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jerryking : campaigns   16

7 Closing Strategies to Double Your Average Sale Size
August 11 | Entrepreneur Magazine | Marc Wayshak - GUEST WRITER
Your success depends on closing bigger, better deals. Put your time and energy into prospects with the power to make large investments and introduce you to others who can do the same.

1. Get over your fear.
Many salespeople are simply too scared to sell to huge companies...... large companies face the same problems as your small customers do, just on a bigger scale. This means they need a bigger version of your solution -- and they have the budget to match. Get over your fear.

2. Stand apart from the crowd.
High-level prospects hear from an average of 10 salespeople every day. If you do what everyone else is doing, you’ll never get through to them or earn their trust. To double your average sales size, you must be intentional about standing apart from the crowd in your industry. While others pitch, you should ask questions. While others are enthusiastic, you should be low-key and genuine. While your competitors focus on their products, you should focus on your prospect’s deepest frustrations and show how you can solve them.

3. Stop selling to low-level prospects.
Selling low-level prospects harms your close rate and decreasing your average sale size. Low-level prospects simply don’t have the power or budget to tell you “yes." They’re not the decision-makers. If you want to increase the size of your sales, stop selling to prospects who lack the budget to invest in your solution.

4. Sell to decision-makers.
It’s a best practice to head straight to the top of the food chain and sell to directors, vice presidents, and C-level executives. They have the power and budget to say “yes” to your offer. If someone refers you back down the chain, you’re still landing an introduction to the right person -- by his or her boss, no less.

5. Stop cold-calling.
Cold calls are miserable. Try implementing a sales-prospecting campaign. Plan your calls, letters and emails as follow-ups to a valuable letter or package you send via FedEx. This could be a special report, unique sample or company analysis. These intentional, repeated touches over a series of months will set you up as a familiar name by the time you actually get your prospect on the phone. When a huge sale is on the line, you can afford to invest time and money to catch a single prospect’s attention.

6. Know the decision-making process.
If you’ve closed only small deals at small companies in the past, you might be accustomed to working with just one or two decision-makers at a time. In large corporations, the decision-making process can be much more complicated. One of the biggest mistakes salespeople make is failing to understand the decision-making process. Get a grasp of this early on, and you can stay in front of the right people, build value for them and close your sales at higher prices.

7. Leverage sales for introductions.
When you close one large sale at a big organization, don’t stop there. Ask new customers for introductions to others in their company or network who could benefit from your offering. You have nothing to lose by asking for introductions, but failure to do so will cost you massive opportunity and revenue.
Gulliver_strategies  sales  fear  large_companies  differentiation  sales_cycle  buyer_choice_rejection  cold_calling  referrals  prospects  JCK  executive_management  campaigns  Aimia  LBMA  strategic_thinking  close_rate  questions  thinking_big  enterprise_clients  C-suite  low-key  authenticity  doubling  the_right_people 
august 2017 by jerryking
U.S. Cyberweapons, Used Against Iran and North Korea, Are a Disappointment Against ISIS - The New York Times
By DAVID E. SANGER and ERIC SCHMITT JUNE 12, 2017.

In 2016, U.S. cyberwarriors began training their arsenal of cyberweapons on a more elusive target, internet use by the Islamic State. Thus far, the results have been a consistent disappointment......The effectiveness of the nation’s arsenal of cyberweapons hit its limits against an enemy that exploits the internet largely to recruit, spread propaganda and use encrypted communications, all of which can be quickly reconstituted after American “mission teams” freeze their computers or manipulate their data..... the U.S. is rethinking how cyberwarfare techniques, first designed for fixed targets like nuclear facilities, must be refashioned to fight terrorist groups that are becoming more adept at turning the web into a weapon......one of the rare successes against the Islamic State belongs at least in part to Israel, which was America’s partner in the attacks against Iran’s nuclear facilities. Top Israeli cyberoperators penetrated a small cell of extremist bombmakers in Syria months ago, the officials said. That was how the United States learned that the terrorist group was working to make explosives that fooled airport X-ray machines and other screening by looking exactly like batteries for laptop computers......ISIS' agenda and tactics make it a particularly tough foe for cyberwarfare. The jihadists use computers and social media not to develop or launch weapons systems but to recruit, raise money and coordinate future attacks.

Such activity is not tied to a single place, as Iran’s centrifuges were, and the militants can take advantage of remarkably advanced, low-cost encryption technologies. The Islamic State, officials said, has made tremendous use of Telegram, an encrypted messaging system developed largely in Germany......disruptions often require fighters to move to less secure communications, making them more vulnerable. Yet because the Islamic State fighters are so mobile, and their equipment relatively commonplace, reconstituting communications and putting material up on new servers are not difficult.
ISIS  NSA  security_&_intelligence  disappointment  Israel  encryption  disruption  London  London_Bridge  tools  cyber_security  cyberweapons  vulnerabilities  terrorism  Pentagon  U.S._Cyber_Command  campaigns  David_Sanger 
june 2017 by jerryking
Putin Is Waging Information Warfare. Here’s How to Fight Back. - The New York Times
By MARK GALEOTTIDEC. 14, 2016

the United States and its allies should pursue a strategy of deterrence by denial. Mr. Putin shouldn’t fear retaliation for his information warfare — he should fear that he will fail.

There are several ways to go about this. First, United States institutions need better cybersecurity defenses. Political parties and major newspapers are now targets just as much as the power grid and the Pentagon are. The government has to help provide security when it can — but people have a duty to be more vigilant and recognize that their cybersecurity is about protecting the country, not just their own email accounts. ....Finally, Mr. Putin’s own vanity could be turned into a weapon against him. Every time he overreaches, the American government should point it out. Every time he fails, we need to say so loudly and clearly. We should tell jokes about him. He can rewrite the record in Russia, but the West does not have to contribute to his mythmaking — and we should stop building him up by portraying him as a virtual supervillain.
cyberattacks  Vladimir_Putin  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  retaliation  security_&_intelligence  punitive  phishing  deterrence  economic_warfare  blacklists  retribution  disinformation  campaigns  destabilization  Russia  information_warfare  delegitimization  deception  overreach  power_grid 
december 2016 by jerryking
U.S. Directs Cyberweapons at ISIS for First Time - The New York Times
APRIL 24, 2016 | NYT | By DAVID E. SANGER.

The United States has opened a new line of combat against the Islamic State, directing the military’s six-year-old Cyber Command for the first time to mount computer-network attacks that are now being used alongside more traditional weapons....The NSA, which specializes in electronic surveillance, has for years listened intensely to the militants of the Islamic State, and those reports are often part of the president’s daily intelligence briefing. But the N.S.A.’s military counterpart, Cyber Command, was focused largely on Russia, China, Iran and North Korea — where cyberattacks on the United States most frequently originate — and had run virtually no operations against what has become the most dangerous terrorist organization in the world...The goal of the new campaign is to disrupt the ability of the Islamic State to spread its message, attract new adherents, circulate orders from commanders and carry out day-to-day functions, like paying its fighters....The N.S.A. has spent years penetrating foreign networks — the Chinese military, Russian submarine communications, Internet traffic and other targets — placing thousands of “implants” in those networks to allow it to listen in.

But those implants can be used to manipulate data or to shut a network down. That frequently leads to a battle between the N.S.A. civilians — who know that to make use of an implant is to blow its cover — and the military operators who want to strike back. N.S.A. officials complained that once the implants were used to attack, the Islamic State militants would stop the use of a communications channel and perhaps start one that was harder to find, penetrate or de-encrypt.
ISIS  cyber_warfare  NSA  security_&_intelligence  terrorism  cyberweapons  exploits  hackers  software_bugs  vulnerabilities  Pentagon  U.S._Cyber_Command  campaigns  David_Sanger 
april 2016 by jerryking
What a Year of Job Rejections Taught Me About Pitching Myself
SEPTEMBER 09, 2015 | HBR | Nina Mufleh.
[send to Nick Patel]
After sending out hundreds of copies of my résumé to dozens of companies over the last year, I realized that I was getting nowhere because my approach was wrong....How could a career that ranged from working with royalty to Fortune 500 brands and startups not pique the curiosity of any hiring managers?

As a marketer, I decided to re-frame the challenge. Instead of thinking as a job applicant, I had to think of myself as a product and identify ways to create demand around hiring me. I applied everything I knew about marketing and storytelling to build a campaign that would show Silicon Valley companies the kind of value I would bring to their teams.

The experiment was a report that I created for Airbnb that highlighted the promise and potential of expanding to the Middle East, a market that I am extremely familiar with and until recently they had not focused on. I spent a couple of days gathering data about the tourism industry and the company’s current footprint in the market, and identified strategic opportunities for them there.

I released the report on Twitter and copied Airbnb’s founders and leadership team. Behind the scenes, I also shared it by email with many personal and professional contacts and encouraged them to share it if they thought it was interesting — most did, as did some of the top VCs, entrepreneurs and many peers around the world....What I realize in hindsight is probably one of the most important lessons of my career so far. The project highlighted the qualities I wanted to show to recruiters; more importantly, it also addressed one of the main weaknesses they saw in me....What the report helped me do was show, not tell, my value beyond their doubts. It refocused my perceived weakness into a strength: an international perspective with the promise of understanding and entering new markets. And though none of the roles that I interviewed for in the last two months focused on expansion, by addressing and challenging the weakness, I was able to re-frame the conversation around my strengths....asking yourself a different version of that question is going to make you better prepared for any conversation with a recruiter, a potential client, or even a potential investor....not “What is my weakness?” but rather “What do they perceive as a weakness in my background?”
Airbnb  campaigns  career_paths  creating_demand  Fortune_500  founders  HBR  hindsight  inbound_marketing  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  Middle_East  networking  personal_branding  pitches  problem_framing  reframing  rejections  self-promotion  social_media  strengths  value_propositions  via:enochko  weaknesses 
september 2015 by jerryking
Digital rethink: Google's new high-tech pitch to marketers - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, May. 05 2014,

The former chief marketing officer of L’Oreal Canada is just a few weeks into her new role at Google Canada as the liaison with marketing executives like her. She’ll be selling marketers on how Google can play a bigger role in their communication with customers. Her role – director of consumer packaged goods and branding for Canada – did not exist before. (She is also marketing director for Quebec.)...Within the past year, Google has been making a greater effort to woo both advertisers and their agencies on its technology. At its root is an attempt to get a bigger slice of ad budgets by persuading clients and agencies to think about digital as a more central part of their advertising....“In old marketing it used to be, if we had the right price, the right communication in the marketing, the right [point of purchase strategy] and the right TV ad, we were great,” she said. “The brand ecosystem has enlarged. It’s not about when the brand wants to talk to the consumer; it’s when the consumer feels like hearing it … it’s the consumer coming to the brand where it’s relevant – assuming the brand is there.”...But Google wants to show marketers how others have used its APIs – the coding that can enable digital campaigns – so that they can see what already exists without needing to build a campaign from scratch.

“Marketers understand they need to talk the way consumers talk,” Ms. Lamothe said. “… They don’t see it as, ‘Here’s a campaign from this brand, and then three months later there’s another campaign.’ They just think of the brand. If it’s always on, it always exists, and I find the brand where they’re relevant. The consumer is way ahead of the industry in the way they consume digital, because they make it part of their everyday life … and yet we don’t market that way.”
APIs  brands  campaigns  Susan_Krashinsky  marketing  Google  L'Oreal  CMOs  digital_media  advertising_agencies  advertising  LBMA  CPG 
june 2014 by jerryking
An online revolution - How new digital technologies will change the Canadian political landscape    
Mar 28 2012 | | Campaigns & Elections | by Geoff Sharpe.

Part of the problem is that money plays less of a role in Canadian politics than American politics. Donation and spending limits mean campaigns must use funds cautiously. Innovation is often stifled in favor of the status quo. Campaigns create a website, tweet to their followers and call it digital strategy. South of the border, campaigns and professional consultants invest heavily in client relationship management (CRM) software, data infrastructure and sophisticated outreach tools. Only major parties and well-financed campaigns can afford these technologies; smaller municipal and advocacy campaigns lack advanced tools to capitalize on the emerging and increasingly important digital landscape....Upstart campaign technologies are easy to use, cost very little and can be extraordinary powerful. One such platform is NationBuilder, which provides a number of cutting-edge digital tools including a free website, a social CRM system, fundraising software, campaign database and email service all in one integrated package. Prices start at $20 a month and rise depending on the size of the database....

Geoff Sharpe is an experienced digital and online organizer and currently works for Navigator Ltd. as a digital strategy consultant. He can be reached at gsharpe@navltd.com
Canada  political_campaigns  CRM  Canadian  SaaS  elections  tools  NationBuilder  campaigns 
january 2014 by jerryking
The Unlobbyists - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS B. EDSALL
Published: December 31, 2013

‘relationship lobbying’ is dead, or at least not where the growth will be.” The traditional lobbyist, he argues, is no longer the éminence grise of days past but instead has been reduced to serving as a conduit for campaign contributions from corporate and trade association PACs to candidates.

The action has shifted to what is known in the business as strategic advice: how to convince and mobilize voters and opinion elites in support of a client’s agenda.... So what does this new strategic adviser actually do? He or she can plan out a legislative campaign or a drive to affect the implementation of regulation, determine which officials and agencies must be dealt with, and propose potential coalition partners.

Interestingly, all this can be done without making direct contact with elected officials, congressional aides or top-ranked department and agency appointees and employees. This arms-length approach permits strategic advisers to avoid lobbying registration and reporting requirements.
campaign_contributions  lobbying  public_relations  Communicating_&_Connecting  Washington_D.C.  WPP  relationships  advice  campaigns  Inside_the_Beltway 
january 2014 by jerryking
Keys to a successful marketing campaign
Sept. 12, 2011 |G&M|Harvey Schachter.

Consider this article for Virgina of Fayeclack Communications

Marketing guidelines:1. Be noticeable: Engage consumers.Get them to think about your brand. 2. Be insight-based: Impactful campaigns must resonate with
some insight - a compelling, original observation about consumers or the
product category, based on research or chatting with consumers. 3. Be
memorable : Your ad must be remembered, e.g. Apple's 1984 ad jabbing at
IBM. 4. Be branded: It's important consumers remember the brand, and
that the ad supports & reinforces it. 5. Be "campaignable": A
single ad is not a campaign, but if effective should lead to one. 6. Be
differentiated: It's not enough to be remembered & to send a msg.
about being good - est. why your brand is better than its competition.7.
Be motivating to get people to actually do something.8 Be ethical:
Advertising is viewed with suspicion, so be above board. 9. Be
financially sustainable10. Be integrated: Able to deliver your msg. in a
complementary way through the various media.
marketing  ksfs  branding  Harvey_Schachter  campaigns  cross-platform  advertising  Waudware  insights  engagement  Apple  IBM 
september 2011 by jerryking
What is Scarce in Advocacy and Campaigns?
August 28, 2007 | NetCentric Advocacy | Ways for Campaigns
to be unique and offer something scarce... (things you have that others
don't in a mass marketing world)...

1. Real stories.
2. Genuine passion.
3. A base of real people that care about the issue.
4. Staff that have insights on the science, politics, policies and
dynamics at play that keep an issue form being solved.
5. The ability to convene people that care.
6. Clarity and purpose in a world of shallow consumerism
7. No need to make money while solving a problem ( can do things that
solve problems and loose money by design)
8. you have fun working on an issue most people would burn out on.
9. maybe truth and science to support your claims.
10. faith and confidence in your work.
advocacy  authenticity  campaigns  cause_marketing  passions  public_relations  scarcity  storytelling 
october 2010 by jerryking
Tip Sheet: Advocacy Advertising: More Than Slightly Alive
Sep 22, 2008.! PR News. ! Anonymous. Cost-conscious clients
make the fatal error of thinking earned media is a better route because
it is free media, as opposed to advertising (paid media). The most
ambitious earned media campaign can be more expensive and less effective
as a well-thought-out ad campaign. No longer can a clients measure the
success of an advocacy campaign solely by the # of news hits. Because
clients love metrics, they are drawn to many of the newer online tactics
that crank out multiple reports about how their msg. fared on the Web.
But before anyone writes the obituary on print publications, they may
want to consider that lawmakers, especially on Capitol Hill, continue to
rely on must-read publications, including The Hill, The Politico,
National Journal and The Weekly Standard. An October 2007 Nielsen
study, "Trust in Advertising," noted that ads in newspapers ranked
second worldwide among all media categories.
ProQuest  advertising  advocacy  metrics  newspapers  cause_marketing  campaigns  effectiveness 
october 2010 by jerryking
Obama Ran a Capitalist Campaign - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 7, 2008 | WSJ | by BRET SWANSON. Like every
entrepreneur, Mr. Obama's rise was improbable. An unusually-named,
African-American first-term senator defeated two of the most powerful
incumbent political brands, the Clintons and John McCain. Like many
upstarts, he won by changing the rules of the game."What ultimately
transformed the presidential race...was not the money that poured in
from Silicon Valley but the technology and the ethos."
Obama  rules_of_the_game  Clayton_Christensen  campaigns  John_McCain  Campaign_2008  political_campaigns 
may 2009 by jerryking
Hillary and MLK - WSJ.com
Op-ed by John McWhorter on the fuss over Hillary Clinton's
remark about President Johnson involvement in, and contributions to, in
the Civil Rights struggles of the 1960s.
African-Americans  clinton  MLK  John_McWhorter  campaigns  Hillary_Clinton  civil_rights  LBJ  '60s 
january 2009 by jerryking

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