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jerryking : business_acumen   10

Thinking in Levels (How to Dig Deeper And Think Better)
Apr 21, 2018 | Medium | by Thomas Oppong.

Einstein once said, “You can’t solve a problem from the level of thinking that created the problem in the first place“.
*
[JCK: what follows is an example of thinking in layers] The process of thinking involves several levels, but only a few people think beyond the first level.....Thinking in levels can expose flaws in your decision making process, helping you to make choices with little or no blindspots....Robert Sternberg, a professor of psychology and education at Yale University, says that successful people use three kinds of intelligence: analytical, creative, and practical. A successful person, according to Sternberg, uses all three.......Instead of thinking on the fly, you use mental models to analyse every situation before making a choice.

The 3 thinking levels:
** Level 1
Level one thinkers observe, but rarely interpret or analyse what they see.
They take information on the face value. ..First-level thinking is simplistic and superficial, and just about everyone can do it (a bad sign for anything involving an attempt at superiority). All the first-level thinker needs is an opinion about the future, as in “The outlook for the company is favorable, meaning the stock will go up.” ...Most people get stuck at level 1. They take in facts, statistics and information, but never question the reasoning behind them or make the effort analyse what they have seen, read or been taught. They obsessively seek out truth that confirms their worldviews and cling to it with little room for metacognition (thinking about their thinking)..

** Level 2
At this level, you allow yourself to interpret, make connections and meanings. Second-level thinking is deep, complex and convoluted....At the second level, decision makers begin to interpret and analyze the pieces they have observed and put them together to form meaning.
This is the level at which we begin to look for alignments, contrast, repetition or improvements....Level two thinkers synthesis better — build up or connect separate pieces of information to form a larger, more coherent pattern. They are better at reorganizing or rearranging ideas to produce a more comprehensive understanding of the “big picture”.

** Level 3
This is the alpha stage of thinking.
Level 3 thinkers have the capacity to transfer knowledge, i.e., to apply a concept learned in one context to different contexts than the one in which the concept was originally learned.....Level 3 thinkers can view an issue or idea from a variety of viewpoints, standpoints, or positions to gain a more comprehensive and holistic understanding. They generate imaginative ideas, unique perspectives, innovative strategies, or novel (alternative) approaches to traditional practices.
Albert_Einstein  blindspots  books  business_acumen  connecting_the_dots  critical_thinking  decision_making  interpretation  metacognition  questions  thinking  thinking_deliberatively  weaknesses 
13 days ago by jerryking
One given moment
Apr 2nd 2016 | The Economist |
Johan Cryuff believed that true beauty of the world’s most beautiful game, didn’t lie in tricksy technique. If a man could juggle a ball a thousand times, it proved only that he ought to join the circus. Of course, it was great when Rudolf Nureyev said he should have been a dancer. But Cryuff was not just using his long, lean body when he played football. He was mostly using his brain....

Strategic nous - "practical intelligence/good judgement/shrewdness" = "high-octane business acumen"

As a coach of Barcelona, Cryuff instigated their junior academy, La Masia, the imitated the one he had set up to at Club Ajax. There a new generation of players—Messi, Iniesta, Xavi and the rest—learned to play in the swift, precise and total Cruyff style.

Soccer clubs that hired Cryuff, as a director or adviser were berated when things were not done as they had to be, his way. “Before I make a mistake, I don’t make that mistake,” he said.

Match analysts almost made him into a scholar of the turf, “a Pythagoras in boots”, as he was called once. For him, it was all just instinct.

Cryuff usually played forward, but his philosophy of “total football”—in which he had been coached himself by Rinus Michels at Ajax, before he became its most celebrated “conductor”, as of an orchestra—allowed any player to take any position on the field. Left-wingers could be right-wingers, and a goalie could even be an attacker, using his feet for a change. (Why not? It was a waste of a position otherwise.) Switching and swapping was a neat way to confound the opposition,

His rules of the game were simple. (Geometrical, some said, even mystical.) If he had the ball, the space on the pitch had to be made as large as possible. If he didn’t have it, the space had to become threatening and small. He adjusted his perspective continually with the movement of the ball. At one given moment—neither too early nor too late, en un momento dado, his catchphrase when he shaped Barcelona into the world’s top team—the ball and he would meet.
business_acumen  coaching  FC_Barcelona  fingerspitzengefühl  Johan_Cryuff  moments  obituaries  soccer  spatial_awareness  strategic_thinking 
september 2016 by jerryking
David Carr, a Journalist at the Center of the Sweet Spot - NYTimes.com
By A. O. SCOTTFEB. 13, 2015

David’s public contribution to the profession — his columns and feature stories, his interviews and investigations — is part of the record, and part of the glory of this newspaper. He covered every corner of the media business (including, sometimes, his own employer) with analytical acumen, ethical rigor and gumshoe tenacity.

He managed to see the complexities of digital-age journalism from every angle, and to write about it with unparalleled clarity and wit.

....“What else?” was the question that would punctuate every conversation with him. What were you working on? What did you think of this or that political event, show-business caper or piece of office gossip? How was your family? What were you thinking? This was sincere, friendly curiosity, the expression of a naturally gregarious temperament. But it was also the operation of a tireless journalistic instinct. David was always hungry for stories. He was a collector of personalities and anecdotes, a shrewd and compassionate judge of character. A warrior for the truth.
David_Carr  journalists  journalism  tributes  business_acumen  obituaries  digital_media  NYT  newspapers  curiosity  questions  memoirists  anecdotal 
february 2015 by jerryking
What is good for a business isn’t necessarily good for the country
Aug. 27 2013 | The Globe and Mail |CHRISTOPHER RAGAN
...Most non-economists probably think economics and business are the same. But anyone who has studied economics knows they are very different. Having done so for about 30 years, I am very comfortable thinking about how markets work, how they often fail to function effectively and how various government policies affect their operation. But I readily admit to having no expertise about product development, marketing campaigns, distribution networks or managing employees.

I only wish more business people admitted to having the opposite ignorance. People successful in their businesses obviously know a lot about running their own companies and dealing with their unique competitive challenges. But many of them believe their business acumen extends to the broader economy. They suffer from the misconception that what is good for their business is good for the country as a whole. And this is where they are terribly wrong.... Adam Smith was crystal clear about business interests, writing in 1776 that “people of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.”...Fortunately for us, [James Moore] understands the difference between business interests and the national interest.
Adam_Smith  business_acumen  business_interests  businessman_fallacy  delusions  economics  humility  misconceptions  marketing  national_interests  policymaking  pro-business  product_development  rent-seeking  self-interest 
november 2013 by jerryking
Help yourself by helping others
?? | Globe & Mail | Lynda Taller-Wakter.

* Define your objectives, then find an organization that can help you achieve them. if fund raising is the skill you want to develop, target a bigger organization with canvassing and other related opportunities.
* Don’t dismiss the importance of volunteer work on a résumé.
* Volunteer, even if you don’t think you have the time.
* Volunteer work can build your esteem - an important stepping stone for getting back to work.
* Test your skills in the marketplace as soon as possible.
* Joining the right organizations can raise your profile at work.
* Network wisely
* Develop acumen in a new field. If career is behind your volunteering, supplement it: there are courses in such areas as fund raising and festivals management.
volunteering  Managing_Your_Career  business_acumen  résumés  expertise  job_search  tips  serving_others  networking  generosity 
december 2012 by jerryking
The cable guy: David Campbell
Mar. 31, 2005 | The Globe and Mail| Doug Steiner.

Most great entrepreneurs I know are successful for one simple reason: They combine their observations of the world with their particular skill set....I asked Campbell years ago how he managed to find these business winners time after time. He said he imagined what he could do with something new, and then considered all the benefits that product or service would bring to customers. By doing so, he took his mundane skills as a radio engineer and parlayed them into a fortune.

The lesson I see in Campbell's experience: Innovators don't really innovate. Rather, they see a future that incorporates their view of the present. That might be a shock to those of you who think you can come up with a great idea and put it into action all by yourself. I believe that innovation and the development of new markets begins with customers....I asked Campbell years ago how he managed to find these business winners time after time. He said he imagined what he could do with something new, and then considered all the benefits that product or service would bring to customers. By doing so, he took his mundane skills as a radio engineer and parlayed them into a fortune.

successful entrepreneurs don't just have a snappy new invention, talent or concept that they want to sell. They don't just see a trend developing and have a vision of the future. They also see things that lots of people might actually need or want. The best of those entrepreneurs have the practical skills to run an organization themselves or to pick the right people to do it for them. And the very, very best of them, like Campbell, repeat the process over and over.

Let's carry Campbell's business acumen forward to today. If I were thinking like him, I'd be imagining how to reduce people's reliance on expensive internet access through regular cable and phone companies. I'd research the industry for new communications technologies--Mesh Radio, WiMax 802.16REVd or broadband wireless phones. Parks Associates, a Dallas-based telecommunications research and consulting firm, thinks that Asia will adopt this potentially ultracheap new technology before the U.S. What form will it take? I'd study various scenarios, form my own view of the future and imagine how a spanking new technology might fit the bill.
Doug_Steiner  entrepreneur  CATV  innovation  creativity  books  far-sightedness  business_acumen  the_right_people 
november 2011 by jerryking
Goldman Sachs Rakes In Profit in Credit Crisis - NYTimes.com
November 19, 2007 | New York Times | By JENNY ANDERSON and
LANDON THOMAS Jr.
At that point, the holdings of Goldman’s mortgage desk were down
somewhat, but the notoriously nervous Mr. Viniar was worried about
bigger problems. After reviewing the full portfolio with other
executives, his message was clear: the bank should reduce its stockpile
of mortgages and mortgage-related securities and buy expensive insurance
as protection against further losses, a person briefed on the meeting
said.
Rarely on Wall Street, where money travels in herds, has one firm gotten
it so right when nearly everyone else was getting it so wrong.
With its mix of swagger and contrary thinking, it was just the kind of
bet that has long defined Goldman’s hard-nosed, go-it-alone style.
Goldman’s secret sauce, say executives, analysts and historians, is
high-octane business acumen, tempered with paranoia and institutionally
encouraged — though not always observed — humility.
====================================

Strategic nous - "practical intelligence/good judgement/shrewdness" = "high-octane business acumen"
business_acumen  contrarians  crisis  economic_downturn  Goldman_Sachs  hard_times  herd_behaviour  herd_instincts  humility  Lloyd_Blankfein  paranoia  profits  proprietary  recessions  special_sauce  stockpiles  Wall_Street 
february 2010 by jerryking
When you're drowning in knowledge, it's experience that counts
Aug. 20, 2009 | Globe & Mail | by Dan Richards. The key
to success today is no longer knowledge and information alone; more than
ever it's the discipline, experience, perspective and insight to know
what to do with that information, something that only comes from the
battle scars earned working through multiple market cycles....The bottom line is simple: If knowledge alone drives success, then years of experience may be less critical than intellect and analytical prowess. But in a time of market uncertainty such as we see today, intellect and knowledge alone aren't enough. Financial advisers and money managers also need the acumen that only years of hard-won experience can bring.
business_acumen  commoditization_of_information  Dan_Richards  discernment  experience  financial_advisors  information_overload  insights  investment_advice  money_management  pattern_recognition  uncertainty  wisdom  self-discipline  judgment  perspectives 
august 2009 by jerryking
Deep thoughts on the art of thinking
09-19-2007 The Globe and Mail book review by Schachter, Harvey of
PRACTICAL INTELLIGENCE By Karl Albrecht, Jossey-Bass, 396 pages, $33.99
book_reviews  business_acumen  critical_thinking  thinking 
march 2009 by jerryking
The cable guy
03-31-2005| RoBM | by Doug Steiner profiles CATV entrepreneur,
David Campbell. References "Do You Really Need an MBA?" Successful
entrepreneurs don't just have a snappy new invention, talent or concept
that they want to sell. They don't just see a trend developing and have a
vision of the future. They also see things that lots of people might
actually need or want. The best of those entrepreneurs have the
practical skills to run an org. themselves or to pick the right people
to do it for them. And the very, very best of them, e.g. Campbell,
repeat the process over & over. Let's carry Campbell's business
acumen forward to today. Think like him. Imagine reducing people's
reliance on expensive internet access thru regular CATV & phone
companies. Research the industry for new communications
technologies--Mesh Radio, WiMax 802.16REVd or broadband wireless phones.
..What form will it take? Study various scenarios, form a view of the
future and envision how a new tech. might fit the bill.
profile  inspiration  entrepreneur  book_reviews  Doug_Steiner  the_right_people  CATV  business_acumen  David_Campbell 
january 2009 by jerryking

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