recentpopularlog in

jerryking : business_history   8

Companies should learn from history to avoid repeating mistakes of the past
September 27, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER.

Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it. -George Santayana
*****************************************************************
BEST BUSINESS HISTORY BOOKS
If you want to improve your knowledge of business history, two good places to start might be Prof. Martin’s books, From Wall Street to Bay Street, the first overview of the Canadian financial system in half a century, co-written with Christopher Kobrak, and Relentless Change, the only case book for the study of Canadian business history. Beyond that, here’s three others he suggests you could benefit from:

* Northern Enterprise: Five Centuries of Business History by Michael Bliss;
* Historical Atlas of Canada, Volumes I to III with different editors;
* Madisson Database Project 2018 by The Groningen Growth and Development Centre, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
*****************************************************************

Joe Martin, a professor of Canadian business history and strategy at Rotman School of Management, is on a mission. He believes Canadians lack sufficient knowledge of history in general and business history in particular. But rather than seize upon Santayana’s famed quote about the value of history, he points to an anonymous businessman who said, “I study history so I can make my own mistakes.”.....We fail in business schools, where virtually no courses are offered (other than at Harvard Business School, which has included history programs since its founding in 1908 and now has about 20 historians affiliated to the school). And we fail in corporations, where new leaders think history begins with their ascension and the few histories produced on the organization tend to be heavily sanitized....Certain themes recur in business history, of course. Recessions are one. Some signs suggest we may be on the cusp of one now, but each time they hit many corporate leaders seem flabbergasted, as if nobody ever experienced this situation before....Then there’s boom-and-bust. In the dot-com heyday of the late 1990s, Prof. Martin notes in an interview, he was chairman of Angoss Software Corp. and watching his net worth go up $250,000 a week. It was glorious until it started going down $250,000 a week. It seemed new, but history is littered with equivalent situations. .....At the core of understanding the history of our economy should be the baseball diamond growth model developed at the Stern School at New York University. At home plate is government because an effective political system enables economic growth. First base is a sound financial system, to allow growth. At second base are enterprising entrepreneurs to build upon that. Third base is for sophisticated managers of large corporations......As for corporate histories, he prefers them done by historians, with full access to the material, including key players. ....“Learn from history so you don’t repeat the mistakes of the past. That’s critical,”
best_of  boom-to-bust  books  business_archives  business_history  Canada  Canadian  dotcom  Harvey_Schachter  history  Joe_Martin  lessons_learned  Michael_Bliss  quotes  recessions  Rotman 
september 2019 by jerryking
What the history of the electric dynamo teaches about the future of the computer.
JUNE 9 2007 6:18 AM
By Tim Harford

David's research also suggests patience. New technology takes time to have a big economic impact. More importantly, businesses and society itself have to adapt before that will happen. Such change is always difficult and, perhaps mercifully, slower than the march of technology.

More recent research from MIT's Erik Brynjolfsson has shown that the history of the dynamo is repeating itself: Companies do not do well if they spend a lot of money on IT projects unless they also radically reorganize to take advantage of the technology. The rewards of success are huge, but the chance of failure is high. That may explain why big IT projects so often fail, and why companies nevertheless keep trying to introduce them.

Brynjolfsson recently commented that the technology currently available is enough to fuel a couple of decades of organizational improvements.
technology  Alfred_Chandler  historians  IT  productivity  productivity_payoffs  Erik_Brynjolfsson  organizational_improvements  organizational_change  organizational_structure  Tim_Harford  business_history 
may 2017 by jerryking
FT.com / Management - The corporate memory-makers
January 11 2010 | Financial Times | By Alicia Clegg. From a
communications perspective, say enthusiasts, the combination of
technology and storytelling creates all kinds of possibilities for
businesses to bring their brands imaginatively to life as well as to
pass knowledge and skills from one generation of employees to the next.
Through the retelling of veterans’ memories, companies hope to build
stronger, more successful, cultures.
archives  business_archives  business_history  commemoration  corporate  heritage  historians  history  organizational_culture  storytelling 
january 2010 by jerryking
Alfred Chandler, Pulitzer winner, leading business historian - The Boston Globe
May 14, 2007 | Boston Globe | By Mark Feeney, Globe Staff.
Alfred D. Chandler's greatest accomplishment was to " establish business
history as an independent and important area for study,"
Alfred_Chandler  business_history  HBS  historians  obituaries  Pulitzer_Prize 
may 2009 by jerryking
InfoViewer: The single-minded technologists
22-Dec-2005 | Financial Times |By Richard Waters

2005 was the year that Mr Brin and Mr Page's big idea came of age –
though they have yet to prove that they can secure a place for Google in
business history as more than just another, albeit spectacular,
internet flash-in-the-pan.
business_history  Google  search  backlash  experimentation  Richard_Waters 
march 2009 by jerryking
Bankers Need More Skin in the Game: Glassman and Nolan Say Private Partnerships Would Increase Risk Aversion Among Executives - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 25, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | byJAMES K. GLASSMAN
and WILLIAM T. NOLAN. Op-ed piece.

(1) Partnerships may be a more trustworthy business model than
corporations.
(2) Alfred Chandler, the great business historian, said that "strategy
determines structure." Similarly, structure determines behavior.
Wall_Street  financial  crisis  risk-taking  risk-management  partnerships  financial_institutions  strategy  strategic_thinking  organizational_structure  behaviours  trustworthiness  risk-aversion  risk-preferences  skin_in_the_game  risks  Alfred_Chandler  human_behavior  business_history 
february 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read