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jerryking : boutiques   27

GMP Capital’s sale to Stifel Financial marks the end of an era on Bay Street
December 6, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | ANDREW WILLIS.

On Friday, the GMP era effectively came to an end. U.S. investment bank Stifel Financial Corp. closed its purchase of the Toronto-based brokerage for about $65-million, and plans to rename it..........GMP started out as a partnership and later became a public company that was always far smaller than global dealers, and firms that Canadian banks started acquiring in the late 1980s.
For Canada’s financial community, saying goodbye to GMP means closing the door on a way of doing business, a lucrative and often colourful approach to deal-making. GMP brought together capital-starved entrepreneurs and deep-pocketed fund managers. The partners put up their own cash – mortgaging homes or draining savings – to fund the operation. GMP was the first to raise money for businesses that became some of Canada’s best known, such as Blackberry Ltd., Birchcliff Energy Ltd., Canopy Growth Corp. and Goldcorp Inc. It is also a major trader in their shares......In extremely simple terms, independent firms such as GMP run on relationships and ideas. Larger rivals are creatures of process and scale. The biggest players have now come to dominate capital markets........the four Day 1 GMP partners: the late Brad Griffiths, mining financier Gene McBurney, trader Mike Wekerle, now a venture capitalist and reality TV star, and salesman-turned-CEO Kevin Sullivan......The new model for independent dealers in Canada is to be small and nimble, or focus on wealth management. The model that worked so well at GMP – using commissions from stock trading to cover day-to-day costs, and taking the lucrative fees from advisory work as profits – doesn’t work when brokerage houses offer to trade stocks for free. GMP’s run is unlikely to be matched.
Andrew_Willis  Bay_Street  boutiques  brokerage_houses  compensation  deal-making  exits  farewells  GMP  investment_banking  nimbleness 
6 weeks ago by jerryking
The incredible shrinking grocery store
NOVEMBER 8, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | RASHA MOURTADA.

Today's urban shoppers – whether they're 35 or 65 – are generally looking for two things in a grocery store: prepared food that tastes homemade and household staples such as paper towels and dishwashing detergent. They want a shopping experience that's more contained but still meets all their needs....Grocery store guru Paco Underhill on three trends he expects to see in North American supermarkets:

Hybrid stores: Think part traditional shopping, part Internet shopping. He expects customers to shorten trips by submitting shopping lists in advance to stores and selecting only certain items – produce and meat, for instance – themselves when they pick up their order.

Refillable containers: He expects a bulk shopping model – widespread today for dry goods – to take off for household supplies such as laundry soap, where shoppers will bring back large containers for refills.

Private label 'stores': Imagine all of Loblaws' President's Choice products in one spot within the store. "Rather than shelving these products throughout the store, they're concentrated in one area, so the shopper looking for the best price sees it all together," says Mr. Underhill.
big-box  boutiques  grocery  Highland_Farms  retailers  small_spaces  supermarkets  Wal-Mart  Paco_Underhill  trends  downsizing  prepared_meals 
october 2018 by jerryking
The dumb-bell economy: inside the booming business of exercise
FEBRUARY 9, 2018 | FT | Jo Ellison.

Where once consumers looked for acquisitions to express their status, our spending habits are shifting towards more holistic expenditures. In the past 20 years, the leisure industry has emerged as one of the most dynamic, disruptive and fashionable of forces. It’s all part of a new focus on the “lifestyle experience”, a trend that has possessed consumers and found luxury brands spiking with sporty new offerings — sneakers, leggings, apps and accessories — designed to harness the burgeoning market. As Harvey Spevak, the executive chairman and managing partner of the Equinox group, likes to say: “Health is the new wealth.”
.....2019 will see the first Equinox hotel opening in New York’s Hudson Yards, the first in a rollout of Equinox hotels earmarked for billions more in investment. The hotels will be founded on the same full-service ideal as the clubs. “Our vision for the hotels is to cater to the high-performance traveller,” says Spevak, “and we think about it as we do, historically, from a science perspective. We call it MNR — movement, nutrition and recovery — where a high-performance lifestyle and a healthy lifestyle is a three-legged stool.”.....as our lives have become busier, atomised and more urban, the gym has emerged as the new place in which to gather: to be part of a community....not only are millennials more likely to buy gym memberships, they’re driving the boutique business as well. The rise of the group workout, club membership and all of the attendant accessories that come with it have become part of the new language of “wellness”......Where you work out, who you work out with, and what you wear to work out in have become totems of fashionability. Spevak traces the first shoots of the wellness trend to 9/11, when he saw a jump in the number of people becoming focused on holistic health and taking care of themselves.
....But more than anything, the fitness boom must be a corollary of a digital revolution in which working out has become a ubiquitous feature of our online life; ....Minton agrees that a gym’s success depends on cultivating this tribal loyalty, delivering a unique experience and then selling product that marks its members out. “Some of the most interesting clubs are those that are expanding into less obvious areas,” he says. “We now have over 600 boutiques across the UK and they are growing faster than traditional gyms as they have a smaller footprint and can take pop-up spaces.......The experiential market is throwing a lifeline to retailers, as well. “The fashion link is growing,” adds Minton. “Fitness apparel brands like Lululemon, Sweaty Betty, Reebok, Nike all now offer free in-store workouts, which provide them with an opportunity to market their brand lifestyles more directly and forge a connection with the consumer.”.......“The demise of retail is a permanent shift,” says Spevak. “It doesn’t mean retail’s going to go away, but it’s going to look very different. The consumer, in my opinion, will continue to buy nice things for themselves, but I think in the scheme of priorities the experience is more important than the handbag.”
fitness  exercise  London  United_Kingdom  gyms  wellness  rollouts  strength_training  boutiques  leisure  Equinox  millennials  experiential_marketing  small_spaces  pop-ups  non-obvious  upscale  retailers  in-store  digital_revolution 
february 2018 by jerryking
A Rainmaker Seeks to Grow His Firm at a Time of Big Media and Tech Deals - The New York Times
By MICHAEL J. de la MERCEDDEC. 17, 2017

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rainmakers  John_Malone  moguls  dealmakers  investment_banking  boutiques  Wall_Street 
december 2017 by jerryking
Financial PR spins a new global story — FT.com
MAY 6, 2016 by: By Shannon Bond and James Fontanella-Khan in New York and Arash Massoudi in London

Leading financial communications companies from New York to Hong Kong are responding to growing demand for “whisperers” with global, political and digital nous. Nowadays, PR firms are expected to craft a corporate narrative that works across different markets, to handle complex relations with governments whose interests often diverge and to provide rapid-response crisis management.
crisis_management  Wall_Street  London  Communicating_&_Connecting  boutiques  public_relations  government_relations  consolidation  financial_communications  rapid-response 
may 2016 by jerryking
The brokerage bust: Why Bay Street will never be the same - The Globe and Mail
NIALL MCGEE
TORONTO The Globe and Mail Last updated: Saturday, Feb. 06, 2016
boutiques  Bay_Street  failure 
february 2016 by jerryking
What Scented Candles Say to an Economist - The New York Times
By DIANE COYLE NOV. 7, 2015

We need a wider variety of indicators to help us take a more accurate reading of the economy. Some of these might seem frivolous, but paying close attention to worldly detail could make forecasting more reliable.
(1) height of hemlines
(2) the number of cranes visible on the skyline
(3) Spending on luxury items is another example. During a boom, sales of fast cars, expensive paintings, prime real estate and diamond necklaces all soar, as do their prices.

Less obvious are trends in retailing. When the good times roll, people decide that their great idea for a specialty store is viable. Thus booms bring all those boutiques selling just one type of good: socks or scented candles or freshly squeezed juices. But like flowers that display the behavior known as nyctinasty — opening to the sun’s light and warmth — they close as soon as the skies darken and things start to cool.

(4) how easy, or otherwise, it is to get restaurant reservations or tickets for shows.
(5) how many “help wanted” signs appear in the windows of stores and restaurants.

....G.D.P. almost certainly fails to capture newer areas of economic activity, such as today’s digital innovation — so other sources of information are needed to fill the gap....economic policy makers usually scrutinize tens, or even hundreds, of indicators, covering different industries and assets, different parts of the country, different groups of people. They monitor jobs reports, advertising rates, wage settlements, the cost of shipping freight, asset prices, sales of consumer durables and much, much more.
economics  economists  forecasting  non-obvious  GDP  indicators  trends  retailers  boutiques  detail_oriented  economic_data  information_sources  policymakers  policymaking 
november 2015 by jerryking
Small Food Brands, Big Successes - The New York Times
AUG. 24, 2015 | NYT | By STEPHANIE STROM.

New companies are flourishing, encroaching on market share and gaining national distribution as shoppers reach for products that tout themselves as novel, local, rarefied or containing better ingredients.

Total sales are still dominated by big brands, but the investment bank Jefferies reports that the brands lost market share in 42 of 54 categories, from baby food to yogurt, over the last five years as new products gained. Think of Chobani yogurt, which went from no sales to more than $1 billion in revenue in less than five years.
food  brands  start_ups  small_business  niches  boutiques  condiments  entrepreneurship  Chobani  emotional_connections 
august 2015 by jerryking
Meet the Zaouis
23 May 2015 | Financial Times | Jonathan Guthrie.

The business plan for their M&A advisory firm was essentially a Post-it note reading 'Allons-y!" But in the two years since they set it up, broth...
finance  financiers  investment_banking  London  United_Kingdom  start_ups  boutiques  mergers_&_acquisitions 
july 2015 by jerryking
Leading Bay Street banker opens new boutique dealer - The Globe and Mail
TIM KILADZE
Leading Bay Street banker opens new boutique dealer
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Apr. 06 2015
boutiques  Bay_Street  investment_banking  Infor  GMP 
april 2015 by jerryking
Boutique Investment Banks Gain Prestige - NYTimes.com
By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED DECEMBER 9, 2014

FINANCIAL SERVICES, INVESTMENT BANKING, MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS, THE DEAL CYCLE, ALTMAN, ROGER C, BANKING AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS, CENTERVIEW PARTNERS, EFFRON, BLAIR W, EVERCORE PARTNERS INC, LAZARD LLC, MERGERS, ACQUISITIONS AND DIVESTITURES, MOELIS & CO, QATALYST PARTNERS,
investment_banking  Wall_Street  prestige  size  financial_services  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  Centreview  Qatalyst  boutiques  Lazard 
december 2014 by jerryking
Rexall reinvents itself in a bid to boost profitability - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jun. 04 2014

Rexall’s transformation entails everything from replacing its deep blue and orange signature colours with “pool-side” aqua to launching new profit-friendly private label lines such as Be Better and adding more food. A key weapon of choice is offering flu shots and health consultations....Even so, Rexall may need to team up with another player, such as grocer Sobeys or discounter Wal-Mart Canada Corp. or Quebec-based pharmacy specialist Jean Coutu, Mr. Torella suggested. Rexall runs pharmacies in Ontario and Western Canada but none in Quebec nor Eastern Canada, where Sobeys operates drugstores..... Joe Jackman and his Jackman Reinvention Inc. firm, which helped revive Duane Reade and other retailers, is now advising Rexall in its change process.
pharmaceutical_industry  Loblaws  Marina_Strauss  retailers  reinvention  pharmacies  boutiques 
july 2014 by jerryking
Run on the firm may signal Heenan’s demise
BRIAN MILNER
Run on the firm may signal Heenan’s demise Add to ...
Subscribers Only

The Globe and Mail

It’s a fate that awaits other mid-level law firms whose business model is no longer working in a rapidly changing environment. Firms like Heenan Blaikie are being squeezed mercilessly both from above and below – by the heavyweights chasing after business they once ignored as unworthy of their lofty status, and by more nimble specialist firms with lower expenses (including less lavish offices) and cheaper fees.

Like accounting firms and investment banks, law firms are also facing the long-predicted downdrafts emanating from the hollowing out of corporate Canada. As Canadian subsidiaries have ceded greater control to their foreign owners, a chunk of their financial and legal business in Canada has migrated to head offices in other countries.

Published Tuesday, Feb. 04 2014
law_firms  Bay_Street  dissolutions  Heenan_Blaikie  winner-take-all  head_offices  hollowing_out  boutiques  specialists  mid-sized  rapid_change  barbell_effect  Corporate_Canada  mercilessness 
february 2014 by jerryking
Michael Tory: From Lehman’s ashes, a banker is reborn
Dec. 15 2012 | The Globe and Mail | ERIC REGULY.

Mr. Tory had launched a firm called Quattro Partners, since recast as Ondra Partners, which he tailored to the harsh new reality of the post-Lehman world. It would be a pure advisory firm, making it rare, perhaps unique, in London’s cluttered investment banking industry, where the transaction – and the typically fat fee that goes with it – utterly dominates the business model. In the deliciously brutal argot of the street, this is known as “eat what you kill.”

Ondra would make advice its only activity; the firm’s livelihood would not depend on transactions such as debt underwritings or success fees on mergers and acquisitions. It would only take on clients who would pay retainers to cover Ondra’s running costs, with any discretionary transaction-related fees adding to profit.

None of the partners would get stinking rich, but, equally, they would not have to act as shills, eternally pushing services or products because they paid jackpot returns, not necessarily because they were in the best interests of the client. ...Ondra is becoming a player in the City, as London’s financial district is known. Its name is popping up regularly in the financial press and its clients are getting bigger. They include GDF Suez, Prudential, Société Générale and National Grid.
Eric_Reguly  London  United_Kingdom  investment_banking  Ondra  start_ups  eat_what_you_kill  boutiques  John_Tory 
december 2012 by jerryking
Industry: Nimble, niche and networked - FT.com
June 12, 2012 | FT |By Peter Marsh

Nimble companies, operating on a global basis in niche areas of technology, that seem likely to prosper in the new industrial revolution now beginning. The fact that the UK is replete with such businesses suggests the country could emerge once again as a leading contender in manufacturing– a sector it pioneered in the 18th and 19th centuries but more recently has allowed to slip back in favour of services.......Although Britain may have the knowhow and cultural characteristics required to stage an industrial comeback, it still lags behind far behind the likes of Japan and Germany, where boutique companies making uniquely specialised products form the economic backbone of the nation. If Britain is to resurrect manufacturing as a high-value growth engine, it will almost certainly require some action by government to make the most of the country’s potential....hundreds of connections with companies around the world, which is one fundamental characteristic of the new industrial revolution. Three others involve the application of new technologies, a focus on “niche” areas of industry and an increasing focus on “personalised” products........Today the archetypal UK manufacturer is a small business with perhaps 50 employees that is based in an unremarkable edge-of-town business park and boasts global links as opposed to a highly visible smokestack in a large city. Such companies account for a greater share of industrial activity since the larger enterprises have fallen away.....The UK’s prevailing approach to manufacturing – emphasising small, agile businesses with an eye for the unusual that formulate their own rules – could fit in with the requirements for success......An individualist in the same mould is Sir James Dyson, a high-octane innovator who has made his eponymous vacuum cleaner business into a global leader. His dividing of the company’s Asia-based production from its UK-centred product development is in line with the blueprint of the new industrial revolution stressing the separation of elements in the manufacturing “value chain”......There are further reasons to think the natural leanings of UK manufacturing fit into the framework of the new industrial revolution. One is a tendency to focus on selling into areas with narrow parameters that can to a large degree be invented by the participating companies themselves, and to rely on selling services as well as products......The best example is the Formula 1 car racing business. This involves intensive use of engineering resources to design and make high-grade machines that do little apart from playing the lead role in a global spectator sport built on advertising. There is no reason why Britain should have become the leading country for Formula 1 car production – apart from the fact that it fits with the UK leaning towards production based around esoteric technologies and markets......The best example is the Formula 1 car racing business. This involves intensive use of engineering resources to design and make high-grade machines that do little apart from playing the lead role in a global spectator sport built on advertising. There is no reason why Britain should have become the leading country for Formula 1 car production – apart from the fact that it fits with the UK leaning towards production based around esoteric technologies and markets......British industry also features a facility for working with a range of technical disciplines and finding the common ground between them. ......A third important strength of the UK is the ability to devise solutions to customers’ problems. These are often based on an approach geared to making products as highly customised “one-offs”, and to the needs of one business as opposed to many....The characteristics of the new industrial revolution, however, make the task of assisting UK manufacturing a lot simpler as the country already has many of the attributes required. In this new environment it would seem sensible for policy to plug the gaps in the manufacturing framework that already exists. Such initiatives could focus on helping companies to improve their technologies, develop more global strategies and organise more joint development projects with larger businesses in order to learn more about such groups’ technical capabilities.
3-D  boutiques  Dyson  Formula_One  industrial_policies  Industrial_Revolution  manufacturers  niches  nimbleness  one-of-a-kind  personalization  specialists  United_Kingdom 
june 2012 by jerryking
Workouts, Times 2 (or 3)
By COURTNEY RUBIN
Published: May 4, 2012

These women (and nearly all of them are women) who sweat through double and occasionally triple workouts at different boutique fitness outfits in the same day aren’t major-league athletes or required to look good for a living. Most are professionals with full-time jobs, yet they manage to spend some two hours a day — and upward of $500 a month — exercising. (By comparison, a membership at the upscale Equinox gym chain ranges from $149 to $183 a month.)....multiple-gym membership is also popular in “affluent metro areas” like San Francisco and Boston, but the phenomenon of two or more separate, specialized gyms in one day “is definitely a Type-A New Yorker thing.”

How is this different from, say, hitting an elliptical machine and following it up with weights?

For one, the boutique gym workouts may be tougher. “These gyms are expensive, but they’re a cheaper way of having a personal trainer all the time,”.....“They’re small groups and they push you hard.”.....Much-higher-than-expected demand for the all-studio, all-access option forced the company to raise the price from $760 a month to $1,000 within three months of opening, she said, though FITiST does not encourage doubles or “necessarily think they’re healthy.”...
fitness  gyms  exercise  New_York_City  Manhattan  boutiques  upscale 
may 2012 by jerryking
If you can't beat 'em, join a family office
jchevreau@nationalpost.com

Only 7,000 Canadians have investable assets of even $20-million, says Graham Parsons, executive vice-president of BMO Financial Group. But 444,000 have between $1-million and $20-million, and may well want to share the services of a multi-family office. A handful of boutique Canadian firms are branching out from serving a single core family to embrace the MFO model, which means multiple unrelated families can, in effect, share a chief financial officer, legal, trust, tax and insurance professionals.
Canada  Canadian  family_office  Northwood  high_net_worth  boutiques 
october 2011 by jerryking
Caveat Quattrone
14 Sep 2011 | Reuters Breakingviews | By Robert Cyran. When
Frank Quattrone comes calling, buyers should beware. The latest coup for
the former CSFB ace is persuading Google to bid against itself for
Motorola Mobility. Since launching Qatalyst Partners, his premium
investment bank, Quattrone has extracted a much higher premium for
clients than rival tech bankers. Silicon Valley has now been given fair
warning.
Silicon_Valley  investment_banking  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  Frank_Quattrone  Qatalyst_Partners  boutiques 
september 2011 by jerryking
How Lazard, Evercore and Other Boutiques Are Battling the Bulge - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 3, 2011 Boutiques Battle the 'Bulge'By LIZ MOYER And BRETT PHILBIN
investment_banking  boutiques  Lazard 
february 2011 by jerryking
Asher Edelman, the Art World's Gordon Gekko - WSJ.com
JANUARY 29, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By KELLY CROW. A
former corporate raider is shaking up the market with brash tactics and
big plans as an art financier. After navigating the art world for
decades as a collector, museum director and gallery owner, Mr. Edelman
recently set up his own firm, Art Assured Ltd., to arrange art
investments.

The field of art backing is a financial Wild West these days. When the
recession upended the art market a year ago, a number of traditional
institutions like banks and auction houses pulled back from loans and
other financing deals based on the expected selling prices of fine art.
An aggressive set of boutique lenders and financiers have stepped in to
fill the gap. The most prominent art lenders operate as blue-chip
pawnshops, doling out quick cash to collectors, dealers and artists in
exchange for the right to sell the borrowers' artworks if their loans
aren't repaid.
art  art_finance  art_galleries  investing  fine_arts  high_net_worth  collectors  financiers  boutiques  auctions  banks  pawnbrokers  blue-chips  art_market 
january 2010 by jerryking
Financial Adviser: A New Landscape Of Wealth Managers - Financial Adviser - WSJ
September 28, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by Kevin Noblet.
"Some of the biggest winners were smaller old-line private banking
outfits, which benefited as last fall’s financial crisis rocked some of
the giants to their core. Bessemer Trust, formed more than 100 years ago
to manage the money of the Phipps family, partners of Andrew Carnegie,
shot up to No. 13 in the ranking from No. 20 last year. Northern Trust,
long a favorite home for Midwest fortunes, climbed from No. 13 to No. 8.
Fiduciary Trust, started during the Great Depression to serve the
anxious rich, leaped to No. 29 from 37."
wealth_management  high_net_worth  financial_advisors  Bessemer_Trust  boutiques  competitive_landscape  decreasing_returns_to_scale  economic_downturn  event-driven  emotional_connections 
september 2009 by jerryking

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