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jerryking : bots   29

What’s Next for Company Chatbots - WSJ
By Sara Castellanos
Sept. 24, 2019 5:30 am ET
Early corporate adopters of chatbots, finding that the technology has saved them money, are working to improve them and exploring other areas where they could be put to use.

Chatbots use artificial-intelligence-based algorithms to understand and answer text or voice questions from customers and sometimes employees. Companies such as TD Ameritrade Holding Corp. , Ernst & Young LLP, Progressive Corp. and International Business Machines Corp. have rolled out chatbots in recent years and say they are seeing tangible benefits.

“It’s a key part of our strategy and we’ll continue to invest in it,” said Vijay Sankaran, chief information officer at brokerage firm TD Ameritrade.

Since it began offering text- and voice-based chatbots to clients in 2017, TD Ameritrade hasn’t needed to hire any new human agents, even though it has added many more clients, Mr. Sankaran said. Chatbots can answer basic questions about trade statuses and resetting passwords, while humans help with more complex problems related to taxes and beneficiaries.

Insurer Progressive offers text-based chatbots on Facebook Messenger and in apps; it plans to roll one out on its website later this year. Chatbots are expected to save the company about $5 million this year%
algorithms  artificial_intelligence  bots  chat  chatbots  complex_problems  conversational_commerce  IBM 
september 2019 by jerryking
Hard sell for the ad men
| Financial Times |

Consumer goods groups are cutting costs amid slowing growth – the advertising industry is first to feel the pinch
CPG  cost-cutting  shareholder_activism  advertising  Big_Food  advertising_agencies  P&G  bots  marketing  budgets  Unilever  ABInBev  Mondelez  WPP  Interpublic  brands  Nestlé  slow_growth 
august 2017 by jerryking
Three ways your business can leverage artificial intelligence - The Globe and Mail
CHRIS CATLIFF
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017

There are a multitude of ways most businesses can leverage AI but here are three:

1. Customizing the client experience

Recommendation engines (think Netflix) can personalize the customer experience, especially for front-line employees interacting with clients. Using data about our preferences, algorithms suggest and then employees filter with their emotional intelligence to offer highly customized recommendations. Recommendation engines boost revenue and will continue to play a pivotal role. For employees, AI simplifies decisions and eases work flow – a case of automation complementing the human element.

2. Accuracy in detecting fraud

AI-based systems, compared with traditional software systems used for detecting fraud, are more accurate in detecting fraudulent patterns. By using machine learning algorithms, companies can spot emerging anomalies in the data. Financial institutions are particularly vulnerable to cybercrime, where global losses from card fraud are expected to reach $31-billion in three years, and cyberattacks are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Security goals and customer experience goals need to be in sync for fraud prevention technologies to be effective.

3. Increasing client engagement

While "chat bots" are AI-based automated chat systems that can simulate human chat without human intervention, they are being extensively applied to revolutionize customer interactions. By identifying context and emotions in a text chat by the human end-user, chat bots respond with the most appropriate reply. In addition, chat bots, over time, collect data on the behaviour and habits of that individual and can learn their preferred behaviour, adapting even more to their needs and moods. By improving customized communication, customers are more likely to be far more engaged with your company.
artificial_intelligence  bots  chatbots  howto  fraud  fraud_detection  recommendation_engines  cyber_security  cyberattacks 
august 2017 by jerryking
The High-Speed Trading Behind Your Amazon Purchase - WSJ
By CHRISTOPHER MIMS
Updated March 27, 2017

Beneath the placid surface of product pages lies an unseen world of bots, algorithms, flash crashes and fierce competition......Just beneath the placid surface of a typical product page on Amazon lies an unseen world, a system where third-party vendors can sell products alongside Amazon’s own goods. It’s like a stock market, complete with day traders, code-slinging quants, artificial-intelligence algorithms and, yes, flash crashes.

Amazon gave people and companies the ability to sell on Amazon.com in 2000, and it has since grown into a juggernaut, representing 49% of the goods Amazon ships. Amazon doesn’t break out numbers for the portion of its business driven by independent sellers, but that translates to tens of billions in revenue a year. Out of more than 2 million registered sellers, 100,000 each sold more than $100,000 in goods in the past year....It’s clear, after talking to sellers and the software companies that empower them, that the biggest of these vendors are growing into sophisticated retailers in their own right. The top few hundred use pricing algorithms to battle with one another for the coveted “Buy Box,” which designates the default seller of an item. It’s the Amazon equivalent of a No. 1 ranking on Google search, and a tremendous driver of sales.
fulfillment  Amazon  pricing  back-office  third-party  bots  algorithms  flash_crashes  competition  retailers  e-commerce  product_category  private_labels  stockmarkets  eBay  Wal-Mart  Jet  Christopher_Mims 
march 2017 by jerryking
Stop the Bots From Killing Broadway - The New York Times
By LIN-MANUEL MIRANDAJUNE 7, 2016
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Broadway  bots  chatbots  playwrights  theatre 
june 2016 by jerryking
Bots, the next frontier
Apr 9th 2016 | The Economist

“chatbots”. These are text-based services which let users complete tasks such as checking news, organising meetings, ordering food or booking a flight by sending short messages. Bots are usually powered by artificial intelligence (hence the name, as in “robot”), but may also rely on humans.
bots  instant_messaging  mobile_applications  chatbots  artificial_intelligence  personal_assistants  virtual_assistants 
april 2016 by jerryking
Meet Viv: the AI that wants to read your mind and run your life | Technology | The Guardian
Zoë Corbyn
Sunday 31 January
Viv, a three-year-old AI startup backed by $30m, including funds from Iconiq Capital, which helps manage the fortunes of Mark Zuckerberg and other wealthy tech executives. In a blocky office building in San Jose’s downtown, the company is working on what Kittlaus describes as a “global brain” – a new form of voice-controlled virtual personal assistant. With the odd flashes of personality, Viv will be able to perform thousands of tasks, and it won’t just be stuck in a phone but integrated into everything from fridges to cars. “Tell Viv what you want and it will orchestrate this massive network of services that will take care of it,” he says.....But, Kittlaus says, all these virtual assistants he helped birth are limited in their capabilities. Enter Viv. “What happens when you have a system that is 10,000 times more capable?” he asks. “It will shift the economics of the internet.”....The future, as Etzioni sees it, belongs to the company that can make a personal assistant something like a good hotel concierge: someone you can have a sophisticated dialogue with, get high quality recommendations from and who will then take care of every aspect of booking an evening out for you.
artificial_intelligence  start_ups  Siri  orchestration  virtual_assistants  voice_interfaces  voice_recognition  personal_assistants  bots  chatbots 
april 2016 by jerryking
Waterloo’s Kik launches Bot Shop, opens platform to outside developers
Kik Interactive of Waterloo, Ont., is the latest tech company to expand its effort to become a platform for third-party bot makers in recent weeks.The chat app
Kik  platforms  bots  chatbots  Kitchener-Waterloo 
april 2016 by jerryking
Microsoft banks on bots to restore company’s mobile relevance - The Globe and Mail
SHANE DINGMAN - TECHNOLOGY REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Mar. 30, 2016

Mr. Nadella to describe how bots and machine learning tools are going to create a new “distributed computing fabric” that will vault Microsoft back into relevance on mobile platforms that are built and owned by rivals at Apple and Google. The theory is that if the App Store is owned by the phone makers, you go around the store with bots that live inside other popular mobile services....Everyone from Facebook and Slack to Amazon and Google are already vying to build the best hosts for these new bot services. Canadian messaging company Kik is among those making major investments in this bot-driven future that foresees commands to semi-artificially intelligent interactive chatbots expanding into everything from physical commerce (buying stuff at a shop with your phone, essentially) to controlling Internet of Things devices (texting your coffee machine to make an espresso). Microsoft showed off similar concepts on Wednesday, including a cupcake shopbot and a Domino’s Pizza bot that can deliver food to your location.
bots  Microsoft  platforms  Kik  CEOs  Satya_Nadella  distributed_computing  machine_learning  Azure  cloud_computing  software  intelligent_agents  chatbots 
march 2016 by jerryking
What Comes After Apps - WSJ
By CHRISTOPHER MIMS
Updated Feb. 22, 2016

The first and most intriguing alternative to apps is chat. This is hard to understand for anyone who hasn’t spent time in Asia or at least read about the dominance of WeChat and its competitors, but in China chat apps are used for everything from hailing a car to paying for your Coke at a vending machine.

Kik, a chat app that doesn’t get as much attention as rivals but for U.S. teens is on par with Facebook Messenger and Snapchat in terms of users and importance, will roll out similar functionality within six months, says Chief Executive Ted Livingston.

A growing share of these commercial chats take place with so-called chat bots—interactive computer programs that prompt users to select from among several options, for example. Imagine scanning a chat code on the back of the seat in front of you at a ballpark and having a brief conversation with a chat bot about how many and what kind of beers you want to order.

Chat, says Mr. Livingston, could manage most of the real-world interactions that previously would have required us to visit a mobile Web page, download an app, or—in some cases—give up in frustration with a phone’s constraints. Chat apps won’t solve the walled-garden problem of apps, but they could at least create lightweight interactions with services that happen in seconds and don’t require us to spend time downloading or loading anything.

A TechCrunch article in January indicated that Facebook will soon reveal similar technology within its Messenger app. At least at first, building chat bots that work on any chat app should be easier for developers, because they have similar interfaces. Chat, in other words, could become the new Web browser.
bots  chat  chatbots  Christopher_Mims  conversational_commerce  Facebook  Kik  lightweight_interactions  messaging  mobile_applications  walled_gardens  WeChat 
february 2016 by jerryking
Davos diary: A new angst settles over the world's elites - The Globe and Mail
John Stackhouse - Editor-in-Chief

Davos, Switzerland — The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jan. 24 2014,

Another machine revolution is upon us. There is a new wave forming behind the past decade’s surge of mobile technology, with disruptive technologies like driverless cars and automated personal medical assistants that will not only change lifestyles but rattle economies and change pretty much every assumption about work....For all the talk of growth, though, the global economy is also in an employment morass that has the smartest people in the room humbled and anxious. The rebound is not producing jobs and pay increases to the degree that many of them expected. Most governments are tapped out, fiscally, and can only call on the private sector – “the innovators” – to do more....If a 3-D printer can kneecap your construction industry, or an AI-powered sensor put to pasture half your nurses, what hope is there for old-fashioned job creation?

The new digital divide – it used to be about access, now it’s about employment – stands to further isolate the millions of long-term jobless people in Europe and North America, many of whom have left the workforce and won’t be getting calls when jobs come back.... Say’s Law--a theory that says successful products create their own demand.
creating_demand  Davos  John_Stackhouse  Say’s_Law  Eric_Schmidt  Google  McKinsey  creative_destruction  Joseph_Schumpeter  unemployment  machine_learning  disruption  autonomous_vehicles  bots  chatbots  artificial_intelligence  personal_assistants  virtual_assistants  job_creation  digital_disruption  joblessness  fault_lines  global_economy 
january 2014 by jerryking

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