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jerryking : brain_drain   20

Former Google CFO Patrick Pichette sets his sights on keeping Canadian tech talent at home - The Globe and Mail
TAMSIN MCMAHON U.S. CORRESPONDENT
PALO ALTO, CALIF.
PUBLISHED MAY 13, 2018

As the chief financial officer of Google, Montreal native Patrick Pichette would often make the trip home from Silicon Valley with the message that Canadian companies were too slow in fully embracing the digital economy. These days, he’s offering a different message for Canadian startups: Stay home.

Nearly three years ago, Mr. Pichette quit his US$20-million-a-year job as a senior executive at one of the world’s most powerful internet companies with plans to explore the world.

Now, after almost two years of steady travel, Mr. Pichette, 55, is focusing on the next chapter of his post-Google career. For that, he has set his sights on Canada, where he hopes to invest in building the next generation of entrepreneurial talent.

Earlier this year, he joined Canadian venture firm iNovia as a general partner, attracted by both its strategy to fund Canadian startups in order to keep them at home, but also by the firm’s global ambitions. Mr. Pichette is in the process of moving to Britain for the next several years, where he will establish a London office for iNovia and help steer the firm’s European expansion.

Persistent fears over a brain drain to the United States flared up again this month when researchers at the University of Toronto and Brock University in St. Catharines, Ont., published a study showing that as many as two-thirds of software-engineering graduates from the top Canadian schools were heading abroad to work, often to established firms in Silicon Valley, where they can earn significantly higher salaries.

Mr. Pichette argues that Canada has other advantages for its homegrown tech talent: an expanding tech ecosystem to support entrepreneurs, a more affordable work force for growing startups to tap into and a drastically lower cost of living than the San Francisco Bay Area.
Patrick_Pichette  Google  alumni  iNovia  venture_capital  vc  talent  heritage_migration  software_developers  brain_drain  Silicon_Valley  CFOs  crossborder 
may 2018 by jerryking
Why some killer diseases are overlooked
Simon Kuper FEBRUARY 1, 2018

A poor-children’s disease — diarrhoea, which kills the most kids after pneumonia, is another example — won’t produce many well-off, articulate advocates. Moreover, there’s no simple magic bullet for pneumonia. The disease has many causes and two main forms: viral and bacterial. Health workers often misdiagnose it, sometimes because they haven’t been trained in pneumonia. And many health workers will continue to emigrate from poor to rich countries, says Tom Kenyon, who heads Project HOPE, a health NGO.

Still, difficult as pneumonia is, it’s fixable. Its death toll has fallen, albeit slowly.
attention_economy  brain_drain  disease  malaria  overlooked  pneumonia  Simon_Kuper  vaccines 
february 2018 by jerryking
Why I’m Moving Home
MARCH 16, 2017 | The New York Times | By J. D. VANCE.

" The economist Matthew Kahn has shown that in Appalachia, for instance, the highly skilled are much likelier to leave not just their hometowns but also the region as a whole. This is the classic “brain drain” problem: Those who are able to leave very often do.

The brain drain also encourages a uniquely modern form of cultural detachment. Eventually, the young people who’ve moved out marry — typically to partners with similar economic prospects. They raise children in increasingly segregated neighborhoods, giving rise to something the conservative scholar Charles Murray calls “super ZIPs.” These super ZIPs are veritable bastions of opportunity and optimism, places where divorce and joblessness are rare." ......“The sociological role [colleges and universities] play is to suck talent out of small towns and redistribute it to big cities.” There have always been regional and class inequalities in our society, but the data tells us that we’re living through a unique period of segregation....This has consequences beyond the purely material. Jesse Sussell and James A. Thomson of the RAND Corporation argue that this geographic sorting has heightened the polarization that now animates politics. This polarization reflects itself not just in our voting patterns, but also in our political culture...JD Vance has decided to move [back] home-to Ohio....."we often frame civic responsibility in terms of government taxes and transfer payments, so that our society’s least fortunate families are able to provide basic necessities. But this focus can miss something important: that what many communities need most is not just financial support, but talent and energy and committed citizens to build viable businesses and other civic institutions."
sorting  segregation  neighbourhoods  polarization  geographic_mobility  brain_drain  super_ZIPs  cultural_detachment  Rust_Belt  midwest  Red_states  whites  political_partisanship  political_polarization  working_class  J.D._Vance  highly_skilled  industrial_Midwest  Appalachia  cities  engaged_citizenry  talent  Charles_Murray  civics  social_mobility  self-perpetuation  values  opportunity_gaps  college-educated  geographic_sorting  regional  compartmentalization 
march 2017 by jerryking
Paradise lost - FT.com
December 19, 2013 5:03 pm
Paradise lost

By Robin Wiggleswort

The Caribbean is suffering from crippling government debt, endemic crime and a middle-class brain drain that have contributed to an economic meltdown of alarming proportions...

Persaud blames an “anti-growth coalition” for the Caribbean’s plight, a tight-knit nexus of politicians, business interests and unions that benefit from the status quo – one of the invisible flaws of small states where everyone knows one another. “The Caribbean is at a crossroads, it desperately needs political leadership,” he argues. “It can overcome these challenges, as other small states have, but it requires courage.”

Some fear that the erosion of the local middle classes – both the backbone of civil society as well as the most demanding voters – eases the pressure on politicians to shape up. “The depletion of our brightest graduates, our middle class and some of our most enterprising workers has drained the foundations of our society,” laments Trevor Munroe, a Jamaican academic, former union leader and founder of National Integrity Action, an anti-corruption watchdog. “Remittances are a big plus, but the big minus is the weakening of society’s internal drivers for reform.”
Caribbean  criminality  brain_drain  emigration  small_states  anti-growth  anti-development  tourism  cultural_detachment  middle_class  leadership  courage  civil_society  crony_capitalism  business_interests  cronyism  demanding_voters  debt 
december 2013 by jerryking
There needs to be a sober examination of our state of affairs Georgetown, Guyana
December 6, 2013 | Stabroek News | Frank Fyffe.

Said Fenty: “I now lament the stark fact that politics, governance, discrimination, corruption, management of resources and lack of employment among other factors, have caused young Guyanese to yearn to leave this homeland still rich with resources. Do you realise what national hopelessness means amongst the larger portion of our population?” But who can honestly look you in the eye and deny that? And I’m not denying the hard, perilous and precarious times many are faced with abroad, but the very fact that they crave madly the opportunity to leave paints a picture and tells a different story ‒ too many things are amiss and adrift.
Guyana  letters_to_the_editor  failed_states  misgovernance  hopelessness  brain_drain  emigration  politics  governance  discrimination  corruption  mismanagement  unemployment  precarious 
december 2013 by jerryking
Caribbean in greatest crisis since independence : Kaieteur News
November 18, 2012 | By KNews | Sir Ronald Sanders.

This is a worrying condition for the CARICOM region. For, if the public has lost faith in the willingness of governments and institutions to act swiftly and together to extract them from crisis, the consequences will be even more serious. They will include increased emigration of the skilled persons in our societies, shrinkage of investment by local business people, and a general malaise in the productive sector. In short, it will lead to a worsening of the crisis.
The sad aspect of all this is that every leader in the member-states of CARICOM, in its institutions and in the private sector know very well that deeper integration of Caribbean economies and closer harmonisation of their external relations would be an immediate stimulus to pulling CARICOM countries out of what Dr Anthony rightly describes as “this vicious vortex of persistent low growth, crippling debt, huge fiscal deficits and high unemployment”.
Caribbean  crisis  Caricom  failed_states  misgovernance  low_growth  brain_drain  unemployment  debt  sovereignty  downward_spirals 
november 2012 by jerryking
Zimbabwe's New Export - WSJ.com
August 3, 2004 | WSJ | Editorials

The fate of the evicted white farmers has been less publicized. While many left the continent, others have been welcomed by neighboring African countries eager to profit from their agricultural knowledge and expertise. Zimbabwe's loss has been their gain.

Zambia led the move, and the country has moved from food shortages in the 1990s to actually exporting food -- ironically much of it to Zimbabwe. Tens of thousands of jobs have been created and related industries are growing. Noting Zambia's success, other African countries are following suit. Last week Nigeria's western state of Kwara enticed a group of former Zimbabwean farmers to set up shop with promises of tax breaks and loans.

Mugabe unleashed mob rule on Zimbabwe a decade ago, purporting to right colonial wrongs by "reclaiming" (mostly) white-owned farms for family and friends. It's no small irony that some of those who were dispossessed are now rebuilding their lives and work elsewhere, while those Mugabe claimed to be helping are hungrier and worse off than before.

The welcoming of Zimbabwe's white farmers into other African countries, and the benefits they bring in terms of agricultural know-how, is another reminder of Mugabe's personal culpability in ruining Zimbabwe. It also makes the silence of African leaders as Zimbabwe descends further into chaos all the more inexcusable.
dislocations  Zimbabwe  Robert_Mugabe  editorials  farming  agriculture  brain_drain  evictions  farmland  dispossessions  whites  industry_expertise  expulsions 
august 2012 by jerryking
More U.S. Children of Immigrants Are Leaving U.S. - NYTimes.com
By KIRK SEMPLE
Published: April 15, 2012

Some scholars and business leaders contend that this emigration does not necessarily bode ill for the United States. They say young entrepreneurs and highly educated professionals sow American knowledge and skills abroad. At the same time, these workers acquire experience overseas and build networks that they can carry back to the United States or elsewhere — a pattern known as “brain circulation.”

But the experts caution that in the global race for talent, the return of these expatriates to the United States and American companies is no longer a sure bet.
emigration  brain_drain  brain_circulation  expatriates  heritage_migration 
april 2012 by jerryking
Human capital flight  - Stabroek News - Guyana
Human capital flight
By Stabroek staff | 8 Comments | Editorial | Saturday, March 3, 2012

"Five years ago a World Bank study found that seven of the ten countries with the highest emigration rates for college students were in the Caribbean. Guyana held the unenviable top spot with a jaw-dropping 89 per cent. Those rates and the flight of human capital they indicate, the so-called ‘brain-drain,’ have undoubtedly worsened since, even though immigration to Europe, North America and elsewhere has become far more difficult. Two years ago another World Bank report found that nearly three-quarters of the nurses trained in the anglophone Caribbean end up working in the Britain, Canada or the United States."
brain_drain  emigration  guyana  human_capital  Caribbean  World_Bank 
march 2012 by jerryking
Yahoo Battles Brain Drain - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 5, 2011 | WSJ | By AMIR EFRATI.
Yahoo Battles Brain Drain
Internet Company Braces for Wave of Exits After Holidays
brain_drain  Yahoo! 
december 2011 by jerryking
Imperatives for Change: Canada in 2010
Tue, May 21, 2002 | Canadian Club | by Anne Golden
President and CEO, The Conference Board of Canada
Royal York Hotel Imperial Room
Canada  CEOs  speeches  threats  challenges  cities  innovation  agendas  crossborder  productivity  North_America  change  future  brain_drain 
october 2011 by jerryking
Worrying migration trends : Kaieteur News
August 5, 2010 | By KNews | Filed Under Editorial
migrants  Guyana  brain_drain 
august 2010 by jerryking
Ben Wildavsky: Don't Fear the Globalization of Higher Education, and Embrace Free Trade in Minds - WSJ.com
MAY 14, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by BEN WILDAVSKY. No
Barriers to Free Trade in Minds. Competition is as healthy on campuses
as it is everywhere else. We should not fear the globalization of higher
education—we should embrace it.

for all its promise, academic globalization—like its equivalents in the
worlds of finance and industry—has proven controversial.

There are long-standing worries in the developing world about a brain
drain, and the converse concern in the West that talented foreigners
will crowd out domestic students. Above all, there is a broader fear in
the West that as universities elsewhere become stronger and more
competitive, we will lose our edge...Trying to keep more of their top
students and researchers at home, China and Singapore, among others,
also are courting Western-trained faculty and pouring money into
improving their universities, keenly aware that higher education is the
pathway to innovation and economic growth.
Colleges_&_Universities  globalization  education  brain_drain  free-trade  heritage_migration 
may 2010 by jerryking
China Drawing High-Tech Research From U.S. - NYTimes.com
March 17, 2010 | New York Times | By KEITH BRADSHER. Companies —
and their engineers — are being drawn here more and more as China
develops a high-tech economy that increasingly competes directly with
the United States...For years, many of China’s best and brightest left
for the United States, where high-tech industry was more cutting-edge.
But Mark R. Pinto is moving in the opposite direction.Mr. Pinto is the
first CTO of a major American tech company to move to China.
China  green  reverse_innovation  research  Applied_Materials  heritage_migration  Xi’an  cleantech  emigration  brain_drain  the_best_and_brightest 
march 2010 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: The return of the brain drain
March 12, 2009 G&M letter to the editor by BRUCE HUNTER in response to "The return of the brain drain"

March 12, 2009
letters_to_the_editor  crossborder  brain_drain 
march 2009 by jerryking

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