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jerryking : career-defining_moments   4

Five ways to cope when you fail to get the top job | Financial Times
Michael Skapinker

If you are one of these thwarted pyramid climbers, how do you cope? Here are five suggestions.

■ Ask yourself how much you really wanted it. No one gets to the top without personal sacrifice.....Possibly your unwillingness to make those sacrifices on the way up is what cost you that final promotion in the first place. Or possibly something else:

■ You just weren’t good enough......Think of how many people did not rise to your level and value what you did achieve.

■ It’s not over until it’s over. ....The new incumbent could quit...

■ Do something else. There is a whole world out there.... start a start-up...join a non-profit..if you have plenty of money....spend time travelling, learning a language or writing a book.
■ There are more important things in life. ....It leaves little time for reading, hobbies, artistic endeavours — all the things you will need for a fulfilling life when the job is over. You can catch up with those pursuits later, but what you cannot recover are the family and friends you neglected on the way. Treat them as you would want to be treated while you are working and they will always be there for you. That promotion you might have got is no match for that.
bouncing_back  CEOs  setbacks  disappointment  Managing_Your_Career  personal_sacrifice  inspiration  seminal_moments  career-defining_moments 
june 2018 by jerryking
A Turnaround Job Can Make Your Career If You Choose Wisely
Sep. 19, 1995 | WSJ | HAL LANCASTER.

It's an age-old dilemma: Saving a sinking ship can make a career; but some ships can't be salvaged, and a high-profile failure can scuttle a promising career. (Yes, I know failures aren't supposed to be fatal any more because companies realize what valuable learning experiences they are. If you want fairy tales, you'll have to look elsewhere.)

So when is it prudent to take on a tough turnaround assignment? ... And how would she advise others weighing the risks of a turnaround assignment? Research, research and research, she says, and then go with your gut instinct. ``There's a point at which you have enough information to act,'' she says. ``If you wait to get everything, you're too late.''

If that philosophy doesn't work for you, try this one, from Gen. Colin Powell's list of rules to live by, which Ms. Lewis keeps on her office wall: ``Don't let adverse facts get in the way of a good decision.''
career-defining_moments  career_ending_moves  Colin_Powell  collectibles  decline  due_diligence  failure  gut_feelings  Hal_Lancaster  Managing_Your_Career  risks  turnarounds  women 
february 2013 by jerryking
Career-defining moments signal need for change
After September 29, 2000 | Globe & Mail | Barbara Moses

Sometimes it's not after careful analysis but in an epiphany that people realize it's time to move on. It may occur as a result of a major event such as a life-threatening illness, or it may come in the form of a realization that the work we're doing is out of sync with our values or lacks meaning.

"A career-defining moment," Moses writes, "is, typically, a signal that you need to change your course -- or at the very least, sit down and think very carefully about your future." .... Before changing jobs or careers, be sure you aren't acting hastily. "When people believe that the grass is greener elsewhere, the danger is that they will jump jobs or careers prematurely," writes Barbara Moses in "The Good News About Careers: How You'll Be Working in the Next Decade" (Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer, 1999 -- see our full review of Moses' book ).

"Instead of doing a thorough assessment of both their short-term interests and long-term needs, they move on at the first opportunity, in the belief that all kinds of things will work out in their new job," Moses writes. "Unfortunately, in many cases, they discover that their new job is not a panacea --that in many ways they were actually happier before."

Sometimes one or two irritants with a job become magnified in a person's mind, Moses says. But, she adds, a job doesn't have to be rotten in order for it to be the right time to leave. It may be that it's become so routine that a person needs a new challenge.
Barbara_Moses  Managing_Your_Career  career_paths  warning_signs  change  seminal_moments  career-defining_moments 
december 2012 by jerryking
Recovering From a Late Setback - WSJ.com
May 27, 2003 | WSJ | By JOANN S. LUBLIN

The well-publicized announcement made it impossible for Mr. White to mourn in private. But the coverage started him on the road to recovery by bringing him advice from his wide personal and professional network. "There is important work in the world for a person of your ability and integrity," wrote Fred Alger, founder and CEO of Fred Alger Management. Mr. White has been a trustee for some of the New York money-management firm's funds since 1999...Mr. White decided not to blame others for his turndown nor let the episode diminish him in any way.

He demonstrated his resolve by trying to arrange a flawless transition. Among other things, he prepared extensive background materials, then briefed Ms. Coleman face-to-face in Iowa.

Mr. White brought his inner turmoil to a cathartic conclusion during a campus dinner to honor his interim leadership in July 2002. University regents and senior officials expected perfunctory remarks. Sensing a "teachable" moment, the veteran professor instead spoke candidly about his loss to an already uneasy crowd.

"It's no secret to anyone in this room that I'm disappointed not to be able to serve the university in the years ahead," Mr. White declared. He went on: "We can choose how to think about and react to disappointment. At the extremes, one line of thought leads to bitterness and a shriveled soul; the other leads to wisdom and growth." Mr. White said his own career disappointment had enabled him to challenge himself about "what will be my work, my contributions, my sources of satisfaction and self-esteem?" He got a standing ovation.
bouncing_back  Joann_S._Lublin  setbacks  Managing_Your_Career  inspiration  Wall_Street  Colleges_&_Universities  disappointment  affirmations  seminal_moments  career-defining_moments  emotional_mastery  mybestlife  teachable_moments 
march 2012 by jerryking

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