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jerryking : capacity-building   6

Canada’s future depends on a new deal with First Nations - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 29 2013 |The Globe and Mail | Bob Rae.

Two underlying trends are now making the issue of genuine and deep reconciliation a matter of necessity rather than mere political choice: a continuing expansion of Canada’s resource industries to the heartland of traditional first nations’ territories, and a demographic revolution that is transforming Canada’s inner cities – first nations are no longer “out there”, they are now “right here”.

The challenge of reconciliation will require a clearer and stronger response from all sides. “Capacity building” is not a one way street. But there is an important paradigm shift underway: First Nations are taking an ownership stake in infrastructure, hydro, and other developments; companies are addressing issues of jobs, training, and equity participation; governments are beginning to address issues of revenue sharing.
aboriginals  economic_development  reconciliation  Bob_Rae  natural_resources  capacity-building  paradigm_shifts 
december 2013 by jerryking
Toward better, smarter foreign aid - The Globe and Mail
Mar. 29 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Editorial

...the federal government’s decision in the 2013 budget to fold the Canadian International Development Agency into the Foreign Affairs Department has aroused controversy, with claims that the government is trying to diminish Canada’s contribution to the overcoming of international poverty. These objections are misplaced. A more focused version of CIDA will do better work. There is no need to measure success by larger budget allocations or some set percentage of Canada’s GDP....Scott Gilmore, the CEO and founder of Building Partners, has changed the focus of his development organization, toward connecting local entrepreneurs in emerging markets to domestic, regional and global supply chains.

“We have changed our entire model. We now work with mining companies to help them find local supplies. We work with local governments so they can learn how to win contracts and back small businesses so they can afford to bid on larger projects. It is a revolutionary way of thinking for the development industry. ”
capacity-building  Canada  Canadian  CIDA  editorials  foreign_aid  foreign_policy  international_development  rethinking  Scott_Gilmore 
march 2013 by jerryking
Good leadership is Africa’s missing ingredient
Mar. 04 2013 | The Globe and Mail |Robert Rotberg.

Because so many of sub-Saharan Africa’s 49 countries are preinstitutional, and not yet fully nations, leaders matter immensely, more than they do in the developed world. Leaders call the shots, as they have in most sub-Saharan African countries since independence in the 1960s. They set the ethical tone. If leaders are greedy, as many are, their citizens become more cynical and the quality of governmental discourse suffers enormously.

In Africa and elsewhere, governments are expected by their subjects to provide security and safety, rule of law, open political participation, sustainable economic prospects and a large measure of human development (educational and health opportunities and services).

In states where political institutions are weak, legislatures are subordinate to executives, the media are barely free and the judiciary is subordinate rather than independent, the manner in which leaders behave as presidents and prime ministers is much more decisive than it might be in a fully-formed nation where political institutions work and constrain overweening political executives.

A majority of the countries of sub-Saharan Africa are still controlled by men who are motivated not by what they can do for their people but by what their people can do for them. Such leaders exist to prey on their own citizens, to extract from the body politic corrupt rents and other privileges that benefit the ruler and ruling class, their families, and their cliques or lineages.
leadership  leaders  leadership_development  Africa  CIDA  capacity-building  weak_states  judiciary  institutions  greed  rent-seeking  institutional_integrity  failed_states  ruling_classes  sub-Saharan_Africa  Non-Integrating_Gap  autocrats  misgovernance  predatory_practices  developing_countries  independent_judiciary 
march 2013 by jerryking
Canada needs a foreign affairs culture - The Globe and Mail
IRVIN STUDIN

irvin studin
From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jan. 04, 2012

The core of the foreign policy and larger international affairs debate in Canada should not be about the ends we may wish to pursue as a collective, but rather about the means necessary to advance the ends legitimately chosen by any elected government. The desired ends will clearly change according to the times and government, but the means to success for Canada are stable and undifferentiated, and they need to be built up.

Without this reversal of strategic logic (means before ends, rather than ends dictating means), we Canadians are left talking to ourselves about problems in the world we're interested in but typically incapable of solving – for lack of the requisite means to do so.......So what's the nature of the "means" debate that Canada needs to have to be a major (and credible) global player this century? Two interrelated "means" levers need to be addressed: national culture and national capabilities. A country that's serious about advancing ambitious ends in the world – defending minority religions or, say, brokering peace and transforming impoverished countries, or even fighting a just war – requires a public culture that can properly assess happenings beyond North America, and can support sustained engagement by Canada beyond our borders. More concretely, it needs the practical capabilities to advance these ends: talent (in key positions), assets (intelligence, military, diplomatic), money and, to be sure, differentiated relationships with players in the world.

To be a leader not only in the Americas but also in the world, Canada needs more foreign affairs culture, and certainly more capabilities. We might start by creating that army of Spanish and Portuguese speakers that the federal government surely requires to advance its stated ends. Let's add some Mandarin and Arabic speakers for good measure.

None of this is possible without a brave political leadership that applies pressure over time to build the culture and capabilities today that will allow us to score major foreign policy achievements in the long term.
Canada  Canadian  capabilities  capacity-building  diplomacy  foreign_policy  leadership  resources  technology 
january 2012 by jerryking
We must restore our diplomatic core - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 08, 2011 |G&M |ALLAN GOTLIEB & COLIN ROBERTSON.
Mr. Harper seems to foresee a highly active foreign policy, & a very
independent one. “We also have a purpose,” he said.“And that purpose is
no longer just to go along and get along with everyone else’s
agenda.”..Negotiating a new accord with the US to reverse the hardening
of our border, protecting the access of energy exports to US mkts,
creating new mkts for our oil sands, negotiating a free-trade deal with
the EU & India, strengthening relations with China, protecting Cdn.
interests in the Arctic ...In this age of the Internet & WikiLeaks,
the role of diplomacy needs to be assessed & understood. The PM
should commission a task force on the foreign service, as he did for
Afghan. It’s been > 30 yrs. since the McDougall Commission looked at
our diplomats. There will be no new golden age of Canadian foreign
policy w/o investing in the HR that, in the PM’s words, are necessary
“to making Canada a meaningful contributor in the world.”
capacity-building  Stephen_Harper  Canada  Canadian  foreign_policy  globalization  diplomacy  rebuilding  WikiLeaks  golden_age 
august 2011 by jerryking

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