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jerryking : brand_identity   7

James Quincey, Coca-Cola CEO, on why brands have to take a stand
MAY 21, 2017 | FT | Lindsay Whipp in Atlanta.

Coca-Cola will be going back to its roots, developing and marketing drinks, not distributing them. But even without the bottling operations, the 51-year-old has a complex assignment on his hands.....While its fizzy drinks still account for nearly three-quarters of its sales by volume, according to Beverage Digest, its shares have underperformed those of rivals PepsiCo, which has a snacks division, and Dr Pepper Snapple over the past five years.

Mr Quincey is only too aware of the need for diversification and plans to accelerate investments in start-ups with promise. “The company must be capable of being bigger than the brand,” he says.

That distinction is important. The significant shift in consumer preferences is evident in the brand value of Coca-Cola (as opposed to Coca-Cola the company), which has tumbled from the top position globally, as ranked by BrandFinance, to 27th over the past decade. That represents a decline of more than $10bn to $31.8bn this year.

But what does this difference between company and product mean for the brand? “It’s very difficult to have the name on the door of the company and brand, and not have some overlap in what they stand for,” Mr Quincey says. “You’d have to change the name of the company. It’s not what we’re doing, just to be clear.”....Mr Quincey believes brands have to take a stand in this volatile environment — even at the risk of alienating some consumers. Coca-Cola did this earlier this year, by denouncing publicly Mr Trump’s controversial executive order banning citizens of certain majority Muslim countries from travelling to the US.

“A brand has to stand for something and you have to make the choices of what you want it to stand for, and then stand behind those choices,”
beverages  brands  brand_identity  brand_purpose  CEOs  Coca-Cola  Pepsi  shifting_tastes 
january 2018 by jerryking
How Peloton is Marketing a $2,000 Bike Beyond the Rich - WSJ
By Alexandra Bruell
Oct. 25, 2017

When Carolyn Tisch Blodgett joined fitness startup Peloton as its brand marketing lead a year-and-a-half ago, the company’s executives were focused on promoting the functionality of their product -- a $1,995 stationary bike with an attached tablet and a $39-a-month subscription service for access to live and on-demand classes.

What they were missing, however, was a compelling brand story about the bike’s convenience and its role in connecting riders around the country, largely through a leaderboard that displays rider data, said Ms. Blodgett.

“My challenge over the last year-and-a-half has been telling this brand story,” she said. “We wanted to bring the product to life but also the brand.”

Ms. Blodgett also conducted research showing that the company had been targeting a core, affluent audience, but overlooking a less affluent consumer who was willing to splurge on a convenient fitness habit.

Peloton is now shifting gears with a new financing program ($97 per month for 39 months for both the bike and subscription service), an ad campaign that’s more relatable to a diverse consumer base and an NBC Olympics sponsorship.
Peloton  fitness  storytelling  brand_identity  brands  data_driven  connected_devices  subscriptions  overlooked  overlooked_opportunities  functionality 
october 2017 by jerryking
P.R. Agency Begins a Push to Modernize - NYTimes.com
October 13, 2013 | NYT | By STUART ELLIOTT.

The initiative includes, in addition to the new slogan, beginning a series of meetings of thought leaders, under the rubric of the Burson-Marsteller Conversations; revamping the employee training program; forming a worldwide strategic leadership team; hiring additional senior managers; introducing a “reverse mentoring” program in which younger employees mentor their elders in digital and social media; retooling the Burson-Marsteller Web site; and redesigning brand identity materials like business cards. ...Burson-Marsteller joins a long list of public relations agencies reconsidering how they operate amid new forces like social media and real-time marketing. Others include DeVries Public Relations, which was renamed DeVries Global; FleishmanHillard, part of the Omnicom Group; and the Olson P.R. division of Olson, re-branded as Olson Engage.
public_relations  reinvention  Burson-Marsteller  WPP  Young_&_Rubicam  retooling  modernization  brand_identity  training_programs 
october 2013 by jerryking
The Future of Manufacturing is Local - NYTimes.com
March 27, 2011 | | By ALLISON ARIEFF. Mark Dwight, CEO of
Rickshaw Bagworks, initially started SFMade with the intention of
creating a brand identity for the products produced within San Francisco
city limits, something he calls “geographic ingredient branding.” More
easily understood as something akin to terroir, geographic ingredient
branding emphasizes “pride of place,” which runs deep in cities like San
Francisco and New York. “I saw this as a way to ‘brand’ the history,
culture, personality and natural beauty of our city as a means to
uniquely differentiate our local manufacturers,” says Dwight. “I coined
the term ‘geographic ingredient branding’ as an emulation of successful
technology ingredient branding campaigns such as ‘Intel Inside.’”
manufacturers  local  future  economy  hyperlocal  San_Francisco  branding  cities  geography  pride  geographic_ingredient_branding  brand_identity 
march 2011 by jerryking
Evangelist in sheep's clothing
Jun 2, 2010 | FT | by Anna Fifield.

Ideas for JCK

Do
* Hold onto your brand's core msg. "Having a strong identity from the
beginning helps shape the org. as it evolves."
* Use retail to create a deeper customer connection "There's nothing
like being able to tell your full story in 3 dimensions."
* Hire a specialist team of retail advisers when opening in new mkts
"We've been successful over the yrs. because when we do something new,
we find people who can teach us."
* Connect with the local community to create local advocates "It's all
about repeat business & people talking to people."

Don't
* See wholesale and retail as substitutes - they should be complementary
"If we take the eye off our wholesale business then our cash cow dries
up & we can no longer fund our retail expansion."
* Be afraid to be anti-fashion "We're about longevity, not [about being]
disposable."
* Forget that great brands grow through word of mouth "Our most
important question is: 'Would U recommend Icebreaker to others?'"
brand_identity  ProQuest  New_Zealand  entrepreneur  clothing  international_marketing  lifestyles  branding  outdoors  apparel  storytelling  Communicating_&_Connecting  WoM  longevity  3-D  customer_intimacy  think_threes  retailers  wholesalers  cash_cows  disposability  brands 
june 2010 by jerryking
The Burberry business model: creating an international luxury fashion brand
2004. | International Journal of Retail & Distribution
Management Vol. 32, Iss. 8/9; pg. 412 | Christopher M Moore, Grete
Birtwistle. The Burberry model identifies 5 ksfs:

(1) The importance of a clearly defined brand positioning which
communicates a definite set of attractive brand values and lifestyle
associations.

(2) The requirement to maintain a co-ordinated distribution strategy
whereby retail chains compliment and are complimented by wholesale
chains which assure maximum market coverage.

(3) The opportunities afforded by a strong brand identity to extend into
adjacent product areas either through internal capability or via
licensing agreements.

(4) The opportunities afforded by a flexible approach to the management
of important foreign markets - such as in the form of delegating
marketing activity through licensing agreements.

(5) The importance of media relations management to the creation and
maintenance of a credible luxury fashion brand reputation.
adjacencies  Burberry  luxury  branding  fashion  brand_identity 
december 2009 by jerryking
reportonbusiness.com: Set yourself apart from the pack
February 18, 2009, Special to The Globe and Mail, CHARLES
MANDEL. The article profiles Toronto-based entrepreneur Andy Wilkin, who
opens a coffee roasting company that will supply beans to restaurants
and cafes. The goal: bringing premium coffee to his customers. Mr.
Wilkin's strategic differences originate in large part from Tedde van
Gelderen, the president of Toronto-based Akendi, which helps launch
businesses and fine-tunes their products and services.

Akendi assisted Mr. Wilkin with his brand identity, logo, signage and
website, and also helped the coffee roaster understand what he would
need to do to differentiate his business.
entrepreneurship  entrepreneur  coffee  high-end  Akendi  start_ups  product_launches  branding  differentiation  brand_identity 
february 2009 by jerryking

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