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jerryking : bounties   10

Thomas Friedman’s Guide to Hanging On in the ‘Age of Accelerations’ - Bloomberg
by Paul Barrett
November 11, 2016,

Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist’s Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, $28)....the wisdom of pausing.... take time “to just sit and think”— a good reminder for the overcommitted.....Friedman's “core argument,” is his description of our disruptive times. By “accelerations,” he means the increases in computing power, which are enabling breakthroughs from 3D printing to self-driving cars. Meanwhile, globalization is creating vast wealth for those who capitalize on innovation and impoverishment for populations who don’t. All of this sped-up economic activity contributes to rising carbon levels, feeding the climate change that threatens civilization.....Friedman relishes catchphrases like “the Big Shift,” borrowed in this case from the HBR. He deploys B-school jargon to explain it, but the definition boils down to companies making the move from relying exclusively on in-house brainpower, patents, and data to exploiting “flows” of knowledge from anywhere in the world.... Friedman makes the case for changed policies to respond to the accelerations he chronicles.
accelerated_lifecycles  sustained_inquiry  Tom_Friedman  books  slack_time  reflections  3-D  globalization  impoverishment  climate_change  in-house  talent_flows  information_flows  GE  prizes  bounties  innovation  contests  contemplation  patents  data  brainpower  jargon  thinking  timeouts  power_of_the_pause 
january 2017 by jerryking
Software as Weaponry in a Computer-Connected World - The New York Times
JUNE 7, 2016 | NYT | By NICOLE PERLROTH.

On average, there are 15 to 50 defects per 1,000 lines of code in delivered software, according to Steve McConnell, the author of “Code Complete.” Today, most of the applications we rely on — Google Chrome, Microsoft, Firefox and Android — contain millions of lines of code. And the complexity of technology is increasing, and with it the potential for defects.

The motivation to find exploitable defects in widely used code has never been higher. Governments big and small are stockpiling vulnerabilities and exploits in hardware, software, applications, algorithms and even security defenses like firewalls and antivirus software.

They are using these holes to monitor their perceived enemies, and many governments are storing them for a rainy day, when they might just have to drop a payload that disrupts or degrades an adversary’s transportation, energy or financial system.

They are willing to pay anyone who can find and exploit these weaknesses top dollar to hand them over, and never speak a word to the companies whose programmers inadvertently wrote them into software in the first place.
adversaries  software  hackers  books  coding  vulnerabilities  exploits  software_bugs  bounties  black_markets  arms_race  cyber_warfare  cyber_security  Stuxnet  espionage  Iran  security_&_intelligence  malware  cyberweapons  weaponry  stockpiles  financial_system 
june 2016 by jerryking
F.B.I. Director Suggests Bill for iPhone Hacking Topped $1.3 Million - The New York Times
APRIL 21, 2016 | NYT | By ERIC LICHTBLAU and KATIE BENNER

The F.B.I. declined to confirm or deny Thursday whether the bureau had in fact paid at least $1.3 million for the hacking, and it declined to elaborate on Mr. Comey’s suggestive remarks.

But that price tag, if confirmed, appears in line with what other companies have offered for identifying iOS vulnerabilities.

Zerodium, a security firm in Washington that collects and then sells such bugs, said last fall that it would pay $1 million for weaknesses in Apple’s iOS 9 operating system. Hackers eventually claimed that bounty. The iPhone used by the San Bernardino gunman ran iOS 9.

“A number of factors go into pricing these bounties,” said Alex Rice, the co-founder of the security start-up HackerOne CTO, who also started Facebook’s bug bounty program. Mr. Rice said that the highest premiums were paid when the buyer didn’t intend to disclose the flaw to a party that could fix it.
bounties  FBI  hacking  encryption  James_Comey  iPhone  cyber_security  Apple  hackers  software_bugs  vulnerabilities  cryptography  exploits 
april 2016 by jerryking
Apple Policy on Bugs May Explain Why Hackers Would Help F.B.I. - The New York Times
MARCH 22, 2016 | NYT | By NICOLE PERLROTH and KATIE BENNER.

As Apple’s desktops and mobile phones have gained more market share, and as customers began to entrust more and more of their personal data to their iPhones, Apple products have become far more valuable marks for criminals and spies.....Exploits in Apple’s code have become increasingly coveted over time, especially as its mobile devices have become ubiquitous, with an underground ecosystem of brokers and contractors willing to pay top dollar for them (flaws in Apple’s mobile devices can typically fetch $1 million.)....Unlike firms like Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter, Mozilla, Uber and other tech companies which all pay outside hackers, via bug bounty programs, to turn over bugs in their products and systems, Apple doesn't do this. So it's not surprising that a third party approached the F.B.I. with claims of being able to unlock an iPhone--and not Apple.
black_markets  exploits  arms_race  FBI  bounties  cyber_security  Apple  hackers  software_bugs  vulnerabilities  cryptography  encryption 
march 2016 by jerryking
Tech Firms Crowd-Source to Fight Suits - WSJ.com
May 2, 2012 | WSJ | By JESSICA E VASCELLARO.

Article One Partners LLC crowd-sources evidence that a patent being challenged isn't novel. Proving so in court can invalidate a patent.

It's called finding "prior art" and has long been a core part of fighting patent cases. Now companies are trying a techie twist: describing the disputed technology online and giving awards of around $5,000 or so to those who find the best stuff, from photos to literary references to obscure foreign documents, to strike down the patent.
bounties  patents  patent_law  crowdsourcing  Jessica_E._Vascellaro  Microsoft  Apple  Article_One_Partners  self-employment 
may 2012 by jerryking
Prizes for Solutions to Problems Play Valuable Role in Innovation
January 25. 2007 | WSJ | By DAVID WESSEL.

Prizes aren't a panacea. They won't replace corporate R&D labs or universities. Some problems -- a cure for cancer -- are just too big. Some require too much upfront investment. Some scientists are reluctant to admit defeat and surrender a problem.

Moreover, the secrecy on which businesses insist to protect intellectual-property rights has its downsides: "People are in a black hole," says Harvard's Mr. Lakhani. "They don't know anything beside whether they won or lost." Losers' knowledge isn't widely shared.

But prizes work in ways that conventional R&D doesn't, and finding ways to spur innovation is crucial to improving how well we -- and our children and grandchildren -- live.
David_Wessel  innovation  InnoCentive  Netflix  incentives  contests  problem_solving  prizes  bounties 
may 2012 by jerryking
China’s Race for Patents to Build an Innovation Economy
Jan 1, 2011 | NYT | STEVE LOHR. China is trying to build an
economy that relies on innovation rather than imitation & intends to
engineer a more innovative society. The Chinese are focusing on
spiking the indigenous generation of “utility-model patents,” which
typically cover items like engineering features in a product & are
less ambitious than “invention patents.” China intends to roughly
double: (a) its # of patent examiners, to 9,000, by 2015. (The U.S. has
6,300 examiners); & (b) the # of patents that its residents &
companies file in other countries. To lift its patent count, China has
introduced incentives including cash bonuses, better housing for
individual filers & tax breaks for companies that are prolific
patent producers...DESPITE China’s inevitable rise, Kao says, the U.S.
has a comp. adv. because it is the country most open to innovation,
forgiving failure, tolerating risk & embracing uncertainty,” “the
future lies in being the orchestrator of the innovation process,”
competitiveness_of_nations  John_Kao  China  patents  industrial_policies  innovation  innovation_policies  Steve_Lohr  taxonomy  Silicon_Valley  bounties  orchestration  incentives  risk-tolerance  prolificacy 
january 2011 by jerryking
10 Million Reasons To Give Barrick A Hand With Its Silver
September 19, 2007 Canadian Press article by ANDY HOFFMAN
discussed how Barrick is offering $10-million (U.S.) to anyone who can
help the company extract the 180 million ounces of silver at its
Veladero gold mine in Argentina. Barrick's problem at Veladero is no
laughing matter. The gold in the deposit is relatively easy to mine but
the silver is sheathed in an impermeable layer of silica and has
resisted traditional processing methods such as leaching with cyanide.
Barrick  mining  silver  gold  prizes  bounties  innovation  contests 
february 2009 by jerryking

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