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jerryking : blitzscaling   5

How to Navigate Investing in A.I., From Someone Who’s Done It
March 2, 2019 | The New York Times | By Katie Robertson.

Reid Hoffman, the co-founder of LinkedIn and a prominent venture capitalist, said at The New York Times’s New Work Summit in California that he looked very carefully at A.I. ventures to see how they were making new, interesting things possible and how he could bet on them early. He said current machine learning techniques, which are transforming fundamental industries, gave an amazing glimpse of the future.

“My ideal investing is stuff that looks a little crazy now and in three years is obvious or five years is obvious,” Mr. Hoffman said.....voiced some concerns around how A.I. could transform the global landscape, likening it to the shift from the agricultural age to the industrial age.

“You’ll see enormous changes from where the bulk of people find jobs and employment,” he said. “The first worry is what does that transition look like. That intervening transition is super painful.”....Mr. Hoffman recently released the book “Blitzscaling: The Lightning-Fast Path to Building Massively Valuable Companies,” which details his theory that the rapid growth of a company — above almost all else — is what leads to its success.
artificial_intelligence  blitzscaling  books  competitive_landscape  machine_learning  Reid_Hoffman  scaling  Silicon_Valley  start_ups  vc  venture_capital 
march 2019 by jerryking
16 lessons on scaling from Eric Schmidt, Reid Hoffman, Marissa Mayer, Brian Chesky, Diane Greene…
Chris McCannFollow
Community Lead @ Greylock Partners. Previously founded @StartupDigest. Photographer.
Dec 8, 2015
1. What “blitzscaling” means
2. Startup advice can’t be applied generally across stages
3. The top consideration of scaling is when to scale
4. Before product-market-fit hire slowly
5. Few things are critically important, most don’t matter (changes by stage)
6. One of the keys to get to scale, is to do things that don’t scale.
7. The reason to scale in the first place
8. The first level of scale is moving from one team to two teams (building and supporting)
9. Recruiting becomes the #1 priority when scaling
10. Have a framework for judging talent
11. Remember that even at scale, great products come from small teams
12. Hiring from the outside vs. promoting from within
13. Have a strong culture
14. Communication with 100's+ of employees is tough

15. Scaling is moving away from problem solving to coaching

Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn
From Jeff Weiner: On the continuum of Problem Solving <=> Coaching
Coaching — Founders tend to be people who are good at getting things done, therefore they look to solve problems rather than coaching people to solve them. The problem with this is when you add people into the organization — when they have a problem, if the founder solves it for them — they will keep coming back to the founders to solve problems.
This won’t scale. You have to coach people to solve their own problems. Then you need to coach people to coach other people to solve problems. This is how you get to true scale.

16. The role of a CEO during blitzscaling

Eric Schmidt, former CEO of Google, Executive Chairman at Alphabet
From Eric Schmidt: My role was to manage the chaos. There are different kinds of CEO’s and there is more than one answer.
venture_capital  lessons_learned  growth  scaling  howto  Reid_Hoffman  Silicon_Valley  blitzscaling  coaching  unscalability 
july 2017 by jerryking
Instagram Finds Focus Under ‘Efficiency Guru’
April 13, 2017 | WSJ | By Deepa Seetharaman

Ms. Levine’s biggest contribution, Mr. Systrom says, is helping Instagram avoid the fate analyst Ben Thompson described: “Companies break every time they double.” [See reference to sublinearity in new book of Geoffrey West, “Scale: The Universal Laws of Growth, Innovation, Sustainability and the Pace of Life in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies” (Penguin). Specifically, "infrastructure growth scales in analogous sublinear fashion]

In 2014, Mr. Systrom said he realized he and his co-founder, Mike Krieger, needed help to grow Instagram. Facebook had bought the startup for $1 billion two years earlier, when it had just 13 employees. The pressure was on for Instagram to make money and roll out products at a more rapid clip, and the co-founders saw the need for an executive to manage the expansion.

Marne Levine is “an efficiency guru” who has helped the Instagram app avoid some of the pitfalls of rapid growth. Ms. Levine has skills that are in high demand in Silicon Valley, where startups often struggle to get past their adolescence. Uber Technologies Inc., for instance, is seeking a second-in-command to help founder Travis Kalanick repair the ride-sharing company’s image after allegations of sexism and sexual harassment and the departure of several top executives. “We want to be the 10x company,” Ms. Levine, 46, says. “That means we need to think carefully about how we set up our operations, how we grow and how we scale.”.....A seasoned manager can instill discipline and order, helping new companies avoid wasting time and resources while adding a veneer of professionalism to attract potential customers.
Instagram  Facebook  focus  scaling  growth  Snap  Snapchat  expansions  COO  efficiencies  sublinearity  powerlaw  product_launches  speed  blitzscaling  operational_tempo  10x 
april 2017 by jerryking
Blitzscaling
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Blitzscaling
Tim Sullivan

FROM THE APRIL 2016 ISSUE

Let’s start with the basics. What is blitzscaling?
Hoffman: Blitzscaling is what you do when you need to grow really, really quickly. It’s the science and art of rapidly building out a company to serve a large and usually global market, with the goal of becoming the first mover at scale.

This is high-impact entrepreneurship. These kinds of companies always create a lot of the jobs and industries of the future. For example, Amazon essentially invented e-commerce. Today, it has over 150,000 employees and has created countless jobs at Amazon sellers and partners. Google revolutionized how we find information—it has over 60,000 employees and has created many more jobs at its AdWords and AdSense partners.

Why this focus on fast growth?
We’re in a networked age. And I don’t mean only the internet. Globalization is a form of network. It adds networks of transport, commerce, payment, and information flows around the world. In such an environment, you have to move faster, because competition from anywhere on the globe may beat you to scale.

Software has a natural affinity with blitzscaling, because the marginal costs of serving any size market are virtually zero. The more that software becomes integral to all industries, the faster things will move. Throw in AI machine learning, and the loops get even faster. So we’re going to see more blitzscaling. Not just a little more, but a lot more.
blitzscaling  economies_of_scale  scaling  HBR  high-growth  high-impact  Silicon_Valley  LinkedIn  Reid_Hoffman  networks  first_movers  large_markets  market_sizing  accelerated_lifecycles 
may 2016 by jerryking
Expertise in scaling up is the visible secret of Silicon Valley - FT.com
September 15, 2015 |FT| Reid Hoffman.

Most observers instinctively conclude that Silicon Valley is great because it has a unique ability to create start-ups. Most observers are wrong....Why does Silicon Valley continue to produce a disproportionate share of industry-transforming companies like Google, Facebook and LinkedIn? Or the next generation of companies like Airbnb, Dropbox, and Uber? The answer, which has been hiding in plain sight, is Silicon Valley’s ability to support scale-ups....Most of the impact and value creation in Silicon Valley actually occurs after the start-up phase ends and the scale-up phase begins.
Building great, world-changing companies requires more than just building a cool app and raising money. Entrepreneurs need to build massive organisations, user bases and businesses, at a dizzyingly rapid pace.....So what makes Silicon Valley so good at scale-ups? The obvious answers are talent and capital. Both offer a scale-up positive feedback loops. The competitor that gets to scale first nearly always wins. First-scaler advantage beats first-mover advantage. Once a scale-up occupies the high ground in its ecosystem, the networks around it recognise its leadership, and talent and capital flood in....talent and capital are necessary but not sufficient. The key success factor is actually a comprehensive and adaptable approach to scale. A scale-up grows so fast that conventional management approaches are doomed to fail. ...Change, not stability, is the default state at every stage and in every facet of the company. Continually reinventing yourself, your product and your organisation won’t be easy, but it will allow you to use rapid scaling as a strategic weapon to attain and retain market leadership.
blitzscaling  capital  change  constant_change  disproportionality  entrepreneur  expertise  first_movers  ksfs  networks  Reid_Hoffman  reinvention  scaling  Silicon_Valley  special_sauce  start_ups  talent  user_bases 
september 2015 by jerryking

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