation and services market....
“Once you’ve had a near-death experience,” he said, “arrogance, if you had it in your bones, has disappeared forever.”
penny-pinching  Amazon  Best_Buy  big-box  CEOs  turnarounds  pilot_programs  nationwide  brands  kiosks  cost-cutting  luck  Wal-Mart  Jet  Bonobos  pricing  showrooming  price-matching  customer_service  search_engines  in-home  BOPIS  Samsung  Apple  Microsoft  store_within_a_store  consumer_electronics  product_cycles  customer_experience  contra-Amazon 
september 2017 by jerryking
Diversification key for mall developers as retail landscape evolves
Feb. 7, 2017 | Retail Dive | by Kenneth A. Rosen and Eric S. Chafetz.

Traditional anchors like Sears/Kmart and Macy’s are beset by competition from all sides, from freestanding big-box outlets (think Home Depot and Bed Bath & Beyond), to stores attracting fashion-forward yet price-conscious consumers (Target and Kohl’s) to mounting online competition from Amazon and others.

This is leading to the loss of mall tenants, especially anchor tenants, which are major drivers of all-important foot traffic.....Mall owners are (or should be) rethinking the very definition of a mall. New tenants such as high-end restaurants, amusement parks, spas, health clubs, online pickup locations at traditional retailers and upscale movie theaters increasingly are essential components........Reshaping malls into mixed-used developments might run counter to a business model that worked for decades, where mall owners and developers could simply be mall owners and developers. However, these entities must realize that the need for new thinking and investment in new types of amenities and features is greater than ever to drive foot traffic......Technology is also key, with some mall owners now allowing customers to text them questions and get real-time answers. Other malls have implemented mobile apps to provide turn-by-turn navigation from store-to-store in a mall and directions to their parked cars. ........Consider a successful shopping center developer, in this case seeking opportunities for growth. The developer might look to acquire store leases at malls owned by competitors where an anchor has closed and redevelop the space into a cluster of smaller stores or into a mixed-use property (restaurants, movie theaters, urgent care centers, spas, etc.)......The transformation of malls will continue, and usher in changes that would have been unfathomable a decade ago. Last year, two mall owners — Simon Properties and General Growth Partners — teamed up with Authentic Brands and a few inventory liquidators to purchase hundreds of Aeropostale stores out of bankruptcy. The justification from the mall owners was that they were not merely trying to save a tenant, but based on the bargain basement price that they paid, believed they could make a profit. As 2017 unfolds with the expectation of additional retail Chapter 11s and store closures, mall developers and owners also may look at their competitors with an eye toward new opportunities.
diversification  redevelopments  shopping_malls  REITs  department_stores  big-box  cost-consciousness  e-commerce  Amazon  foot_traffic  reinvention  competitive_landscape  mapping  retailers  store_closings  offensive_tactics  transformational 
august 2017 by jerryking
At Luxury Stores, It Isn’t Shopping, It’s an Experience - WSJ
By Christina Binkley
April 16, 2017

What do luxury retailers in urban areas do when they face heavy pressure from the internet? Make their stores an experience. The high-end stores of tomorrow won’t try to compete with online retailers on price or convenience. Instead, they’ll do what many luxe shops are experimenting with now—turning themselves into destinations that customers go to visit instead of simply shop.....Stores will offer human connections, entertaining discoveries and dining options. And instead of being designed to feature one kind of inventory, the stores will function like pop-ups—completely changing what they offer from time to time, or even sweeping products aside to host community events......digital-native shoppers will determine how stores look and function, particularly in cities, where online alternatives with two-hour delivery windows are already plentiful.....

“Selling things isn’t going to be obvious. It’s going to be about selling experiences,” says John Bricker, creative director for Gensler, one of the world’s largest architectural firms with a global retail design practice......In some cases, retailers go so far to create destinations that they don’t even try to sell their signature products. The Gensler-designed Cadillac House in the lobby of the car maker’s New York headquarters is an art gallery and coffeehouse, with luxe white sedans on display by the entrance. People wander in for free Wi-Fi, then get familiar with the car brand by examining the vehicles, says Mr. Bricker. (The cars can’t be purchased there; legally, one must buy from a dealer.)....The strategy of providing a total experience is also spreading to independent retailers that aren’t aiming solely at high-end customers......These shifts are being followed by mass retailers as well. The idea: to move beyond the big-box strategy of the past—where companies built giant stores that people would go out of their way to visit—and build specially tailored stores in urban areas where customers live......Target recently decided to invest $7 billion in renovating its huge suburban stores and building new small-format urban stores, in a strategy to use the large stores as distribution centers for digital orders while creating a network of small city stores that will be located within easy reach of urban dwellers, both for offline shopping and picking up or returning online orders.

Brian Cornell, Target’s chief executive officer, says products will be selected for local populations by store managers who place orders from a catalog—less pet food and more snacks and notebooks for a store near a college campus, for instance.

Target looked at stores like Story in forming the strategy. “We learned a lot about agility,” from Story,
retailers  e-commerce  luxury  customer_experience  millennials  experiential_marketing  localization  merchandising  pop-ups  digital_natives  galleries  coffeehouses  brands  personal_connections  Target  agility  small_spaces  big-box  BOPIS  distribution_centres 
april 2017 by jerryking
Costco set to open its first Canadian office, business supplies store - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS
RETAILING REPORTER — The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016
Costco  big-box  disruption  e-commerce 
december 2016 by jerryking
Target Puts Some Food Suppliers on Back Burner
Several top suppliers summoned to Target Corp.’s headquarters early this year left digesting some difficult news: Their brands were no longer special. Representatives from Campbell Soup Co.,…
big-box  Target  grocery  CPG 
may 2015 by jerryking
Demise of Big Box Retailing in Canada
Arlene Dickinson
The demise of so many big box retailers in Canada leaves a real opportunity for entrepreneurs to fill the markets evolving needs. I believe that the future of bricks and mortar retai...
entrepreneur  opportunities  women  big-box  retailers  customer_experience  small_business  angels 
march 2015 by jerryking
The incredible shrinking retail sector - The Globe and Mail
BARRIE McKENNA
The incredible shrinking retail sector
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Feb. 12 2015

Entire categories of products are moving online, making many bricks-and-mortar stores redundant. Video and book stores are all but gone. Office supply, electronics and department stores are in retreat. A future without auto showrooms and movie theatres may be coming.

The era of the big-box store has peaked as city dwellers move back downtown, where space is at a premium.
Barrie_McKenna  retailers  size  mergers_&_acquisitions  downsizing  small_spaces  grocery  supermarkets  pharmacies  proximity  convenience_stores  store_footprints  post-deal_integration  bricks-and-mortar  consolidation  distribution_channels  Target  Wal-Mart  Loblaws  competitive_landscape  e-commerce  fresh_produce  perishables  big-box  supply_chains 
february 2015 by jerryking
Merchant Princes -
01.20.03 | Forbes.com | Bruce Upbin.

War has broken out over your home-improvement dollar, and Lowe's has superpower Home Depot (nyse: HD - news - people ) on the defensive. Its not-so-secret ploy: Lure women, because they'll drag their Tim Allen tool-guy husbands behind them. Home Depot is still very much a guy's chain. But women, according to Lowe's research, initiate 80% of all home-improvement purchase decisions, especially the big-ticket orders like kitchen cabinets, flooring and bathrooms. "We focused on a customer nobody in home improvement has focused on. Don't get me wrong, but women are far more discriminating than men," says Tillman, 59, a Lowe's lifer who rose to chief executive in 1996.
home-improvement  Lowes  Home_Depot  big-box  women  purchase_decisions 
december 2013 by jerryking
Wal-Mart expansion eggs on Canadian food fight
Apr. 24 2013 |The Globe and Mail | MARINA STRAUSS.

the most immediate threat isn’t so much the newest player, discounter Target Corp., which is getting a lot of attention as it opens its first stores here, but rather low-cost titan Wal-Mart Canada Corp. It has launched an aggressive $450-million expansion this year after snapping up former Zellers stores from Target, building up full food offerings in Wal-Mart supercentres while Target offers only a limited fresh food selection.....Ontario is ground zero for the fiercest food fight in years after Wal-Mart rushed last fall to open its new supercentres before Target rolled out its first 24 outlets in that province last month, with 100 more opening across the country in 2013.

An uncertain economy has put pressure on supermarkets such as Metro and industry leader Loblaw Cos. Ltd. to find new avenues of growth, including the burgeoning ethnic market.
...The grocers are also focused on improving their fresh offerings to serve as a key differentiator, investing in its distribution to ensure that products get to stores faster and stay fresh longer.

And they’re betting more on loyalty programs, trying to sway customers by offering them deals that are personalized for them, and in the process collect more data to monitor customer demands more precisely.
Marina_Strauss  food  retailers  ethnic_communities  Loblaws  supermarkets  Wal-Mart  Metro  grocery  Target  big-box 
may 2013 by jerryking
Staples looks to downsize 39 stores - The Globe and Mail
Staples looks to downsize 39 stores Add to ...

Marina Strauss

The Globe and Mail

Published Wednesday, Apr. 10 2013
Staples  downsizing  big-box  commercial_real_estate  Marina_Strauss 
april 2013 by jerryking
Wal Mart Supercenter Conversion
1 November 2012 | SSRN | Minha Hwang McGill University minha.hwang@mcgill.ca and Sungho Park Arizona State University spark104@asu.edu

1 November 2012
big-box  Wal-Mart  grocery  supermarkets  Nielsen  consumer_behavior 
march 2013 by jerryking
Meet the upscale gas station
April 4, 2012 |FORTUNE | By Dan Mitchell.

It's hard to imagine that gas stations will become "the next Whole Foods." But making them less unpleasant would be good business.

-- A new report concl...
gas_stations  convenience_stores  retailers  fresh_produce  pharmacies  big-box 
march 2013 by jerryking
Rona’s new chairman vows ‘quick return’ to profit - The Globe and Mail
SOPHIE COUSINEAU AND BERTRAND MAROTTE

MONTREAL — The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Jan. 21 2013
RONA  Quebec  turnarounds  retailers  hardware  overcapacity  big-box  Sophie_Cousineau 
january 2013 by jerryking
The Growing Cachet of the Store Brand - New York Times
By ELIZABETH OLSON
Published: November 27, 2005

Store brands now account for 16.1 percent of total supermarket purchases, worth $40.5 billion annually, up from 14.9 percent, worth $31.2 billion, in 1995, according to Information Resources of Chicago, which collects supermarket scanning data.

But Mr. Sharoff of the private-label association says the market shares of store brands could be twice that 16 percent figure because big-box retailers like Costco and Wal-Mart and specialty stores like Trader Joe's and Whole Foods did not report sales totals for their own labels. Some chains are offering more than one in-house brand. Safeway, for example, has created a signature brand of beef, Rancher's Reserve, and has been heavily promoting the brand to compete with higher-priced national brands.
private_labels  supermarkets  Whole_Foods  Trader_Joe's  big-box  retailers 
july 2012 by jerryking
Best Buy Details Store Closings - WSJ.com
April 14, 2012 | WSJ | By MIGUEL BUSTILLO.

Best Buy Details Store Closings
Best_Buy  big-box  retailers  consumer_electronics 
may 2012 by jerryking
Rona, other retailers thinking outside the big-box - The Globe and Mail
marina strauss — RETAILING REPORTER
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012
Rona  big-box  retailers  Marina_Strauss 
march 2012 by jerryking
Getting Goods on Store Shelves - WSJ.com
* MARCH 13, 2011

For entrepreneurs with products to sell, a wide range of sales channels
abound -- from boutiques to big-box stores to online marketplaces. But
identifying appropriate retailers -- and striking deals with them -- can
be a challenging first-time endeavor. Experts say the best strategy is
to research venues that are a strong fit and prepare a compelling and
succinct sales pitch.

*
By SARAH E. NEEDLEMAN
distribution_channels  Sarah_E._Needleman  small_business  shelf_space  big-box  retailers 
march 2011 by jerryking
Big-box competition forces malls to shape up - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 23, 2010 | Globe & Mail | by Sarah Boesveld.

Everyone in retail knows the customer is king. But malls that are shedding tenants have likely lost sight of the people they need to attract.

These malls must look far beyond current shoppers and target the ideal customer, says Mark Healy, partner at Satov Consultants, a Toronto-based management consultancy. Promoting cross-shopping - with a solid mix of retail that includes fashion, pharmacy, music, shoes and so on - can help attract families that may have fatter wallets than the senior citizens and teenagers who might be the more frequent customers as the mall declines, ......"It was 'Let's re-conceptualize what the mall is: Not simply a shopping destination, but a community hub.'" Enticing local physicians, community programs or the municipality to open offices in the mall can almost guarantee a boost in foot traffic, Mr. Healy says. "Look at everything from church groups to minor league soccer to parades and say, 'How do you leverage the mall as an anchor place?'"

Paired with a good mix of stores, it's a great way to get soccer moms roaming the malls when they pick up and drop off their kids, he adds. But the "mall as community hub" is more than just a strategy to drive traffic, he says. It gives the place an identity and builds a connection with shoppers, one that can be further forged if you try to weave local entrepreneurs into the mix of higher profile retailers,
anchor_tenants  big-box  cross-shopping  foot_traffic  reconceptualization  retailers  shopping_malls 
august 2010 by jerryking
Rivals Secretly Finance Opposition to Wal-Mart - WSJ.com
JUNE 7, 2010 |WSJ | By ANN ZIMMERMAN. Rival Chains Secretly
Fund Opposition to Wal-Mart. Saint Consulting Group is a specialist at
fighting proposed Wal-Marts, and it uses tactics it describes as "black
arts." Mr. Saint, a former newspaper reporter and political press
secretary, founded his firm 26 years ago. It specializes in using
political-campaign tactics—petition drives, phone banks, websites—to
build support for or against controversial projects, from oil refineries
and shopping centers to quarries and landfills. Over the years, it has
conducted about 1,500 campaigns in 44 states. Mr. Saint says about 500
have involved trying to block a development, and most of those have been
clandestine.
Wal-Mart  competitive_intelligence  retailers  clandestine  big-box  unions  countermeasures  counternarratives  political_campaigns  controversies  oil_refiners  dark_side  sophisticated  power_to_obstruct 
june 2010 by jerryking
What Color Is Your Poinsettia? - WSJ.com
December 14, 2006 | Wall Street Journal | By BART ZIEGLER.
Classic Red Christmas Plant, Gets a Psychedelic Makeover, Driving Some
Purists Batty. This year, big-box stores, independent garden centers
and supermarkets are offering poinsettias -- the potted plants long
associated with Christmas -- that have been sprayed with pigments or
dyes, dusted with glitter and even coated with metallic effects. These
treatments, said to be harmless to the plants, turn the normally red,
pink or white leaves into a riot of purple, blue, fuchsia, yellow,
orange, silver or gold....industry's chief problem: a decline in
interest in gardening and plants among younger consumers.
Sheridan  nurseries  horticultural  big-box  supermarkets  decline  innovation  competition  gardening 
february 2010 by jerryking
HOW LESSIONS LEARNED IN CANADA ARE FUELLING A $100-BILLION AMBITION
May 12, 2009 | Globe & Mail | by DAVID EBNER.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20090512.RBESTBUY12ART1933//TPStory/Business

Multiple brands in different businesses are not unusual.

In beverages, Coca-Cola Co. sells an array of products.

In the automobile industry, it's a hallmark of companies such as General Motors Corp. In retail, examples include Hudson's Bay Co., which operates higher-end Bay and lower-end Zellers stores.

In electronics, however, it can be more challenging to differentiate between brands. According to Best Buy Canada president Michael Pratt, the difference is in the details. "Anything that is customer-facing should be a different experience for the consumer," he said, referring to both the look of a store and the products.

In general terms, Best Buy's brand is positioned as a no-hassle electronics retailer, with ready-made packages and wider aisles designed to attract women (who appreciate having room to manoeuvre strollers or keep toddlers in tow, as well as being able to move around in a neat space without bumping into displays). Future Shop, in contrast, is the place for tech geeks.

While both brands sell computers and televisions, the selection isn't the same. More than 50 per cent of the models in various categories offered at Future Shop will be different from Best Buy.
lessons_learned  consumer_electronics  branding  Future_Shop  Best_Buy  big-box  sub-brands  customer-facing  brands  product_portfolios  Canada  Canadian  retailers 
may 2009 by jerryking
Shooting for the top shelf
June 18, 2007, G&M article by Marina Strauss. Specific
example of a trend towards higher-end hockey gear. Retailers cashing in
on the reinvention.
big-box  sports  fitness  private_equity  hockey  Marina_Strauss  Jack_Steckel  serial_entrepreneur  retailers 
february 2009 by jerryking

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