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Why Can’t We Stop Pancreatic Cancer?
Sept. 23, 2019 | The New York Times | By Jane E. Brody.

Although pancreatic cancer is a relatively uncommon malignancy, accounting for only 3 percent of life-threatening cancers over all, it is one of medicine’s most challenging. Aside from avoiding smoking, obesity and Type 2 diabetes, there is little a person can do to prevent it, and there is nothing comparable to mammography or colonoscopy to screen for it in seemingly healthy individuals when it is most amenable to cure.

Among the small minority of patients — like Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg — who are cured of this disease, it is nearly always discovered accidentally at a very early symptom-free stage during an unrelated medical procedure. By the time this cancer produces symptoms, it has nearly always spread beyond the pancreas. In fact, surgery is a treatment option in relatively few patients because the cancer is usually already too advanced at diagnosis for surgery to have survival value......A large part of the problem with early detection lies with the location and size of this vital organ. The pancreas is a source of enzymes that facilitate digestion and of the hormone insulin that regulates blood sugar, making it available to tissues for energy. It is a mere six inches long sitting deep in the abdomen behind the stomach and surrounded by the spleen, liver and small intestine.

Therefore, you’d be unlikely to feel the presence of a small pancreatic tumor, and any early symptoms that might result from one, such as loss of appetite, are easily attributed to something far less ominous. Nor would you or an examining doctor be able to notice a premalignant lesion, as can happen with cancers of the cervix, colon and skin.........Further complicating early detection is the speed at which pancreatic cancer seems to progress. According to Dr. Lennon and coauthors, recent study findings “suggest that early stage pancreatic cancers often invade the veins, which drain directly to the liver and result in early metastatic spread,” which may explain why only 10 percent of patients have localized disease at diagnosis.......Meanwhile, it may help extend survival in some people if they recognize symptoms of pancreatic cancer and act on them without delay. Possible symptoms include loss of appetite, abdominal pain that radiates to the back, new-onset diabetes in someone over 50, jaundice, itchy skin, a change in how alcohol tastes, and pale odd-smelling feces that float.
cancers  risks  diabetes  howto  pancreas  risk_factors  symptoms 
24 days ago by jerryking
How exactly does fat cause cancer?
July 22, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by PAUL TAYLOR.

our understanding of fat has gone through a huge transformation in recent years.

It was once thought that fat – medically known as adipose tissue – was just an inert collection of cells used for the storage of surplus calories, or energy, that we can draw upon in times of need.

But now medical experts realize that fat behaves almost like an organ – interacting with other parts of the body. It actually sends out signals that play a crucial role in regulating metabolism, the immune system and other functions. If we become overweight or obese, the normal running of the body can get knocked off balance by too many signals from fat.

There are several ways in which fat may contribute to the development of a variety of cancers:

(1) fat can be converted to estrogen – a hormone that is known to fuel the growth of some ovarian, endometrial (the membrane lining the uterus) and breast cancers.

(2) Fat also creates a state of chronic inflammation – another factor linked to cancer. The inflammatory process is associated with free radicals, unstable oxygen molecules that can damage DNA and cause potentially cancerous genetic mutations.

(3) excess weight often leads to a condition known as insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose (or sugar) from the blood stream into cells where it is used for energy. As the body’s cells become resistant to insulin, the pancreas responds by producing more and more of the hormone in an attempt to clear glucose from the bloodstream. Elevated levels of insulin and related substances – such as insulin-like growth factor-1 – stimulate cells to divide and multiply. This increased activity may lead to random genetic mutations that set the stage for cancer.

(4) People with excessive weight around the abdomen are prone to gastric reflux (or heartburn), in which digestive juices will back up into the tube connecting the mouth to the stomach. The constant irritation can damage cells and may lead to esophageal cancer.

(5) Dietary and lifestyle factors that may contribute to weight gain are also directly linked to an increased cancer risk. For example, diets rich in red meats and highly processed foods have been implicated in colorectal and other cancers.

People who tend to eat lots of fresh fruits and vegetables and whole grains are consuming a host of micronutrients that may help guard against cancer. Likewise, studies suggest that regular exercise may be protective, too.
cancers  colorectal  cured_and_smoked  diets  digestive_systems  exercise  fats  healthy_lifestyles  immune_system  inflammation  insulin  meat  risk_factors 
12 weeks ago by jerryking
Opinion | How Cancer Changes Hope
Dec. 28, 2018 | The New York Times | By Kate Bowler. Ms. Bowler is the author of “Everything Happens for a Reason: And Other Lies I’ve Loved.”

“That was Lucius Seneca, the ancient philosopher of Stoicism,” he said, laughing. “Look, it takes great courage to live as if each day counts. That was a fundamental insight of Stoicism. But we Christians are a people who must live into the future.”
books  cancers  dying  faith  hope  living_in_the_moment  op-ed  Stoics 
january 2019 by jerryking
Is Eating Deli Meats Really That Bad for You?
Dec. 14, 2018 | The New York Times | By Roni Caryn Rabin.

Q. Is eating deli meats really that bad? Does it make a difference if it’s organic, nitrate-free or uncured? Yes, it's bad, no it doesn't make much of a difference.

A. Meat and poultry are excellent sources of protein, B vitamins and certain minerals, but consuming even small amounts of processed meat increases the risk of colorectal cancer.

“We see a 4 percent increase in the risk of cancer even at 15 grams a day, which is a single slice of ham on a sandwich,” ......Eating a more typical serving of 50 grams of processed meat a day would increase the risk of colorectal cancer by 18 percent, a 2011 review of studies found.

Unprocessed red meat, by comparison, increases cancer risk only at amounts greater than 100 grams a day, and the evidence for that link is limited, ..... people should “limit” red meat but “avoid” processed meat.

There is some evidence suggesting an association between processed meat and stomach cancer. And a recent study found an increased risk of breast cancer among women who ate the most processed meats.

Processed meat refers to any meat, including pork, poultry, lamb, goat or others, that has been salted, smoked, cured, fermented or otherwise processed for preservation or to enhance the flavor. The category includes hot dogs, ham, bacon and turkey bacon, corned beef, pepperoni, salami, smoked turkey, bologna and other luncheon and deli meats, sausages, corned beef, biltong or beef jerky, canned meat and meat-based preparations and sauces, among others.
cancers  colorectal  cured_and_smoked  delicatessens  meat  mens'_health 
december 2018 by jerryking
Sandra Day O’Connor, first female justice on U.S. Supreme Court, reveals she has dementia - The Globe and Mail
OCTOBER 23, 2018 | THE NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | MATTHEW HAAG.

Ms. O’Connor was born in El Paso, Texas, and grew up in Arizona on the Lazy B Ranch, 250 square miles of high desert along the state’s border with New Mexico. Her upbringing has remained a point of pride, and she has often referred to herself as a cowgirl.

“It is possible to survive and even make a living in that formidable terrain,” she wrote in her memoir of her childhood, “Lazy B,” in 2002. “The Day family did it for years; but it was never easy. It takes planning, patience, skill and endurance.”

She left Arizona for Stanford Law School, where she finished third in her class in 1952. It was also where she met her future husband, a fellow law-review editor at the university.

The top graduate in her class was William H. Rehnquist, the future chief justice, who received a clerkship on the Supreme Court.
cancers  civics  dementia  judges  lawyers  Sandra_Day_O'Connor  trailblazers  U.S._Supreme_Court  women  Alzheimer’s_disease 
october 2018 by jerryking
How to Minimize Pancreatic Cancer Risk - The New York Times
By Jane E. Brody
July 23, 2018

In most of the approximately 6 percent of five-year survivors, pancreatic cancer is discovered early quite by accident, usually during a scan or surgery for some other reason.....The pancreas is a small two-part glandular organ — about 7 inches long and 1.5 inches wide — lying in the upper abdomen behind the stomach. It performs two vital functions. One part of the gland is a source of digestive enzymes and the other part produces the hormones insulin and glucagon that control blood levels of glucose and fatty acids.

Some known risk factors for pancreatic cancer are beyond an individual’s control: older age, being an African-American or Ashkenazi Jew and having two or more first-degree relatives (parents or siblings) who have had the cancer.

But it is the modifiable risk factors that are currently of greatest concern. Aside from tobacco smoking, which accounts for 20 percent to 25 percent of pancreatic cancers even as this risk factor continues to decline, the main risks for pancreatic cancer cases and deaths are obesity, Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, all of which have risen to epidemic levels in recent years.....be alert to the possibility of hidden cancer in patients newly diagnosed with diabetes who are 50 or older, have no family history of the disease, are losing weight and their diabetes is not controlled by oral medication......Early diagnosis is vital because pancreatic cancer is highly resistant to most therapies and often recurs after surgery. Currently, only 20 percent of cancers are even eligible for surgery, she said. The pancreas is next to very large blood vessels and when the tumor involves them, it cannot safely be removed.

One bright spot for people with diabetes: The drug metformin, often used by patients to help control blood sugar, has in some studies been associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer and improved survival chances for those who develop the cancer. This drug, which has also been linked to longevity and healthy aging, is an inexpensive generic with an excellent safety record.
cancers  risks  diabetes  howto  pancreas  risk_factors 
july 2018 by jerryking
5 books worth reading this summer
May 21, 2018 | | LinkedIn| Bill Gates

Leonardo da Vinci, by Walter Isaacson. I think Leonardo was one of the most fascinating people ever. Although today he’s best known as a painter, Leonardo had an absurdly wide range of interests, from human anatomy to the theater...... A worthy follow-up to Isaacson’s great biographies of Albert Einstein and Steve Jobs.

Everything Happens for a Reason and Other Lies I’ve Loved, by Kate Bowler.

Lincoln in the Bardo, by George Saunders. I thought I knew everything I needed to know about Abraham Lincoln, but this novel made me rethink parts of his life. It blends historical facts from the Civil War with fantastical elements—it’s basically a long conversation among 166 ghosts, including Lincoln’s deceased son.

Origin Story: A Big History of Everything, by David Christian.

Factfulness, by Hans Rosling, with Ola Rosling and Anna Rosling Ronnlund.
billgates  books  booklists  Abraham_Lincoln  biographies  cancers  facts  Hans_Rosling  Leonardo_da_Vinci  origin_story  polymaths  summertime  Walter_Isaacson  Geoge_Saunders 
may 2018 by jerryking
Black Cancer Matters
MARCH 15, 2018 | The New York Times | By SUSAN GUBAR.

the economic consequences of racial discrimination increase cancer risk.....putting into play the words “race” and “cancer,” .....ponder the impact of race on cancer outcomes nationally — disentangled from local ecological factors. The big picture is grim.

A 2016 report of the American Cancer Society states that the “five-year relative survival is lower for blacks than whites for most cancers at each stage of diagnosis.” African-American men, for example, are twice as likely to die from prostate cancer. Experts continue to debate why, even as many ascribe this scandalous phenomenon to inequalities in access to screening and treatment.

In women’s cancer, the mortality gap has widened. According to the 2016-18 report on Cancer Facts and Figures for African-Americans, “despite lower incidence rates for breast and uterine cancers, black women have death rates for these cancers that are 42% and 92% higher, respectively, than white women.” Investigators connect the ghastly numbers to the usual socioeconomic discrepancies but also to biological differences in the malignancies of black women.

With regard to breast cancer, is the mortality gap related to a greater percentage of black women than white women contending with an aggressive form of the disease that lacks estrogen receptors?

Dr. Otis Webb Brawley, the chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, rejects an explanation based on “biological difference,” pointing instead to dietary disparities....“The black-white gap in the onset of menstruation and body weight has dramatically widened, which means that the disease disparities will widen also.”

Disadvantaged Americans consume more calories and carbohydrates, “the sort of food that is available in poor areas of inner cities,”..... “Poverty is a carcinogen.”

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isn't just about race-- watch the trailer in which blacks and whites say the very same things about being poisoned by the Koch brothers' companies. This is a story about social justice and lack of sufficient government regulation of the enterprises owned by the "donor" class that owns most of our politicians. The most accurate predictor of people's life expectancy is their zip code [http://fortune.com/2017/05/08/us-life-expectancy-study/]. If you life in a polluted poisoned environment, you will suffer the consequences regardless of race.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
mortality  cancers  African-Americans  women  racial_disparities  the_big_picture  prostate  economically_disadvantaged  racial_discrimination 
march 2018 by jerryking
Red Meat Increases Risk of Dying From 8 Diseases
MAY 15, 2017 | The New York Times | By NICHOLAS BAKALAR.

The more red meat you eat, the greater your risk of dying from one of eight diseases, according to a new report.

Researchers studied more than 536,000 men and women ages 50 to 71, tracking their diet and health for an average of 16 years. They recorded intake of total meat, processed and unprocessed red meat (beef, lamb and pork), and white meat (poultry and fish).

Compared with the one-fifth of people who ate the least red meat, the one-fifth who ate the most had a 26 percent increased risk of death from various causes. High red meat consumption increased the rate of dying from cancer, heart disease, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes, infections, kidney disease and liver disease. The study is in BMJ.

White meat, on the other hand, may be good for you. The researchers found that those who ate the highest proportion of white meat had a 25 percent reduced risk of dying from various causes compared with those who ate the least white meat.
meat  pork  lamb  dying  cured_and_smoked  chicken  dish  diets  disease  cancers 
august 2017 by jerryking
Well-Done Steak Without Shame - WSJ
By HILARY POTKEWITZ
April 1, 2017

Here is how I cook my steaks without pink on the inside but still tender.
Salt it at least an hour before and bring it to room temperature before cooking. Optional: I marinate my steaks some times for 4 hours in soy sauce, wine, some sugar, touch of oyster sauce and garlic.
Cook as you would cook medium rare in a hot cast iron pan 3-5 minutes each side.
While you are cooking in hot pan, heat the oven to 350.
Take the steak out of the pan and slice it across appx 3/4 inch to one inch thick.
Return to cast iron pan and put in the oven for 5-7 minutes or more so that you do not see pink. If marinated, you can put the sliced steak in the oven with marinade leftover on top of steak and leave in the oven till the marinade is boiling hot.
meat  steaks  cancers  BBQ  grilling  mens'_health  rubs_sauces_marinades 
april 2017 by jerryking
Prostate cancer? Relax, and don’t rush your treatment - The Globe and Mail
ANDRÉ PICARD
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 20, 2016

a landmark study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, has provided some stark data on the benefits, risks and necessity of treatment for men with low- or medium-risk prostate cancer (meaning they have a Gleason score of 6-7).

Related: What's the best method of screening for prostate cancer?

The uplifting news is that, a decade after diagnosis, 99 per cent of men with early prostate cancer are still alive. The sort-of-surprising news is that mortality rates don’t really vary depending on type of treatment, or whether a man is treated at all. .....The other element of this story, which is not part of the new research, is about the effectiveness and appropriateness of testing. Another study published recently showed that digital rectal examination is a poor way of detecting prostate cancer and shouldn’t be done because it provides “maximal pain for minimal gain.”

PSA testing, for its part, is one of the most controversial issues in the cancer field. It doesn’t actually detect cancer, but elevated PSA levels trigger biopsies and often lead to a cascade of overtreatment. In Canada, routine PSA tests are not recommended.

What we really need is a test that shows if prostate cancer, once detected, will prove aggressive and deadly or not, and we don’t have that. Prostate cancer kills 4,100 Canadian men a year, but it’s not by doing more and earlier testing and more aggressive treatment that we will necessarily reduce that number. That’s a hard message to digest, and deliver.
cancers  mens'_health  André_Picard  health  PSA  prostate  overtreatment  thinking_deliberatively  reflections  contextual  timeouts  latency 
september 2016 by jerryking
Gord Downie’s Canada: Barstool bard has a lasting legacy of enigmatic erudition - The Globe and Mail
BRAD WHEELER
The Globe and Mail Last updated: Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Although it’s one of the most successful rock bands in Canadian history, the Tragically Hip’s true-north appeal has never been matched outside the country; the lack of American validation, however, is seen by fans as a point of pride – a Canadian success story on its own terms.
Brad_Wheeler  music  cancers  Canadiana  Canadian  Gord_Downie  songwriters  singers  legacies  patriotism  authenticity  Tragically_Hip  poets  rock-'n'-roll 
may 2016 by jerryking
Chance of getting second cancer diagnosis on the rise - The Globe and Mail
MARILYNN MARCHIONE
The Associated Press
Published Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2015
cancers 
august 2015 by jerryking
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter reveals he has cancer - The Globe and Mail
LETITIA STEIN AND DAVID ADAMS
Reuters
Published Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015
cancers  Jimmy_Carter 
august 2015 by jerryking
Percy Sledge, Who Sang 'When A Man Loves a Woman,' Dies - NYTimes.com
APRIL 14, 2015| By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A No. 1 hit in 1966, "When a Man Loves a Woman" was Sledge's debut single, an almost unbearably heartfelt ballad with a resonance he never approached again. Few singers could have. Its mood set by a mournful organ and dirge-like tempo, "When a Man Loves a Woman" was for many the definitive soul ballad, a testament of blinding, all-consuming love haunted by fear and graced by overwhelming emotion.

The song was a personal triumph for Sledge, who seemed on the verge of sobbing throughout the production, and a breakthrough for Southern soul.
obituaries  singers  African-Americans  Muscle_Shoals  cancers  '60s  music  Percy_Sledge  southern_soul 
april 2015 by jerryking
Midlife fitness may lower risk of some cancers later
Mar 26, 2015 | Reuters | BY KATHRYN DOYLE.
Midlife fitness may lower risk of some cancers later
cancers  midlife  fitness  mens'_health  colorectal  exercise 
april 2015 by jerryking
First your cancer diagnosis, now some advice - The Globe and Mail
VENETIA BUTLER
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jan. 12 2015

Fighting cancer is a difficult journey, but you will get through this. I am rooting for you.
cancers  advice  inspiration  affirmations 
january 2015 by jerryking
Stuart Scott, ESPN Anchor, Dies at 49 - WSJ
By ANDREW BEATON
Updated Jan. 5, 2015

“When you die, it does not mean that you lose to cancer,” Mr. Scott said in accepting the award. “You beat cancer by how you live, why you live, and in the manner in which you live.”
obituaries  tributes  cancers  sports  African-Americans  television  ESPN  sportscasting 
january 2015 by jerryking
Political warrior Rod Love shook up the establishment - The Globe and Mail
JUSTIN GIOVANNETTI
EDMONTON — The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Nov. 02 2014
obituaries  Alberta  politics  cancers  chief_of_staff 
november 2014 by jerryking
Five Steps to Lower the Risk of Breast Cancer - The Experts - WSJ
Sep 15, 2014 | WSJ | Marissa Weiss.

The top five breast-healthy steps are:

1) Get to and stick to a healthy weight
2) Exercise regularly: three-to four hours a week (five-to seven are even better)
3) Stop smoking
4) Follow a Mediterranean diet
5) Limit your alcohol to five or fewer drinks a week (3 or fewer is even better). Equivalent drinks relative to alcohol content are: 12 oz beer, 5 oz wine, 1.5 oz hard liquor

Also,
#1 of the five steps should be: know your family history, #2 should be talk to a professional genetic counselor about your risks, #3 should be eating a plant-heavy diet, and #4 should be regular exercise. Quite frankly, #5 should be to try to take a “mindful” approach to life which has been proven to have physical and mental health benefits.
cancers  exercise  fitness  mindsets  healthy_lifestyles  risk_factors 
september 2014 by jerryking
Hair dyes linked to cancer-causing compounds - The Globe and Mail
compounds Add to ...
KATHRYN DOYLE
Reuters
Published Wednesday, Jun. 11 2014
cancers  personal_grooming 
august 2014 by jerryking
Physician and cancer survivor shares what cancer patients really want to hear - The Globe and Mail
GAYLE MACDONALD
The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jul. 27 2014

It was a scary and uncertain time for the St. John’s resident, but rather than wallow in self-pity as he underwent aggressive chemotherapy, he blogged about his cancer experience (which later became a CBC Radio miniseries). In March, he published The End of Suffering, a book of personal musings, to give hope to other cancer patients.... people dealing with cancer aren't looking for any pity or sympathy. They want normalcy and they want laughter.

What did cancer teach you about life, love and being a doctor?

Cancer taught me to be happy. Every day you stay miserable is a day wasted.

I think you find out who loves you most when the chips are down. It’s easy to love people when everything is going well, but the real enduring, beautiful love persists in the space of adversity.

As a doctor, it taught me that patients suffer and that suffering is what they want you, as a doctor, to remove. They don’t want you to give them a fancy diagnosis or an expensive drug.

What things should you not say to someone with cancer?

“What’s your prognosis?” Or more bluntly, are you going to live or die? I had someone ask me if I was going to die. I just kind of smiled at him and said, “Why, do you want my stereo?”

Healthy people should never give cancer patients health advice. There’s nothing worse than being sick and getting advice from the healthy, because it’s almost like insinuating you did something to make this happen to you.

Finally, don’t say, “Everything is going to be fine.” I don’t know I’m going to be fine. You don’t know I’m going to be fine. My doctor doesn’t know I’m going to be fine.

They mean well by saying that, but what they should say is, “I care about you and I want you to do well.”
bouncing_back  cancers  doctors  blogs  lessons_learned  advice  dying  conversations  stressful 
july 2014 by jerryking
China's Rural Pollution Problem - WSJ.com
July 27, 2013 | WSJ | By JOSH CHIN and BRIAN SPEGELE

China's Bad Earth
Industrialization has turned much of the Chinese countryside into an environmental disaster zone, threatening not only the food supply but the legitimacy of the regime itself....a series of recent cases have highlighted the spread of pollution outside of urban areas, now encompassing vast swaths of countryside, including the agricultural heartland.
pollution  environment  China  threats  farming  soils  cancers 
july 2013 by jerryking
Medium rare or well-done. Which kind of meat is healthier? - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 08 2013 | G&M | LESLIE BECK.

* Keep meat portions small to cut down on grilling time. The less time on the grill, the less time for HCAs to form. Instead of grilling a whole steak, barbecue kebabs since they cook more quickly.
* For meats that require longer cooking times, partially pre-cook in the microwave, drain away the juices, and then finish on the barbecue. Microwaving meat for two minutes prior to grilling can result in a significant reduction in HCAs.
* Marinate meat for 10 minutes before grilling. Ingredients in a marinade such as vinegar, citrus juice, vegetable oil and spices may prevent carcinogen formation.
* Cook at a lower temperature. Turn the gas down or wait for the charcoal to become low-burning embers.
When making burgers, add garlic and fresh chopped rosemary to the meat mixture before grilling. Both herbs have been shown to block the formation of HCAs. (In order to kill harmful bacteria that could be lurking in ground meat, beef burgers must be cooked to a safe internal temperature of 71C. Use a digital instant-red meat thermometer and check each patty.)
Leslie_Beck  meat  steaks  cancers  BBQ  grilling  mens'_health  rubs_sauces_marinades 
july 2013 by jerryking
Why fighting liver cancer remains ‘an uphill battle’ - The Globe and Mail
ANDRÉ PICARD

PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTER — The Globe and Mail

Published
Wednesday, May. 29 2013
cancers  André_Picard 
june 2013 by jerryking
Couples Facing the Ordeal of Cancer - NYTimes.com
May 27, 2013, 12:01 am 44 Comments
Battling Cancer Together
By JANE E. BRODY
cancers  relationships  marriage  Communicating_&_Connecting 
may 2013 by jerryking
Drug Conjugates: 'Guided Missiles' to Treat Cancer - WSJ.com
April 5, 2013 | WSJ | By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF.

The Guided-Missile Cancer Treatment
Drug conjugates attack specific tumor cells, rather than healthy and unhealthy cells alike
cancers 
may 2013 by jerryking
Can we just relax about our breasts? - The Globe and Mail
MARGARET WENTE

The Globe and Mail

Last updated Wednesday, Oct. 31 2012

the real problem isn’t jet fuel in our breasts. It’s chemophobia – a fear so rampant that it has infected an entire generation of women. Ms. Williams is right that our bodies contain trace amounts of pretty much everything that’s in our environment. But toxicity is a matter of degree. And technology is so advanced that we can measure trace amounts in parts per trillion. As yet, research has found no trace of harm. For example, after a comprehensive review of environmental causes and risk factors for breast cancer, the U.S. Institute of Medicine found no conclusive link between any of these chemicals and an increased risk of breast cancer. According to Scientific American, “some research shows the toxic load in breast milk to be smaller than that in the air most city dwellers breathe inside their homes.”

So what are the biggest risks for breast cancer? Getting old, and being female. “If you parse out all the things that cause breast cancer, about 75 per cent of it is living,” Harvey Schipper, one of Canada’s leading breast cancer doctors, told me. Much of the rest is hereditary. Other risk factors are bound up with our Western lifestyle – high-protein diets, early puberty, later and less frequent childbearing. “Societies with poor nutrition don’t get breast cancer,” he says.

This is not to say there’s no impact from environmental factors. But these effects are small and uncertain. To eliminate them all, we’d have to eliminate modernity and return to being hunter-gatherers again.

But I’m afraid chemophobia is here to stay. Fear sells. Fear of chemicals manufactured by rapacious, greedy, money-sucking capitalist enterprises sells even better.
ageing  cancers  chemicals  hunter-gatherers  Margaret_Wente  medical_communication  risk_factors  toxicity 
february 2013 by jerryking
Prostate Test Often Misses Cancer - WSJ.com
July 24, 2003 | WSJ |By DAVID ARMSTRONG | Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL.

Prostate Test Often Misses Cancer
Study's Finding Could Lead to More Biopsies And, Some Worry, Unnecessary Treatment
prostate  cancers 
january 2013 by jerryking
Informed Patient: New Prostate-Treatment Options - WSJ.com
May 20, 2004

New Options for Treatment Of Prostate Problems

By LAURA LANDRO
prostate  cancers 
january 2013 by jerryking
Living With Cancer: The Husks - NYTimes.com
December 7, 2012, 12:02 pm29 Comments
Living With Cancer: The Husks
By SUSAN GUBAR
inspiration  cancers 
december 2012 by jerryking
Rachel Carson’s Lessons, 50 Years After ‘Silent Spring’ - NYTimes.com
By NANCY F. KOEHN
Published: October 27, 2012

Rachel Carson, throughout her personal and public struggles, she was an informed spokeswoman for environmental responsibility.

She was a classic introvert who exhibited few of the typical qualities associated with leadership, like charisma and aggressiveness. But as people like Susan Cain, author of “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking,” have pointed out, leadership can come in less obvious forms.... her story is a reminder that one person’s quiet leadership can make a difference.... RACHEL CARSON’S story offers many leadership lessons, including the importance of persistence in pursuing an objective. When I discuss her with business executives, many are struck by her ability to stay focused on goals in the face of obstacles including severe illness.

Another lesson involves the importance of doing thorough research and taking the long view. A sense of context based on hard facts, along with a knowledge of history, is essential to understanding what’s at stake in difficult and uncertain situations. It also confers a sense of authority on the person who has acquired this knowledge.

A third insight concerns the juggling of personal demands and professional ambitions. Carson understood the challenge — and satisfaction — of dealing with our obligations to others even as we follow our professional drive. And she saw that this can rarely be navigated smoothly. For her, and for many executives with whom I have worked, times of great productivity were followed by fallow periods when ambitions had to be put aside for personal reasons.
solo  leadership  environment  cancers  women  non-obvious  trailblazers  books  introverts  contextual  long-term  history 
october 2012 by jerryking
Colon Cancer
November 1999| Essence | by Michele St. George
colons  colorectal  cancers  mens'_health 
september 2012 by jerryking
What I Learned from My Cancer Scare
Jun. 02, 2011 | TIME | By Dr. Mehmet Oz.
cancers 
august 2012 by jerryking
Nestlé bites into new market
December 15, 2006 | WSJ | Deborah Ball and Jeanne Whalen.

Acquisition from Novartis will provide entrée to pharma-like foods in the hopes of making medical-nutrition products taste good. Nestlé SA is betting on nutritionally engineered feeds for people with cancer or diabetes or for the elderly who struggle to keep on weight, in an unusual strategy for a maker of grocery-store food brands....Nestlé, the world’s biggest food company in terms of sales, hopes to expand the types of diseases it targets, while also tapping Novartis's relationships with hospitals, doctors and nursing homes. In turn, Nestlé’s expertise in flavours and packaging can help improve the taste and look of clinical nutrition items.
Big_Food  brands  Nestlé  cancers  aging  diabetes  nutrition  health_foods  flavours  packaging 
august 2012 by jerryking
The Education of Andy Grove
By RICHARD S. TEDLOW
December 12, 2005

(FORTUNE Magazine)
'If we got kicked out and the board brought in a new CEO, what do you think he would do?' Gordon answered without hesitation, 'He would get us out of memories.' I stared at him, numb, then said, 'Why shouldn't you and I walk out the door, come back, and do it ourselves?'"
Andy_Grove  profile  data_driven  cancers  critical_thinking  tough-mindedness 
may 2012 by jerryking
Stephens: A Lesson Before Dying - WSJ.com
December 13, 2011 | WSJ | By BRET STEPHENS.

A Lesson Before Dying
To bemoan illness after a good life seemed ungrateful.

"The good death has increasingly become a myth," wrote the Yale surgeon and bioethicist Sherwin Nuland in his 1993 prize-winning book "How We Die." Dying, in Dr. Nuland's eloquent telling, amounts to "a series of destructive events that involve by their very nature the disintegration of the dying person's humanity." Who can—who would dare—judge a man's worth when his mind and body are being picked bare by disease?...Cancer is a heist culminating in murder....To grow up is to understand that the confidence a parent radiates around his children is rarely the confidence the parent feels. I knew my father well enough to know his various fears and insecurities...All this meant that the diagnosis should have been devastating to him. Yet he never betrayed the slightest sign of fear...Yet my father maintained his usual sangfroid even when it became clear that there would be no getting well. There were no five stages of grief, no bouts of denial, anger, bargaining and depression....Throughout his life my father taught me many lessons: about language, history and philosophy; about ethics, loyalty and love. In the end, he taught me that death cannot destroy the dignity of a dignified man.

Charles J. Stephens, 1937-2011. May his memory be for a blessing.
dying  deaths  hospice  lessons_learned  cancers  Bret_Stephens  fatherhood  grief  palliative_care  end-of-life  books  dignity 
april 2012 by jerryking
Can the word cancer be more harmful than the disease?
Dec. 12, 2011 | The Globe and Mail | ANDRÉ PICARD |

Hippocrates is best known not for his naming of cancer but his admonition to physicians to, above all, do no harm.

Right now, our crude, imprecise use of the term cancer is doing harm. The words we use need to reflect our knowledge, and influence practice.
André_Picard  cancers  imprecision  naming  prostate 
april 2012 by jerryking
A Chinese Medicine as Cancer Treatment - WSJ.com
April 2, 2012, 6:56 p.m. ET

Chinese Medicine Goes Under the Microscope

By SHIRLEY S. WANG
cancers  mens'_health  colons  colorectal  digestive_systems  alternative_medicine  Chinese 
april 2012 by jerryking
10 surprising steps to staying cancer-free
March 29, 2012,| - Vital Signs - MarketWatch | by Kristen Gerencher,

Keep a predictable schedule.
Move frequently and avoid prolonged sitting.
Ditch the vitamins and supplements.
Get an annual flu shot.
If you’re over 40, talk with your doctor about the benefits and risks of taking a statin and low-dose daily aspirin if you’re not taking them already, he says.
Wear comfortable shoes.
Take inventory of your medicine cabinet once a year.
Cash in on healthy-living incentives.
Think of your doctor as a partner, not a friend.
Know yourself by keeping records of your medical data.
mens'_health  cancers  tips  doctor's_visits  record-keeping 
march 2012 by jerryking
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