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Want to Future-Proof Your Career? Start by Reading These 10 Science-Fiction Books | Inc.com
July 18, 2017 | Inc. Magazine | By Jessica Stillman.

some of the smartest names in tech and entrepreneurship for a few recommendations to get you started:

(1) The Foundation Trilogy by Isaac Asimov. This recommendation comes from Elon Musk, who credits the trilogy with inspiring him to dream big and work hard in order to keep humans moving forward with technological progress.
(2) The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. This book is a favorite of both Richard Branson and Musk, who claims it taught him that "the question is harder than the answer."
(3) Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson. Reid Hoffman and Peter Thiel apparently spent a weekend discussing this highly influential novel before founding PayPal. It's also one of Sergey Brin's favorite books.
(4) Seveneves by Neal Stephenson. One of Bill Gates's favorite books, this massive novel about the imminent end of life on Earth "rekindled my love for sci-fi," says the billionaire, though he cautions that "some readers will lose patience with all the technical details."
(5) Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. This title is included in the MIT class mentioned above. Brueckner notes that "the devices [Dick] describes in his writings can be very humorous and satirical but are truly profound."
(6) Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card. According to Mark Zuckerberg's early Facebook profile, this popular tale of a video game prodigy who gets involved in a real-life war is one of his favorites.
(7) The Three-Body Problem by Ci Xin Liu. A slightly more mature Zuckerberg included this one by a Chinese sci-fi author in his book club picks. It's the first of a trilogy.
(8) New York 2140 by Kim Stanley Robinson. Peper's post is full of recommendations, including this one in which rising sea levels prompt "hedge fund managers and real estate investors to create a new intertidal market index. As climate change accelerates and the world economy becomes ever more concentrated in megacities, rethinking infrastructure becomes an ever more urgent priority."
(9) Change Agent by Daniel Suarez. Another Peper pick, this one explores the looming impacts of synthetic biology.
(10) The Last Firewall by William Hertling. VC's love sci-fi too. Brad Feld says his reading in the genre creates "a subconscious framework in my brain for a lot of the stuff I'm investing in." His blog is packed with recommendations, including this book, which he deems "spectacular."
billgates  books  Elon_Musk  future-proofing  novels  Peter_Thiel  Reid_Hoffman  science_fiction 
january 2020 by jerryking
Billionaires have never had it so good
November 13, 2019 | | Financial Times | by John Gapper

* Fortunes are created by technology and globalization, as well as talent and enterprise.
* The “smart risk-taking, business focus and determination” of rich entrepreneurs give them the ability “to transform entire industries, to create large numbers of well-paid jobs, and to rally the world to find cures for diseases such as malaria.
* billionaires have “an obsessive business focus, constantly scanning the world for new opportunities. And they are highly resilient, undeterred by failures and roadblocks.
* There are more entrepreneurs from middle-class backgrounds who went to elite universities before making their fortunes.

But such success would have been less lucrative in the past — they might have been merely rich rather than super-rich. Before lionising or demonising elite entrepreneurs, consider how their personal talents are amplified.

(1) the superstar effect. Globalisation and technology that allows businesses, such as Google and Facebook, to span markets, help the most successful entrepreneurs to profit faster and at greater scale. Successful founders can create superstar franchises, like some Hollywood stars in China....The economist Sherwin Rosen once noted that “superstar economics” mean the returns to the winner in any category can be vastly higher than the returns to second place. These winners can, as the economist Alfred Marshall commented in 1890, “apply their constructive or speculative genius to undertakings vaster, and extending over a wider area, than ever before”.
(2) The security effect (JCK: aka "long-term vision" or having a long-term time horizon). One reason why the poor stay poor is that they cannot plan for the long-term.....“the present takes up a great deal of [poor] people’s awareness, so they tend to delay investment decisions”. The reverse is true of billionaires, who can finance ideas over decades and ride out failures and setbacks. UBS says that “the outperformance we call the ‘billionaire effect’ depends on the entrepreneur keeping control [of a company]”, but they may be advantaged by security as much as genius.
(3) the insider effect. People do not turn into billionaires without a keen sense of financial opportunity and the drive to make a series of good decisions. But once they achieve positions of power, they are reinforced by a network of advisers and brokers.
Billionaires do not leave their cash at banks; UBS or other private banks handle it. They have insider access, such as the opportunity to invest in private businesses, or initial public offerings of fast-growing companies. Wealth does not automatically beget wealth but moving in elite financial circles with enviable resources helps.
(4) the tax effect. Many countries tax income higher than capital, because it is simpler and they want to encourage entrepreneurs. But this leads to the rich paying less as a share of their wealth than those on average incomes. Wealth is also mobile... billionaires have scope through trust and offshore structures to shield some of their wealth.

It is salutary that more of today’s super-wealthy built their own fortunes, but they are also lucky to live at an unusually helpful time in economic history.
billgates  Campaign_2020  capital_flows  Elizabeth_Warren  financial_advisors  high_net_worth  insiders  long-term  meritocratic  moguls  superstars  tax_codes  tax_planning  time_horizons 
november 2019 by jerryking
How Bill Gates reads books - YouTube
* Don't start a book you cannot finish.
* Concentrate. As you take in new knowledge, how does it attach to knowledge you already have?
* Dedicate at least an hour/day to the task of reading
billgates  books  howto  note_taking  reading 
august 2019 by jerryking
How the modern office is killing our creativity
March 14, 2019 | | Financial Times | by Pilita Clark.

Roger Mavity and Stephen Bayley, the design guru, have published "How to Steal Fire", ....a book on one of the most eagerly sought qualities in the business world: creativity. Companies buffeted by a storm of digital disruption and competitive pressures have embraced the need for creative thinking with gusto in recent years, which marks a turnaround......CEOs have talked ....about the importance of innovation (i.e. the implementation of new ideas), but far less attention has been devoted to figuring out how to foster creativity itself.....“The first thing that helps creativity is solitude,” “Creativity is essentially an individual rather than a collective activity.” Sir Isaac Newton was a case in point....The great thoughts that helped him go on to formulate the theory of gravity came after the Great Plague closed his university (Cambridge) and he spent nearly two years shut away in his home in Lincolnshire......When he was running Microsoft, Bill Gates used to head off by himself to a secluded hideaway twice a year for what he called Think Week.....Mavity says: “If you need to produce an idea, isolating yourself can be enormously beneficial.”......“How you do that in a big open-plan office with 100 other people trying to be creative at the same time?.......Solitude is in hopelessly short supply at a time when companies are captivated by the financial allure of the open-plan office and its evil twin, hot-desking. ....The idea that great creative thoughts come from teamwork, brainstorming and the ever-present away day is one of the “great myths” of creativity......the Ringelmann effect, named after a French engineer, Max Ringelmann, who first observed that individual productivity falls as group size increases. Away days can be useful for helping people get to know each other better, but not for generating ideas, said Mr Mavity. As his book puts it: “Brainstorming produces, at best, a light, irritating drizzle of complacent mediocrity.”....smart companies understand the need for focused concentration [JCK: sustained inquiry]...what should executives be doing to foster creativity?....“They have to walk the talk,” ....leaders need to set clear goals and then give people doing creative work the time, resources and autonomy to achieve them....Managers must be genuinely open to new thoughts and make sure good ideas are fostered. “None of it is rocket science or brain surgery,” “But you have to pay attention on a regular basis to whether people have these things.”
advertising  billgates  books  brainstorming  creativity  disruption  ergonomics  innovation  Isaac_Newton  myths  pay_attention  solitude  sustained_inquiry  teams  workplaces  ideas  open-plan 
march 2019 by jerryking
20 Minutes With: Bridge International Academies’ Shannon May
Feb. 25, 2019 | Barron's | By Mitch Moxley.

Bridge International Academies, a private company May co-founded that transforms failing government schools into high performing ones. The results have been astounding. May, an Arizona native in her early 40s, oversees the education of more than a quarter of a million children every school day in six countries. On average, these schools charge just US$7 per month per child, and some graduates have gone to elite secondary schools in the U.S.

Bridge is backed by Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg, among others, and has raised over US$140 million.

What was the original goal when you launched Bridge?

The original goal, seriously, was to serve a million kids in more than 1,000 schools…. It’s a lot harder than we thought, but 10 years on, now we’re working with close to 300,000 kids every day in six different countries.
billgates  China  education  high-achieving  PhDs  teachers  teaching  scaling  schools  transformational 
february 2019 by jerryking
Steve Jobs and Bill Gates: What happened when Microsoft saved Apple
29 Aug 2017 | CNBC | by Catherine Clifford.

Steve Jobs and Bill Gates' rivalrous friendship is the stuff of tech lore. The most poignant moment of that fraught relationship happened 20 years ago. In August of 1997, Gates stepped in and saved Apple, which, at the time, was on the brink of bankruptcy.

"Bill, thank you. The world's a better place," Jobs told Gates after the Microsoft exec agreed to make a $150 million investment in Apple.
Apple  billgates  Microsoft  Steve_Jobs 
december 2018 by jerryking
5 books worth reading this summer
May 21, 2018 | | LinkedIn| Bill Gates

Leonardo da Vinci, by Walter Isaacson. I think Leonardo was one of the most fascinating people ever. Although today he’s best known as a painter, Leonardo had an absurdly wide range of interests, from human anatomy to the theater...... A worthy follow-up to Isaacson’s great biographies of Albert Einstein and Steve Jobs.

Everything Happens for a Reason and Other Lies I’ve Loved, by Kate Bowler.

Lincoln in the Bardo, by George Saunders. I thought I knew everything I needed to know about Abraham Lincoln, but this novel made me rethink parts of his life. It blends historical facts from the Civil War with fantastical elements—it’s basically a long conversation among 166 ghosts, including Lincoln’s deceased son.

Origin Story: A Big History of Everything, by David Christian.

Factfulness, by Hans Rosling, with Ola Rosling and Anna Rosling Ronnlund.
billgates  books  booklists  Abraham_Lincoln  biographies  cancers  facts  Hans_Rosling  Leonardo_da_Vinci  origin_story  polymaths  summertime  Walter_Isaacson  Geoge_Saunders 
may 2018 by jerryking
Pam Edstrom Burnished the Image of Bill Gates and Microsoft - WSJ
“What business problem are we trying to solve?” she often asked. She also preached brevity. “Be brief, be bright and be done,” she sometimes advised colleagues before meeting with clients.
problem_definition  problem_framing  problem_solving  public_relations  brevity  obituaries  women  Microsoft  billgates  Silicon_Valley 
april 2017 by jerryking
Degrees of separation - FT.com
February 26, 2016 | FT | Jonathan Derbyshire.

The best work is created within an interaction between two subjects. Take Zuckerberg - computer science + psychology = billionaire. Even having a broad knowledge of various subjects enables an entrepreneur to flourish.

Moral of the story............keep learning.

ReportShare6RecommendReply
apt-get 1 day ago
@Sunny spot on. Liberal arts, STEM...these are just starting points. Continual learning and diversity of knowledge are considerably more powerful.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++
From David Brooks....Third, the age seems to reward procedural architects (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, etc. , people who can design an architecture/platform that allows other people to express ideas or to collaborate. Fourth, people who can organize a decentralized network around a clear question, without letting it dissipate or clump, will have enormous value. Fifth, essentialists will probably be rewarded--the ability to grasp the essence of one thing, and then the essence of some very different thing, and smash them together to create some entirely new thing. Sixth, the computer is the computer. The role of the human is not to be dispassionate, depersonalized or neutral. It is precisely the emotive traits that are rewarded: the voracious lust for understanding, the enthusiasm for work, the ability to grasp the gist, the empathetic sensitivity to what will attract attention and linger in the mind.
liberal_arts  STEM  billgates  Steve_Jobs  Colleges_&_Universities  CEOs  career_paths  cross-disciplinary  Vinod_Khosla  intellectual_diversity 
february 2016 by jerryking
In the Age of Information, Specializing to Survive - NYTimes.com
By J. PEDER ZANEMARCH 19, 2015

Artists from Picasso to Bob Dylan and entrepreneurs including Bill Gates and Steve Jobs changed the world by finding “radically new ways of looking at old problems,” Mr. Galenson said. “They cut through all the accumulated stuff — forget what’s been done — to see something special, something new.”

It is why, Mr. Galenson added, the historian and physicist Stanley Goldberg said of Einstein, “It was almost as if he were wearing special glasses to make all that was irrelevant invisible."
polymaths  Renaissance  information_overload  fresh_eyes  specialization  sense-making  reconceptualization  Pablo_Picasso  Bob_Dylan  billgates  Steve_Jobs 
march 2015 by jerryking
This Man's Job: Make Bill Gates Richer - WSJ
By ANUPREETA DAS and CRAIG KARMIN CONNECT
Sept. 18, 2014

Surprisingly, Mr. Gates has few technology-related investments. As of June 30, he held a 3.6% stake in Microsoft, worth about $13.9 billion based on Thursday's closing stock price.

Mr. Gates makes his own tech and biotech investments, which aren't held by Cascade. He started digital-image company Corbis Corp. in 1989. Smaller investments include stakes in nuclear-reactor developer TerraPower LLC and meat-substitute maker Beyond Meat.

Mr. Gates is updated on all the other investments every other month. "At the end of the day, all decisions go through Michael," says Mike Jackson, chairman and CEO of AutoNation, who considers Mr. Larson a friend. Mr. Larson is a director of the auto retailer, and Cascade owns a 14% stake in AutoNation valued at about $841 million.

Mr. Gates decided to hire Mr. Larson after the Journal reported in 1993 that the entrepreneur's money manager at the time had previously been convicted of bank fraud. ....After an extensive screening process, a recruiter invited Mr. Larson to meet Mr. Gates. The money manager had worked for a mergers-and-acquisitions firm and run bond funds for Putnam Investments, now a subsidiary of Canadian insurer Great-West Lifeco , Inc., before striking out on his own.
billgates  high_net_worth  money_management  AutoNation  family_office  wealth_management  real_estate  investing  personal_relationships  networking 
september 2014 by jerryking
Bill Gates is naive, data is not objective | mathbabe
January 29, 2013 Cathy O'Neil,

Don’t be fooled by the mathematical imprimatur: behind every model and every data set is a political process that chose that data and built that model and defined success for that model.
billgates  naivete  data  Cathy_O’Neil  value_judgements  datasets  biases 
december 2013 by jerryking
Venerable Format of ‘NewsHour’ Struggles With New Era of Media - NYTimes.com
By ELIZABETH JENSEN
Published: June 13, 2013

With a deep financing crisis forcing layoffs and other cutbacks this week, some public television employees believe that PBS NewsHour's current format — and a general unwillingness to embrace the digital realities facing journalism — may be jeopardizing the program’s future.... The pressures facing “NewsHour” are not unique. “What every traditional media organization is confronted with today is how to change profoundly to reflect the revolution in how people consume media,” said a former CNN bureau chief, Frank Sesno, now director of the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University. But many organizations have moved more quickly to adapt, equipping producers with inexpensive video cameras to reduce news gathering costs, and investing in online and mobile platforms.

Mr. Sesno said that he “desperately” wants “NewsHour” to succeed. “They’ve got to figure out how to do the deeper dive and bring people along with them,” he said, by developing more of a conversation with the audience and becoming a “multimedia information experience. You can’t just be a TV show anymore.”
billgates  cost-cutting  cutbacks  digital_media  digital_strategies  interactivity  journalism  layoffs  mass_media  multimedia  news  PBS  philanthropy  television 
june 2013 by jerryking
Book Review: Why Philanthropy Matters - WSJ.com
March 27, 2013 | WSJ | By LESLIE LENKOWSKY

A Buffett Rule Worth Following
WHY PHILANTHROPY MATTERS
By Zoltan J. Acs
(Princeton, 249 pages, $29.95).

entrepreneurs were as philanthropic as those born into wealth, if not more.

This surprising fact propels "Why Philanthropy Matters," by Zoltan J. Acs, a professor at George Mason University. Mr. Acs has spent his career studying how entrepreneurs operate and what role their business ventures play in the economy. In his new book, he focuses on another kind of contribution they make, one that, he argues, is as essential for prosperity as the products and services they create.

Successful entrepreneurship, he writes, requires a steady stream of innovations. The best places to develop them are privately funded research universities, medical centers and other kinds of institutions—like libraries and laboratories—that are insulated from competitive and political pressure. He cites, among other examples of nurtured innovation, the agricultural advances developed in land-grant universities during the 19th and 20th centuries and the contributions made to the information age by the students and faculty of Stanford University. As important as industrial research may be, the university has become, since the 1980s, "the source of new knowledge to be transferred to the private sector."

But there is more to the logic of entrepreneurial charity than hatching innovative ideas. As Mr. Acs notes, the success that certain entrepreneurs achieve when they disrupt old industries and establish new ones can bring big rewards, resulting in disparities of income and wealth. Without the philanthropy that would underwrite scholarships or other sources of opportunity, the public might not long tolerate such differences.

In "The Gospel of Wealth" (1889), Andrew Carnegie urged his prosperous contemporaries to avoid "hoarding great sums" and to give their "surplus" wealth away during their lifetimes, to strengthen an economic system that might thereby produce some riches for all. In the more measured tones of an economist, Mr. Acs is making much the same point: A capitalist economy not only enables but requires philanthropy. Through it, entrepreneurs can support the kinds of institutions that generate discoveries and that provide pathways for other people to make their own fortunes.

Mr. Acs buttresses his argument with a variety of examples, including those of billionaires—among them, Michael Milken and David Rubenstein —who have followed Bill Gates and Warren Buffett by committing themselves to giving at least half of their wealth to charity and whose charitable enterprises are aimed at creating opportunity for others. (Eli Broad, for instance, subsidizes charter schools and management reforms to improve urban education.) In Mr. Acs's view, America's ability to combine entrepreneurial capitalism and philanthropic uplift is rare among developed nations.
Andrew_Carnegie  billgates  book_reviews  books  capitalism  Colleges_&_Universities  creating_opportunities  David_Rubenstein  disequilibriums  disruption  Eli_Broad  entrepreneurship  innovation  knowledge_economy  moguls  Michael_Milken  philanthropy  society  Stanford  symbiosis  technology_transfers  Warren_Buffett 
march 2013 by jerryking
Bill Gates on the Importance of Measurement - WSJ.com
January 25, 2013 | WSJ | by Bill Gates.
(Charles Waud & WaudWare)
From the fight against polio to fixing education, what's missing is often good measurement and a commitment to follow the data. We can do better. We have the tools at hand.

Without feedback from precise measurement...invention is "doomed to be rare and erratic." With it, invention becomes "commonplace."
An innovation—whether it's a new vaccine or an improved seed—can't have an impact unless it reaches the people who will benefit from it. We need innovations in measurement to find new, effective ways to deliver those tools and services to the clinics, family farms and classrooms that need them....As budgets tighten for governments and foundations world-wide, we all need to take the lesson of the steam engine to heart and adapt it to solving the world's biggest problems...information [needs to] go into a system—part paper-based and part computerized—that helps decision makers see where things are working and to take action in places where they aren't....the most critical change we can make in U.S. K–12 education, with America lagging countries in Asia and Northern Europe when it comes to turning out top students, is to create teacher-feedback systems that are properly funded, high quality and trusted by teachers....The process I have described—setting clear goals, choosing an approach, measuring results, and then using those measurements to continually refine our approach—helps us to deliver tools and services to everybody who will benefit, be they students in the U.S. or mothers in Africa.
billgates  metrics  problem_solving  problems  dashboards  innovation  instrumentation_monitoring  data  tools  Ethiopia  goal-setting  goals  feedback  measurements  assessments_&_evaluations 
january 2013 by jerryking
Mr. Gates Queries His Peers - WSJ.com
November 9, 2007 | WSJ |ROBERT FRANK
Mr. Gates Queries His Peers
To Boost Giving, Foundation Backs Survey of Wealthiest
(1) The study, called The Joys and Dilemmas of Wealth and scheduled for release next fall,
(2) Paul Schervish, director of Boston College's Center on Wealth and Philanthropy.
(3) Wealth-management firms, luxury-product companies, magazines and car makers, as well as specialized research firms like Connecticut-based Prince & Associates and Chicago-based Spectrem Group, are all increasing their research to better understand the richest Americans.
(4) CCC Alliance, a Boston-based collective of families worth $100 million or more. It has also linked up with several philanthropy groups, such as the Wealth and Giving Forum.
billgates  high_net_worth  foundations  surveys  philanthropy  market_research  luxury  family_office 
august 2012 by jerryking
globeadvisor.com: FEEDBACK
BIG TROUBLE WITH BIG AG

Eric Reguly's column criticizing Bill Gates's recent advocacy of high-tech, genetically modified crops to combat food shortages generated much discussion among readers. One who's worked as a food and nutrition consultant with UNICEF, the World Health Organization and the World Bank said: On one of my trips to the wheat growing areas of Egypt, I found that the farmers use growing and storage practices which can best be described as medieval (JCK: archaic). A local official has estimated that between 30%-50% of the wheat and maize crops are wasted because of poor harvesting and storage techniques. If Egypt were able to have decent post-harvest handling systems, they would reduce their imports of wheat by about 30%. Another suggested that Bill Gates needs to talk to the small farmers who practise cheap, low-tech approaches to farming and not just the big agro-chemical multinationals.
agriculture  archaic  billgates  Egypt  Eric_Reguly  farming  genetically_modified  multinationals  smallholders 
may 2012 by jerryking
The Speechmaker: How Bill Gates Got Ready for Harvard - WSJ.com
June 8, 2007 (Link to Eric Reguly criticism of how Gates is addressing the problems of agriculture)

The Speechmaker: How Bill Gates Got Ready for Harvard
Warren Buffett Offered Tips on Delivery and Tone; A Dropout Gets a Degree By ROBERT A. GUTH

In the analytical style for which he became famous in high-tech circles, Mr. Gates recommended a four-point plan for attacking a complex problem: determine a goal, find the "highest-leverage approach," discover the ideal technology for that approach, "and in the meantime, make the smartest application of the technology that you already have."
public_speaking  speeches  preparation  billgates  Harvard  commencement  complexity  Microsoft  problem_solving  Communicating_&_Connecting  dropouts  leverage  complex_problems  return_on_effort 
may 2012 by jerryking
globeadvisor.com: The hunger game
April 27, 2012 | Report on Business | ERIC REGULY.
Bill Gates's recipe for boosting world food output may fatten Big Ag's bottom line, but what about small farmers?

The International Fund for Agricultural Development.

The problem is that there is ample evidence that the yield gains GM seeds produce are somewhere between overblown and negligible in many cases, and that GM foods have unknown effects on human and animal health because they haven't been subjected to long-term independent studies.

Problem: Smallholder farmers in developing countries who supply offshore corporations won't necessarily grow the diversity of crops needed by local populations. And farmers who depend on one crop are more vulnerable to financial ruin if a new disease, fungus or pest hits. Many small farms also don't earn enough income to pay for GM seeds and specialized crop-protection goop to go with those seeds.
billgates  Gates_Foundation  genetically_modified  Eric_Reguly  agriculture  productivity  farming  Monsanto  philanthropy  Nestlé  P&G  smallholders 
april 2012 by jerryking
Microsoft Co-Founder Hits Out at Gates -
MARCH 30, 2011 | WSJ.com | By NICK WINGFIELD And ROBERT A. GUTH
partnerships  Microsoft  billgates  Paul_Allen 
march 2011 by jerryking
Larry Summers Says "Tiger Mom" Amy Chua May Be Wrong - Davos Live - WSJ
January 27, 2011 By Jon Hilsenrath

His own children would be shocked to hear it, Mr. Summers said, but maybe Ms. Chua is wrong.

“In a world where things that require discipline and steadiness can be done increasingly by computers, is the traditional educational emphasis on discipline, accuracy and successful performance and regularity really what we want?” he asked. Creativity, he said, might be an even more valuable asset that educators and parents should emphasize. At Harvard, he quipped, the A students tend to become professors and the C students become wealthy donors.

“It is not entirely clear that your veneration of traditional academic achievement is exactly well placed,” he said to Ms. Chua. “Which two freshmen at Harvard have arguably been most transformative of the world in the last 25 years?” he asked. “You can make a reasonable case for Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg, neither of whom graduated.” Demanding tiger moms, he said, might not be very supportive of their kids dropping out of school.
Amy_Chua  billgates  WEF_Davos  education  Harvard  Larry_Summers  Mark_Zuckerberg  parenting  Tiger_Moms  commoditization_of_information  creativity  academic_achievement 
january 2011 by jerryking
Why do Bill Gates and Google love Salman Khan? - The Globe and Mail
Tim Kiladze
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2010 7:29PM EST
Last updated Friday, Nov. 26, 2010
billgates  Google  YouTube  web_video  education  mathematics  Salman_Khan  Khan_Academy 
december 2010 by jerryking
FT.com / Life & Arts - Lunch with the FT: Bill Gates
By Gideon Rachman

Published: October 30 2010 00:11 |
billgates 
october 2010 by jerryking
The man who’s tutoring Bill Gates
June 19, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Margaret Wente. Discusses
Vaclav Smil at the University of Manitoba. Prof. Smil’s 24th book,
Global Catastrophes and Trends: The Next 50 Years, has just been
published in Canada. It offers a numbers-heavy but compact guide to all
the main things we should be worrying about (or not), from natural
disasters to population trends.
billgates  books  Canada  catastrophes  catastrophic_risk  disasters  energy  environment  Margaret_Wente  natural_calamities  politics  worrying 
june 2010 by jerryking
Corner Office - Tachi Yamada and the Importance of Undivided Attention - Question - NYTimes.com
Feb. 27, 2010 | NYT | Adam Bryant's interview of Tachi Yamada,
M.D., president of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Global
Health Program.
* Don’t micromanage, but have microinterests.
* Every moment counts, be 100 % in the moment.
* Intelligence = complex abstract thinking = human relationships. Look
for people who’ve moved.
* Humour, is an underestimated and important value.
* Leadership, in order to connect with groups of people, requires giving
of yourself.
* Turn battleships by making directional commitments and staying the
course,
* In giving feedback, the positive messages get lost in the one negative
message, and the negative message gets garbled.
* Figure out what your North Star is.
* Be open to new challenges.
* If there are 10 tasks in an overall project, identify the most
critical task among those 10. What is the one thing that everything
else hinges on (i.e. the linchpin)? Invest time in understanding that one thing. Then,
if/when the problem occurs, it usually occurs there.
billgates  philanthropy  CEOs  linchpins  Managing_Your_Career  career  feedback  hiring  leadership  focus  slight_edge  rate-limiting_steps  affirmations  humour  commitments  priorities  bottlenecks  abstractions  moments  attention  North_Star  monotasking  mindfulness  living_in_the_moment 
march 2010 by jerryking
D Transcript: Gates, Jobs Reminisce - WSJ.com
MAY 31, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | Following is a transcript
of the interview Kara Swisher and Walt Mossberg conducted with
Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates and Apple CEO Steve Jobs at the D5
conference on May 30, 2007. How often is Apple on your radar screen at
Microsoft in a business sense?

Bill: Well, they're on the radar screen as an opportunity. In a few
cases like the Zune, if you go over to that group, they think of Apple
as a competitor. They love the fact that Apple's created a gigantic
market and they're going to try and come in and contribute something to
that.

Steve: And we love them because they're all customers.
transcripts  Kara_Swisher  Walter_Mossberg  billgates  Steve_Jobs  Apple  Microsoft  iPhone 
february 2010 by jerryking
Raising Bill Gates - WSJ.com
APRIL 25, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by ROBERT A. GUTH
Microsoft  billgates  family  profile  parenting  biographies 
april 2009 by jerryking
The Wealth Report - WSJ.com : Gates Studies the Rich
October 31, 2007, WSJ blog Robert Frank looking at the lives and culture of the wealthy.
* Boston College’s Center on Wealth and Philanthropy.
* The Gates Foundation studies the wealthy to boost charitable giving through better understanding.
philanthropy  Robert_Frank  billgates  The_Wealth_Report 
february 2009 by jerryking
Giving Till It Works - WSJ.com
Oct. 10, 2008 book review by Richard J. Riordan which looks at
the rise of billionaires who increasingly, are attempting to apply the
lessons of business success--monitoring investments, measuring
results--to their charitable efforts.
books  moguls  book_reviews  charities  entrepreneurship  capitalism  nonprofit  philanthropy  Eli_Broad  billgates  benefactors  passions  impact_investing  social_impact 
january 2009 by jerryking

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