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Canada can no longer rely on U.S. for global leadership, Freeland says - The Globe and Mail
ROBERT FIFE AND MICHELLE ZILIO
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jun. 06, 2017

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland says the Liberal government will make a “substantial investment” in the military because Canada can no longer rely on Washington for global leadership in the face of threats of Russian adventurism and the need to combat the “monstrous extremism” of Islamic State......Ms. Freeland said Canada has been able to count on the powerful U.S. military to provide a protective shield since 1945 as she argued this country needs to significantly build up the Canadian military with “a substantial investment” to help confront strategic threats to liberal democracies.

“To rely solely on the U.S. security umbrella would make us a client state,” she said. “To put it plainly: Canadian diplomacy and development sometimes requires the backing of hard power.”

Ms. Freeland listed North Korea, the civil war in Syria, the Islamic State, Russian aggression in the Ukraine and Baltic states and climate change as major threats to the global order.

“We will make the necessary investments in our military, to not only address years of neglect and underfunding, but also to place the Canadian Armed Forces on a new footing – with new equipment, training, resources and consistent and predictable funding,” she said.....The minister described how and why Canada’s role in the Second World War allowed the country to help shape the post-1945 multilateral order.

Canada has continued to play a large role in promoting multiculturalism and diversity and providing a home to the downtrodden – refugees fleeing persecution, famine or wars – she said. It has taken a strong stand on the world stage, promoting gender equality and a rule-based international order.
capabilities  U.S.foreign_policy  Donald_Trump  Canada  Canadian  foreign_policy  leadership  Chrystia_Freeland  ISIS  hard_power  sovereignty  WWII  post-WWII  world_stage 
june 2017 by jerryking
Fintech Fictions, Fallacies, and Fantasies
July 20, 2015 | Subscribe to The Financial Brand for Free

A Snarketing post by Ron Shevlin

There’s No Debate

Towards the end of the Great Debate (referenced at the beginning of this post), I suggested that the question at hand–Who would rule banking: fintech or banks?–was the wrong question to ask. There is no one or the other. Banks need fintech, fintech needs banks. And banks become fintech, as fintech become banks.

In many ways, fintech is a–or the–path to reinvention for many banks. This is why a Capital One acquires design firms, or a BBVA acquires a Simple. It’s not simply to acquire the technology, and certainly not to “usurp the threat of FinTech by co-opting it.” It’s to inject new thinking and new capabilities into the company.
fin-tech  myths  fantasies  financial_services  banks  symbiosis  large_companies  new_thinking  start_ups  capabilities  Fortune_500  brands  Capital_One  design  Simple  BBVA 
march 2017 by jerryking
Pimco’s Strategy for Life After Gross: Go Beyond ‘Bonds and Burgers’ - WSJ
By JUSTIN BAER
Updated Nov. 7, 2016

The 53-year-old Frenchman, who joined Pimco in the past week, intends to push it deeper into hedge funds, real-estate assets and other alternative investments, people familiar with the matter said. With interest rates in much of the developed world near zero, those kinds of investments are in demand from pensions, endowments and other clients. They are also among the types of funds that command higher fees.

Investing in bonds, loans and other forms of debt securities will remain Pimco’s focus, but Mr. Roman will aim to build out capabilities in areas ranging from private credit to quantitative investments based on computer models, the people said.....Pimco, a subsidiary of German insurer Allianz SE, believes the gradual shift into alternatives is its best bet to ride out what many industry executives expect will be a brutal shakeout for asset managers. Tepid returns and the surging popularity of cheaper investment options, including exchange-traded funds, have pressured managers to lower fees.
Pimco  CEOs  alternative_investments  asset_management  capabilities  money_management  ETFs  shakeouts  interest_rates  developed_countries  low-interest  developing_countries 
november 2016 by jerryking
5-Step Primer to Entering New Markets
| Inc.com | BY KARL STARK AND BILL STEWART, Co-founders, Avondale.

Expanding into a new market can be an effective way to leverage your core business for growth. But it takes a disciplined process to accurately assess the potential of each growth opportunity, because a bad bet can bog down your business.

Investing the appropriate level of resources in market analysis, selection, and entry method can create a foundation for success in the chosen market. We suggest following five steps to properly assess the opportunities and risks of a new market.

1. Define the Market
2. Perform Market Analysis
3. Assess Internal Capabilities
4. Prioritize and Select Markets
5. Develop Market Entry Options
marketing  growth  core_businesses  market_entry  new_markets  capabilities  frameworks  market_definition  market_analysis  self-assessment  market_opportunities  market_assessment  generating_strategic_options  assessments_&_evaluations  opportunities  Michael_McDerment  primers 
october 2016 by jerryking
U.S. Cyber Command Chief on What Threats to Fear the Most - WSJ
June 19, 2016 | WSJ |

But the types of threats that we worry most about today that are new are adversaries taking full control of our networks, losing control of our networks, having a hacker appear to be a trusted user......MS. BLUMENSTEIN: Extraordinary investments are required now for cybersecurity. But looked at another way, there’s an extraordinary cost to getting it wrong.

I was talking to one of the CFOs out there who said, “Can you ask, what is the estimated loss?” Is there a total number? Or do you just know specific incidences?

On the military side, you can imagine the difficulty that would cause a commander, if he didn’t trust his own network or his data.
adversaries  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  threats  North_Korea  ISIS  network_risk  capabilities  Russia  China  Sony  data  Pentagon  U.S._Cyber_Command  cyberattacks 
june 2016 by jerryking
President Xi Jinping’s Most Dangerous Venture Yet: Remaking China’s Military - WSJ
By JEREMY PAGE
Updated April 25, 2016

Over the last decade, the PLA has built up capabilities–including nuclear submarines, anti-ship missiles, advanced fighter jets and an aircraft carrier–that are designed to prevent the U.S. from intervening in a conflict in Asia. It is also expanding its global operations with the aim of protecting China’s overseas interests, including shipping lanes, oil supplies and expatriate citizens.
Xi_Jinping  PLA  China  security_&_intelligence  reorganizations  capabilities 
april 2016 by jerryking
Patterns of Deconstruction: Layer Mastery
JANUARY 01, 1999 | bcg.perspectives |by David Edelman.

In order to exist as a layer, a product or activity supplied by a single company must be a key input to one or many value chains, while also being modular enough to stand on its own as an independent business.
So, the first step in achieving layer mastery is to identify whether any assets or capabilities that have traditionally been part of your proprietary product definition or process expertise may represent the kernel of a new layer business. Often, the asset or capability you have been protecting most carefully is precisely the thing you should be selling to as many players as possible—competitors included—in an effort to create a branded industry standard.

Is the Layer Worth Mastering?

Not all are. Deconstruction de-averages the economics of a business. Some layers are naturally fragmented, leading to stalemate. Other layers, however, can be highly scale sensitive, leading to winner-takes-all competitive dynamics.
For instance, as deconstruction separates physical activities from informational ones, a new information-based scale is emerging. In layers governed by this information scale, network effects create ever increasing value for customers as more of them use the layer—a powerful economic logic for the existence of a dominant competitor.
BCG  layer_mastery  deconstruction  core_competencies  winner-take-all  physical_activities  value_chains  scaling  assets  capabilities  network_effects  kernels  informational_activities 
april 2015 by jerryking
TMX’s Eccleston says Canadian exchanges need new technology - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 03 2014

The new head of TMX Group Ltd. says the stock exchange company needs to diversify and develop new technology products to help counter the impact of Canada’s highly cyclical commodity-dominated markets...“What we can’t do is simply let them all sit as totally separate entities,” he said. “They all run as verticals. But the challenge is how do you take those things and understand how to use the capabilities to create more integrated solutions that give you some competitive advantage?”...he needs to create a strategy for a portfolio of TMX businesses.

“I think it’s time to start thinking about TMX as not a group of exchanges and clearing businesses, but really a very strong technology-based organization that happens to manage exchanges, clearing businesses, risk-management business, data businesses and a number of other things,” he said.
TMX  Lou_Eccleston  product_development  stockmarkets  first90days  trading_platforms  bourses  Bay_Street  capabilities  competitive_advantage  diversification  new_products  portfolio_management  systems_integration 
december 2014 by jerryking
Economist Ricardo Hausmann Says U.S. Should Reinvent Manufacturing
January 4, 2013 | MIT Technology Review | By Antonio Regalado.

[ less keen on setting up entire industries at home and instead try to insert themselves into global supply chains. Sometimes this means changing, not just exploiting, their comparative advantage.]

Using complexity theory and trade data, Hausmann looks at what a country is good at making and predicts what types of more valuable items it could produce next.

That sounds plain enough, but the results of Hausmann’s analyses are often surprising. A country with a competitive garment industry might want to move into electronics assembly—both need an industrial zone with quality electrical power and good logistics. A country that exports flowers may find it has the expertise in cold-storage logistics necessary to spark an export boom in fresh produce.
economists  manufacturers  reinvention  competitiveness_of_nations  industrial_zones  competitive_advantage  economies_of_scope  linkages  policymaking  kaleidoscopic  comparative_advantage  supply_chains  value_chains  capabilities  cold_storage 
march 2013 by jerryking
Five savvy questions for strategic success
Feb. 05 2013 | The Globe and Mail |HARVEY SCHACHTER
Playing to Win
By A.G. Lafley and Roger Martin

(Harvard Business School Press, 260 pages, $30)
The strategy worked, by satisfying the five questions:

* Winning aspirations. Most companies have lofty mission statements but the authors say that isn’t the same thing as having a strategy. It’s a starting point, statements of an ideal future.
* Where to play. In which markets and with which customers is it best to compete? This is a vital question, because you can’t be all things to all people if you want to be successful.

* How to win.After selecting the playing field, you must choose the best approach, which the authors stress might be very different from your competitors.
* Core capabilities. What capabilities must be in place for your organization to win?
* Management systems. What needs to be in place in your management approach to support the strategy, and measure how successful you are with it
Harvey_Schachter  Roger_Martin  book_reviews  P&G  A.G._Lafley  strategy  mission_statements  questions  ambitions  internal_systems  core_competencies  instrumentation_monitoring  measurements  books  capabilities 
february 2013 by jerryking
Canada needs a foreign affairs culture - The Globe and Mail
IRVIN STUDIN

irvin studin
From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jan. 04, 2012

The core of the foreign policy and larger international affairs debate in Canada should not be about the ends we may wish to pursue as a collective, but rather about the means necessary to advance the ends legitimately chosen by any elected government. The desired ends will clearly change according to the times and government, but the means to success for Canada are stable and undifferentiated, and they need to be built up.

Without this reversal of strategic logic (means before ends, rather than ends dictating means), we Canadians are left talking to ourselves about problems in the world we're interested in but typically incapable of solving – for lack of the requisite means to do so.......So what's the nature of the "means" debate that Canada needs to have to be a major (and credible) global player this century? Two interrelated "means" levers need to be addressed: national culture and national capabilities. A country that's serious about advancing ambitious ends in the world – defending minority religions or, say, brokering peace and transforming impoverished countries, or even fighting a just war – requires a public culture that can properly assess happenings beyond North America, and can support sustained engagement by Canada beyond our borders. More concretely, it needs the practical capabilities to advance these ends: talent (in key positions), assets (intelligence, military, diplomatic), money and, to be sure, differentiated relationships with players in the world.

To be a leader not only in the Americas but also in the world, Canada needs more foreign affairs culture, and certainly more capabilities. We might start by creating that army of Spanish and Portuguese speakers that the federal government surely requires to advance its stated ends. Let's add some Mandarin and Arabic speakers for good measure.

None of this is possible without a brave political leadership that applies pressure over time to build the culture and capabilities today that will allow us to score major foreign policy achievements in the long term.
Canada  Canadian  capabilities  capacity-building  diplomacy  foreign_policy  leadership  resources  technology 
january 2012 by jerryking
The Art of Economic Complexity
May 11, 2011

A new way to visualize a country’s development.
By TIM HARFORD
Graphic by CÉSAR A. HIDALGO and ALEX SIMOES.

These diagrams are the early fruits of a new approach to the most important unsolved problem of the last century: how to make a rich country out of a poor one. Development economists have many theories about how the trick is done but few proven answers. A compelling solution would be useful closer to home, too: understanding the process of economic development would help us work out whether it matters that service jobs are replacing manufacturing ones or whether there is anything the government can and should do to stimulate new industries like biotechnology or green energy.......Economies produce "stuff," and if you want more stuff to come out of the process, put more stuff in (like human capital, say). Yet economies do not produce stuff so much as billions of distinct types of goods — perhaps 10 billion.....ranging from size 34 dark stonewash bootcut jeans to beauty therapies involving avocado. The difference between China's economy and that of the United States is not simply that China's is smaller; it has a different structure entirely......we can now visualize the differences between national economies in new ways....... think of economies as collections of "capabilities" that can be combined in different ways like an Erector set to produce different products. ...Economies that export many types of products are more likely to be sophisticated; products exported only by sophisticated economies are more likely to be complex. ............Products are closely connected on the underlying network if they tend to be exported by the same economies. .............At the fringes of the product space are development dead ends. Better-connected nodes represent industries that offer promising prospects for growth..........economies change in structure over time, moving from simpler goods to scarcer, more valuable ones. Countries rarely make radical structural changes. Instead, they generate capabilities gradually, and new industries usually develop from existing ones. Unfortunately, some industries — oil extraction, say, or fishing — do not naturally lead to anything new without a huge leap.
adjacencies  capabilities  complexity  data  digital_economy  economics  infographics  kaleidoscopic  Tim_Harford  visualization 
may 2011 by jerryking
Letters to the Editor - Magazine - The Atlantic
Sept. 2005 | Atlantic | Assorted letters w.r.t Robert Kaplan's
cover story "How We Would Fight China" (June). "I believe that China's
intentions are much more defensive than offensive. But the U.S. mil.
must plan according to the capabilities of rising powers with which we
do not have alliances—because intentions and motives can shift
overnight. Although China's intentions may be good, PACOM would not be
doing its job for the taxpayers unless it planned for that to change."
"Of course, diplomacy will provide the ultimate solution in the Pacific,
but in order to avoid tragedy the military must think tragically.
Getting that right increases the credibility of our diplomacy. " "The fundamental driver of Chinese for. policy is not rapacious expansionism or Bismarckian realpolitik...China's for. policy is.. an extension of its domestic politics, specifically the ambition of the Communist Party to retain its pre-eminence despite the ongoing and wholesale transformation of Chinese society."
adversaries  Bismarck  capabilities  China  China_rising  expansionism  intentions  letters_to_the_editor  maritime  motives  PACOM  rapaciousness  rising_powers  realpolitik  Robert_Kaplan  South_China_Sea  thinking_tragically  U.S._Navy 
march 2010 by jerryking
Fear of China - WSJ.com
APRIL 21, 2006 | Wall Street Journal | by ROBERT D. KAPLAN.
"Given the stakes involved in the competition between the U.S. and China
in the new century, the only way that the business community's optimism
can be sustained is if the U.S. military thinks and plans in terms of
worst-case scenarios." "Motives -- especially in a dynamic and volatile
society such as China's -- can easily change over time, and are
dependent upon unforeseen domestic and foreign crises. Thus, when it
comes to countries that are not allies, the job of a military is to
think in terms of capabilities; not motives."... While American and
European elites think purely in terms of globalization, Chinese leaders
think also in terms of 19th-century grand strategy. "relationships are
more important than hardware." "Thinking pessimistically about China
should never be a self-fulfilling prophecy,"
Robert_Kaplan  China  ambitions  scenario-planning  worst-case  U.S._military  motivations  capabilities  strategic_thinking  PACOM  grand_strategy  thinking_tragically 
march 2010 by jerryking

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