recentpopularlog in

jerryking : budgeting   2

Subways for riders, not voters - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Oct. 29 2013,

To govern is to choose, and to choose poorly is to govern badly. A public dollar spent in one place means a dollar less to spend anywhere else. Money squandered over here spells belt-tightening over there. Welcome, friends, to the saga of Toronto public transit....Some of the transit problems have to do with a simple lack of public spending on transit. But a lot of what’s ailing the GTA is about what’s been done within the budget envelope. There have been so many completely wrongheaded spending decisions. And they’ve been motivated by transit politics, not transit economics....

In the 1970s, a subway was driven up the centre of the low-density Allen Expressway. A few years later, provincial industrial policy foisted an overpriced, rickety, made-in-Ontario technology onto the Scarborough Rapid Transit line. The nineties brought the Sheppard subway; transit in the centre of Toronto groans from an excess of demand, in part because so many precious public dollars were sunk into a subway whose ridership is lower than the busiest downtown streetcar route. Governments – municipal, provincial and even federal – time and again pushed for big-ticket projects that impress a desired group of voters far more than they serve real transit users.
editorials  Toronto  politics  transit  policy  misrule  mismanagement  decision_making  Octothorpe_Software  public_transit  public_spending  budgets  budgeting  choices  transit_politics  transit_economics 
october 2013 by jerryking
What to Do Before Disaster Strikes - WSJ.com
September 27, 2005 | WSJ | By GEORGE ANDERS.

What's missing is a systematic way of approaching corporate self-defense. Each potential calamity is treated in isolation....Sheffi believes that companies need to start by cataloging what could go wrong. General Motors Corp., for example, has created "vulnerability maps" that identify more than 100 hazards, ranging from wind damage to embezzlement. Such maps make it easier for managers to focus on areas of greatest risk or gravest peril. He implies that normal budgeting -- which matches the cost of doing something against the risk-adjusted cost of doing nothing -- can determine which battles against vulnerability are worth fighting....Mr. Sheffi nods approvingly at some ingenious ways to mobilize for trouble before it arrives. Federal Express Corp., he says, puts two empty planes in the air each night, just so they can swoop into any airport with a grounded plane and take over delivery services as fast as possible. Wall Street firms have recently added similar redundancy with multiple data centers, so that a New York City crisis won't imperil their record-keeping.

Intel Corp. (post-Heathrow) gets a thumbs-up, too, for finding a sly way of outwitting airport thieves. It couldn't control every aspect of security in transit -- but it could change its box design. Rather than boast about "Intel inside," the company switched to drab, unmarked packaging that gave no hint of $6 million cargoes. The name for this approach: "Security through obscurity." (jk: security consciousness)
disaster_preparedness  risk-management  book_reviews  mapping  security_&_intelligence  redundancies  vulnerabilities  rate-limiting_steps  business-continuity  thinking_tragically  obscurity  cost_of_inaction  base_rates  isolated  GM  Fedex  Intel  risk-adjusted  self-defense  Wall_Street  high-risk  budgeting  disasters  beforemath  risks  George_Anders  catastrophes  natural_calamities  systematic_approaches  security_consciousness  record-keeping  hazards 
may 2012 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read